1

A little background:

We're migrating to a new SQL server which is much higher spec than the old one and includes a new version of SSMS (2014).

There is a view that is used countless times per day. When running on the old server it consistently takes around 1 minutes 30 seconds, whereas on the new server it takes significantly longer; 5 minutes or so usually.

SELECT v1.*
FROM view1 v1
    UNION ALL
SELECT v2.*
FROM view2 v2
    UNION ALL
SELECT v3.*
FROM view3 v3

I find that on the new server if I just use one UNION ALL and two of the views, the query will execute in seconds. For example both of the below will execute successfully in under 10 seconds.

SELECT v1.* 
FROM view1 v1
    UNION ALL
SELECT v2.*
FROM view2 v2

And

SELECT v2.*
FROM view2 v2
    UNION ALL
SELECT v3.*
FROM view3 v3

But as soon as I add the extra UNION ALL to the statement to include the third view, the query takes around 5 minutes.

The view itself isn't the problem, since on the old server it runs just fine. Is there some setting on the new server that I might be missing which could potentially speed this up?

Thanks in advance.

UPDATE

I have noticed that it isn't due to the fact that three views are combined using UNION ALL, in fact it's down to two specific views that are taking ages to UNION ALL together. To explain:

SELECT v1.* FROM view1 v1
UNION ALL
SELECT v2.* FROM view2 v2

And

SELECT v2.* FROM view2 v2
UNION ALL
SELECT v3.* FROM view3 v3

Both execute in under 10 seconds, however the following takes 5 minutes to execute.

SELECT v1.* FROM view1 v1
UNION ALL
SELECT v3.* FROM view3 v3

This isn't due to the number of rows returned, as the view that returns the most rows (~3500 rows) is the one that is actually omitted from the slow UNION ALL statement, view2. The other two views return roughly 400 rows each.

Is this an issue with data, then. Is there something I should look for in these two views?

3
  • have you looked at the execution plan of this querie on both sql servers ? Can you see a difference there ?
    – GuidoG
    Jul 14 '16 at 11:40
  • How did you get the database to the new server? Backup / Restore or some other method?
    – Joe C
    Jul 14 '16 at 11:49
  • Related: read this and read about parameter sniffing
    – Shnugo
    Jul 14 '16 at 11:52
3

This is too long for a comment.

The problem -- in all likelihood -- is not the union all but the views. Views are compiled the first time that they are invoked in a query. If the underlying data changes, the execution plan may not change.

You should compare the execution plans on the two servers. And, then, you should re-compile the queries on the two servers.

If this works, you might want to set up a job that recompiles the views every night to be sure that the execution plan remains in-sync with underlying data.

2
  • Thanks for the suggestion. The execution plans are certainly different on both servers, but recompiling the view using sp_recompile did not resolve the issue and it is still taking significantly longer than expected to run.
    – ryansin
    Jul 14 '16 at 13:23
  • The view is not indexed, so I can't run UPDATE STATISTICS as far as I'm aware
    – ryansin
    Jul 14 '16 at 14:30
1

SQL Server 2014 has a brand new Cardinality Estimator, which means that you MIGHT get a different execution plan than in the older version. You can try to add OPTION(QUERYTRACEON 9481) at the end of the query to force usage of the old version of the CE.

If it helps - that was the problem. If it doesn't - keep looking (can you post an execution plan?)

2
  • Thanks! That didn't work unfortunately; the query took around 10 minutes to run which is longer than it does without OPTION(QUERYTRACEON 9481)
    – ryansin
    Jul 14 '16 at 14:55
  • Thanks for the info on the new cardinality estimator, that ultimately pointed me towards a solution
    – ryansin
    Jul 15 '16 at 14:48
0

I managed to get this working in around 15 seconds; blisteringly fast!

The link below documents an issue where certain complex queries are running much more slowly with the new SQL Server 2014 Cardinality Estimator due to drastic overestimation of the returned number of rows. In the end, the solution was to add the trace flag 4199 to the query and this resolved the issue.

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/psssql/2015/06/16/identifying-sql-server-2014-new-cardinality-estimator-issues-and-service-pack-1-improvement/

SELECT v1.*
FROM view1 v1
    UNION ALL
SELECT v2.*
FROM view2 v2
    UNION ALL
SELECT v3.*
FROM view3 v3
OPTION (QUERYTRACEON 4199)

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