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Possible Duplicate:
Simultaneous execution of both if and else blocks

Is it possible to put some condition, so that both if and else part in an if ...else control statement can be executed without any warning or error ??

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  • 6
    I would hope not; and its a NO in all the languages I know. – NimChimpsky Oct 1 '10 at 9:19
  • 2
    Wouldn't that undo the purpose of an if-else? – Sagar V Oct 1 '10 at 9:21
  • 5
    Try and describe what your actual problem is instead, seems like its a solution looking for a problem at the moment. – Kristoffer Sall-Storgaard Oct 1 '10 at 9:21
  • 4
    umm..don't write the if condition in the first place. – Naveen Oct 1 '10 at 9:27
  • 3
    Why do you want to do this? Clearly this is not a party-game you're asking for so there has to be some kind of problem you want to solve? What is that problem? If you tell us about that, we might be able to give you usable answers. – Lasse V. Karlsen Oct 1 '10 at 9:28
26

Do not use! ;-)

Yes, by forking.

if ( fork() ) {
    printf("if\n");
}
else {
    printf("else\n");
}

There are no real use cases to prefer the above code, unless it is for parallel execution.

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  • 2
    Smart but this just confuses the issue. – Janek Bogucki Oct 1 '10 at 9:28
  • 3
    +1 Impressive ... but I don't know if it's a good or a bad impression :) – pmg Oct 1 '10 at 9:41
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    +1 creative thinking; - a trillion because many people will implement it now ;-) – Mario The Spoon Oct 1 '10 at 9:53
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    It's an ingenious way to answer the question (so +1) but doesn't it make you feel dirty all over? – Basic Oct 1 '10 at 10:01
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    +1 for thinking outside the box; the question does not ask for a way to execute both branches in the same process. – Frerich Raabe Oct 1 '10 at 10:07
9

No, there's no way to write a Schrödinger if clause.

You might be able to execute both with a goto, but it would never pass a code review.

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  • +1. Execute 0.4 of the first branch and 0.6 of the second one. – sharptooth Oct 1 '10 at 9:45
5

Yes, it's possible:

#include <stdio.h>

#define else if (1)
int main(void)
{
    int test = 1;

    if (test == 1)
    {
        printf("if\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("else\n");
    }

    return 0;
}
#undef else

A note for newbies: Never do this in real life! Instead, think about your problem again...

What you probably wanted is :

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int one_condition = 1;
    int other_condition = 2;

    if ((one_condition == 1) || (other_condition == 2))
    {
        printf("if\n");
    }

    if ((one_condition != 1) || (other_condition == 2))
    {
        printf("quasi-else\n");
    }

    return 0;
}

You can replace the else-path by having another if-clause with negated conditions. This gives you the possibility to override it with a second condition.

4

No, that is not possible (inside the same process).

1
  • Other answers suggest that it's possible, with a goto or with a #define else if (1). – Cœur May 3 '19 at 10:29
2

Maybe you've misunderstood your problem.

If you want a code block to execute regardless of the condition, take it out of the if...else statement.

void foofunc(int n)
{
     a = 44*n;
     if(a == 484)
     {
        //do something
     }
     else
     {
        //do something if a DOES NOT equal 484
     }

     //do something regardless of the outcome of the test.
}

In this example, ridiculous though it is, the last line is outside the condition statement, so will execute whether a == 484 or not, which seems to me to be the same as making c trigger your else block regardless of the if test succeeds.

Of course, else blocks are not mandatory, so if you don't care what happens if your condition fails, then simply don't have an else block.

void foofunc(int n)
{
     a = 44*n;
     if(a == 484)
     {
        //do something
     }

     //do something regardless of the outcome of the test.
}
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1

I assume you're trying to have both branches of this sort of statement execute?

Dim X As Boolean
X = False
If X = True Then
    ...
Else
    ...
End If

You could get it to execute using GoTo ... but that goes against good programming practice.

Dim X As Boolean
X = False
If X = True Then
    ...
    Goto ElseStuff
Else
    ElseStuff:
    ...
End If

Instead of that you should write separate procedures / functions to accomplish the behavior you'd like to have execute in both statements ... or simply put the code which should execute in all cases outside of the If block.

That would be functionally equivalent to using the GoTo, plus it makes it clear to anybody else.

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  • I would say that this goes against ... EVERYTHING ... not only goodp programming practice ;-) – Mario The Spoon Oct 1 '10 at 9:55

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