8

Here is the DDL --

create table tbl1 (
   id number,
   value varchar2(50)
);

insert into tbl1 values (1, 'AA, UT, BT, SK, SX');
insert into tbl1 values (2, 'AA, UT, SX');
insert into tbl1 values (3, 'UT, SK, SX, ZF');

Notice, here value is comma separated string.

But, we need result like following-

ID VALUE
-------------
1  AA
1  UT
1  BT
1  SK
1  SX
2  AA
2  UT
2  SX
3  UT
3  SK
3  SX
3  ZF

How do we write SQL for this?

18

I agree that this is a really bad design. Try this if you can't change that design:

select distinct id, trim(regexp_substr(value,'[^,]+', 1, level) ) value, level
  from tbl1
   connect by regexp_substr(value, '[^,]+', 1, level) is not null
   order by id, level;

OUPUT

id value level
1   AA  1
1   UT  2
1   BT  3
1   SK  4
1   SX  5
2   AA  1
2   UT  2
2   SX  3
3   UT  1
3   SK  2
3   SX  3
3   ZF  4

Credits to this

To remove duplicates in a more elegant and efficient way (credits to @mathguy)

select id, trim(regexp_substr(value,'[^,]+', 1, level) ) value, level
  from tbl1
   connect by regexp_substr(value, '[^,]+', 1, level) is not null
      and PRIOR id =  id 
      and PRIOR SYS_GUID() is not null  
   order by id, level;

If you want an "ANSIer" approach go with a CTE:

with t (id,res,val,lev) as (
           select id, trim(regexp_substr(value,'[^,]+', 1, 1 )) res, value as val, 1 as lev
             from tbl1
            where regexp_substr(value, '[^,]+', 1, 1) is not null
            union all           
            select id, trim(regexp_substr(val,'[^,]+', 1, lev+1) ) res, val, lev+1 as lev
              from t
              where regexp_substr(val, '[^,]+', 1, lev+1) is not null
              )
select id, res,lev
  from t
order by id, lev;

OUTPUT

id  val lev
1   AA  1
1   UT  2
1   BT  3
1   SK  4
1   SX  5
2   AA  1
2   UT  2
2   SX  3
3   UT  1
3   SK  2
3   SX  3
3   ZF  4

Another recursive approach by MT0 but without regex:

WITH t ( id, value, start_pos, end_pos ) AS
  ( SELECT id, value, 1, INSTR( value, ',' ) FROM tbl1
  UNION ALL
  SELECT id,
    value,
    end_pos                    + 1,
    INSTR( value, ',', end_pos + 1 )
  FROM t
  WHERE end_pos > 0
  )
SELECT id,
  SUBSTR( value, start_pos, DECODE( end_pos, 0, LENGTH( value ) + 1, end_pos ) - start_pos ) AS value
FROM t
ORDER BY id,
  start_pos;

I've tried 3 approaches with a 30000 rows dataset and 118104 rows returned and got the following average results:

  • My recursive approach: 5 seconds
  • MT0 approach: 4 seconds
  • Mathguy approach: 16 seconds
  • MT0 recursive approach no-regex: 3.45 seconds

@Mathguy has also tested with a bigger dataset:

In all cases the recursive query (I only tested the one with regular substr and instr) does better, by a factor of 2 to 5. Here are the combinations of # of strings / tokens per string and CTAS execution times for hierarchical vs. recursive, hierarchical first. All times in seconds

  • 30,000 x 4: 5 / 1.
  • 30,000 x 10: 15 / 3.
  • 30,000 x 25: 56 / 37.
  • 5,000 x 50: 33 / 14.
  • 5,000 x 100: 160 / 81.
  • 10,000 x 200: 1,924 / 772
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    See this, for example, for how to avoid duplicates (so you don't have to select DISTINCT): community.oracle.com/thread/2526535 – mathguy Jul 14 '16 at 11:47
  • Great insight @mathguy. Thanks. – vercelli Jul 14 '16 at 11:54
  • 1
    @vercelli Just be aware that it is a hack. Using a correlated table collection expression (as per my answer or this answer) does not generate duplicates and does not need this trickery to prevent cyclic connections in the data. – MT0 Jul 14 '16 at 12:08
  • 1
    @Vercelli - That difference in performance would be a much better reason to prefer the "collections" route (MT0) and your "recursive" route. I am going to test more - I suspect with longer strings (with more tokens per input string) performance may be different. If there is interest, I should probably open a separate question/thread to post test results, etc. For right now, I just tested the hierarchical solution ("my" solution) with 30000 input strings and 4 tokens per string, total output 120000 rows; on my laptop and with the free version of Oracle 11.2, it takes 5.1 seconds to run. – mathguy Jul 14 '16 at 17:40
  • 1
    OK, I just tested with different scenarios. In all cases the recursive query (I only tested the one with regular substr and instr) does better, by a factor of 2 to 5. Here are the combinations of # of strings / tokens per string and CTAS execution times for hierarchical vs. recursive, hierarchical first. All times in seconds. 30,000 x 4: 5 / 1. 30,000 x 10: 15 / 3. 30,000 x 25: 56 / 37. 5,000 x 50: 33 / 14. 5,000 x 100: 160 / 81. 10,000 x 200: 1,924 / 772 – mathguy Jul 14 '16 at 19:26
4

This will get the values without requiring you to remove duplicates or having to use a hack of including SYS_GUID() or DBMS_RANDOM.VALUE() in the CONNECT BY:

SELECT t.id,
       v.COLUMN_VALUE AS value
FROM   TBL1 t,
       TABLE(
         CAST(
           MULTISET(
             SELECT TRIM( REGEXP_SUBSTR( t.value, '[^,]+', 1, LEVEL ) )
             FROM   DUAL
             CONNECT BY LEVEL <= REGEXP_COUNT( t.value, '[^,]+' )
           )
           AS SYS.ODCIVARCHAR2LIST
         )
       ) v

Update:

Returning the index of the element in the list:

Option 1 - Return a UDT:

CREATE TYPE string_pair IS OBJECT( lvl INT, value VARCHAR2(4000) );
/

CREATE TYPE string_pair_table IS TABLE OF string_pair;
/

SELECT t.id,
       v.*
FROM   TBL1 t,
       TABLE(
         CAST(
           MULTISET(
             SELECT string_pair( level, TRIM( REGEXP_SUBSTR( t.value, '[^,]+', 1, LEVEL ) ) )
             FROM   DUAL
             CONNECT BY LEVEL <= REGEXP_COUNT( t.value, '[^,]+' )
           )
           AS string_pair_table
         )
       ) v;

Option 2 - Use ROW_NUMBER():

SELECT t.id,
       v.COLUMN_VALUE AS value,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( PARTITION BY id ORDER BY ROWNUM ) AS lvl
FROM   TBL1 t,
       TABLE(
         CAST(
           MULTISET(
             SELECT TRIM( REGEXP_SUBSTR( t.value, '[^,]+', 1, LEVEL ) )
             FROM   DUAL
             CONNECT BY LEVEL <= REGEXP_COUNT( t.value, '[^,]+' )
           )
           AS SYS.ODCIVARCHAR2LIST
         )
       ) v;
| improve this answer | |
  • I disagree; CONNECT BY with no condition using the PRIOR operator, as you do, is a hack (it violates the Oracle requirements for hierarchical queries). I don't see what the hack is when using PRIOR SYS_GUID() to break cycles; that is a perfectly legitimate use of hierarchical queries. – mathguy Jul 14 '16 at 12:28
  • 1
    @mathguy Tom Kyte has stated that this is a bug with the documentation and that "No, you have never needed PRIOR in a connect by." (link). – MT0 Jul 14 '16 at 12:46
  • @MT0 you are missing a ' on TRIM( REGEXP_SUBSTR( t.value, '[^,]+ – vercelli Jul 14 '16 at 14:28
  • 1
    @vercelli Thanks, fixed – MT0 Jul 14 '16 at 14:58
  • Just reading about cast(multiset(....)) - if I remember correctly (from reading about this a couple months ago), a nested table in Oracle can only have one column, right? Or is it possible to extract not just the tokens, but also their "level" within the original string? In some cases, presumably the order of the tokens has meaning that may need to be used in further processing. – mathguy Jul 14 '16 at 17:37
3

Vercelli posted a correct answer. However, with more than one string to split, connect by will generate an exponentially-growing number of rows, with many, many duplicates. (Just try the query without distinct.) This will destroy performance on data of non-trivial size.

One common way to overcome this problem is to use a prior condition and an additional check to avoid cycles in the hierarchy. Like so:

select id, trim(regexp_substr(value,'[^,]+', 1, level) ) value, level
  from tbl1
   connect by regexp_substr(value, '[^,]+', 1, level) is not null
          and prior id = id
          and prior sys_guid() is not null
   order by id, level;

See, for example, this discussion on OTN: https://community.oracle.com/thread/2526535

| improve this answer | |
  • I know we've discussed this before but using SYS_GUID() is a hack and I believe it is better to use a correlated table collection expression which will never generate these duplicates and so you do not have to resort to work-arounds to deal with them. – MT0 Jul 14 '16 at 11:57
  • We did discuss it before. I know nothing (I only started learning SQL and Oracle this February), but I find that all the gurus on OTN, Tom Kyte, etc. all use the sys_guid() or dbms_random.value() trick. See the link I provided. Note that connect by without a condition using the PRIOR operator is already a hack (it violates the Oracle requirements for CONNECT BY - see the documentation: docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28286/queries003.htm , see the second bullet point after the syntax diagram). – mathguy Jul 14 '16 at 12:04
  • @MT0 - actually, I changed my mind. CONNECT BY without a condition using PRIOR is a hack and may not be supported in the future. The way I use it is not a hack because I do use the PRIOR operator in at least one condition. SYS_GUID() is guaranteed to produce different values for each row, which then results in there not being cycles in the hierarchy. I don't agree that this is a hack. Why is it a hack? – mathguy Jul 14 '16 at 12:24
  • It is a hack because AND PRIOR SYS_GUID() IS NOT NULL will always be true so the condition boils down to AND TRUE and should be irrelevant - however, removing it you will get ORA-01436: CONNECT BY loop in user data. – MT0 Jul 14 '16 at 12:34
  • That is incorrect. AND PRIOR SYS_GUID() IS NOT NULL does two things, not one. It evaluates to TRUE in all cases, but it also adds a unique bit of data to each newly generated row. AND TRUE only does the first job, not the second. – mathguy Jul 14 '16 at 12:45
2

An alternate method is to define a simple PL/SQL function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION split_String(
  i_str    IN  VARCHAR2,
  i_delim  IN  VARCHAR2 DEFAULT ','
) RETURN SYS.ODCIVARCHAR2LIST DETERMINISTIC
AS
  p_result       SYS.ODCIVARCHAR2LIST := SYS.ODCIVARCHAR2LIST();
  p_start        NUMBER(5) := 1;
  p_end          NUMBER(5);
  c_len CONSTANT NUMBER(5) := LENGTH( i_str );
  c_ld  CONSTANT NUMBER(5) := LENGTH( i_delim );
BEGIN
  IF c_len > 0 THEN
    p_end := INSTR( i_str, i_delim, p_start );
    WHILE p_end > 0 LOOP
      p_result.EXTEND;
      p_result( p_result.COUNT ) := SUBSTR( i_str, p_start, p_end - p_start );
      p_start := p_end + c_ld;
      p_end := INSTR( i_str, i_delim, p_start );
    END LOOP;
    IF p_start <= c_len + 1 THEN
      p_result.EXTEND;
      p_result( p_result.COUNT ) := SUBSTR( i_str, p_start, c_len - p_start + 1 );
    END IF;
  END IF;
  RETURN p_result;
END;
/

Then the SQL becomes very simple:

SELECT t.id,
       v.column_value AS value
FROM   TBL1 t,
       TABLE( split_String( t.value ) ) v
| improve this answer | |

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