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I wrote a typeclass to avoid having to write a duplicate function for a different type as below:

import Statistics.Distribution.Normal
import Data.Random

d1 :: Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double
d1 s k r v t = ( log ( s / k ) + ( ( v * v ) / 2 ) * t ) / ( v * sqrt t )

d2 :: Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double
d2 s k r v t = d1 s k r v t - v * sqrt t

call :: Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double
call s k r t v = exp ( -r * t ) * ( s * cdf normal ( d1 s k r v t )
                                  - k * cdf normal ( d2 s k r v t ) )
  where normal = Normal (0 :: Double) 1

put :: Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double
put s k r t v = exp ( -r * t ) * ( k * cdf normal ( - d2 s k r v t )
                                 - s * cdf normal ( - d1 s k r v t ) )
  where normal = Normal (0 :: Double) 1

class Black a where
  price :: a -> Double -> Double -> Double

instance Black ( Option Future ) where
  price ( Option ( Future s ) Call European k t ) r v = call s k r t v
  price ( Option ( Future s ) Put European k t ) r v = put s k r t v

instance Black ( Option Forward ) where
  price ( Option ( Forward s ) Call European k t ) r v = call s k r t v
  price ( Option ( Forward s ) Put European k t ) r v = put s k r t v

Is this a valid use of typeclasses? The reason I am asking is that I am not overloading the definition of the price function for any given type. All I am doing is avoiding having to write:

priceFuture :: (Option Future) -> Double -> Double -> Double
// impl
priceFoward :: (Option Forward) -> Double -> Double -> Double
impl



data Option a = Option a Type Style Strike Expiration deriving (Show)
data Future = Future Price deriving (Show)
data Forward = Forward Price deriving (Show)

type Barrier = Double
type Expiration = Double
type Price = Double
type Strike = Double
type Value = Double
type Dividend = Double
type Rate = Double

data Type = Call | Put deriving (Eq, Show)
data Style = European | American deriving (Eq, Show)
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  • 3
    Where's the definition of Option and Forward/Future?
    – Zeta
    Jul 14, 2016 at 17:03
  • @Zeta, I've added the types.
    – user3248346
    Jul 14, 2016 at 17:46
  • @Why are those three types? Why not data OptionKind = Future | Forward? By the way, now Price is missing. And Type. And Style.
    – Zeta
    Jul 14, 2016 at 17:49
  • @Zeta, added the other types.
    – user3248346
    Jul 14, 2016 at 17:55

2 Answers 2

5

I think I would just make the the argument to Option be a phantom type:

data Option a = Option Price Type Style Strike
data Future
data Forward

price :: Option a -> Double -> Double -> Double
price (Option s Call European k t) r v = call s k r t v
price (Option s Put  European k t) r v = put  s k r t v

Much less repetition, and no need for a type-class, but you still get a type-level distinction between forward options (Option Forward) and future options (Option Future) should you need that elsewhere. If you're really excited, you could turn on DataKinds to make sure that Future and Forward are the only two possible type-level arguments to Option.

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  • I have about 7 other different types like future and forward that I have to code for as well. Those types will have other attributes so sticking them all in the Option type as above would not be a good idea I think. The fields I have for Option at the moment (from a business perspective) pertain to that type only and not to Forward, Future and the other types I have. I tried to separate them out as I have done into their own types so the information does not get conflated. This is my first foray with Haskell and in particular Haskell design.
    – user3248346
    Jul 14, 2016 at 20:55
  • Also I'm just wondering what was stopping me from pattern matching like you have done above when I have an Option type which is higher kinded. To me, it made sense to make Option a type constructor because in itself it is useless until another type is added to it to make it into a financial contract. I was just making that notion explicit.
    – user3248346
    Jul 14, 2016 at 20:55
  • @Mika'il In such a case, a typeclass might be okay. But I would suggest a much smaller class; perhaps class HasPrice a where getPrice :: a -> Price with instances for Forward and Future; then write something like optionPrice :: HasPrice a => Option a -> Double -> Double -> Double; optionPrice (Option s Call European k t) r v = call (getPrice s) k r t v. Jul 14, 2016 at 21:06
  • Thanks for that suggestion. I was thinking on similar lines as well but never went forward that idea. I will investigate it.
    – user3248346
    Jul 14, 2016 at 21:11
1

How about this?

data Option = Option ForFut Type Style Strike Expiration deriving (Show)
data ForFut = Forward Price | Future Price deriving (Show)

type Barrier = Double
type Expiration = Double
type Price = Double
type Strike = Double
type Value = Double
type Dividend = Double

type Rate = Double

data Type = Call | Put deriving (Eq, Show)
data Style = European | American deriving (Eq, Show)

call :: Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double
call = undefined

put :: Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double -> Double
put = undefined

price :: Option -> Double -> Double -> Double
price ( Option ( Future s ) Call European k t ) r v = call s k r t v
price ( Option ( Future s ) Put European k t ) r v = put s k r t v
price ( Option ( Forward s ) Call European k t ) r v = call s k r t v
price ( Option ( Forward s ) Put European k t ) r v = put s k r t v

So I've combined the Forward and Future types into a single type. This then avoids the need to make Option a higher kinded type. The type class can then be removed, and price can be defined with simple pattern matching.

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