I am trying to query my Order model for all records but I want them ordered in a very specific way.

Database is a PostgreSQL database.

I want all records that start with NY first, NYN next, then all remaining records follow.

I think I'm trying to do something like this:

Order.all.order('order_number /^NY/, /^NYN/')

An example of data:

NY-1111111
NYN-1234567
P-000000
P0000000
SS0232131
NYN16151202

The order I want is:

NY-1111111
NYN16151202
NYN-1234567
P0000000
P-000000
SS0232131
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's one way you might do this in SQL:

SELECT * FROM orders
  ORDER BY
    CASE
      WHEN order_number LIKE 'NYN%' THEN 1
      WHEN order_number LIKE 'NY%' THEN 0
      ELSE 2
    END,
    order_number;

This can be translated pretty directly to an ActiveRecord query:

Order.order("
  CASE
    WHEN order_number LIKE 'NYN%' THEN 1
    WHEN order_number LIKE 'NY%' THEN 0
    ELSE 2
  END,
  order_number
")

Here's another possibility using PostgreSQL's POSIX regular expressions. I'm not sure how it compares to the above in performance:

Order.order("
  CASE SUBSTRING(order_number FROM '^NYN?')
    WHEN 'NY' THEN 0
    WHEN 'NYN' THEN 1
    ELSE 2
  END,
  order_number
")
  • plus 1 .. really nice and efficient answer : ) – Harsh Trivedi Jul 14 '16 at 19:18
  • Efficient and correct. That second part is sometimes sort of important ;) – mu is too short Jul 14 '16 at 19:24
  • fantastic @jordan. thank you very much. This is much more efficient and works perfect. – Vinny Alfieri Jul 14 '16 at 19:25
  • Glad to help. I've added a second solution to my answer. If you have a large data set I'd be curious which performs better. – Jordan Running Jul 14 '16 at 19:29
  • @VinnyAlfieri I've edited my answer because I realized I had the NY/NYN order backwards (I was putting "NYN" first). Also, just FYI I just noticed that in your example you have "NYN16..." before "NYN-12..." and "PP00..." before "PP-00...", which my answer doesn't address. – Jordan Running Jul 14 '16 at 20:26

You can do that by ruby sort_by method like this:

orders = Order.all.sort_by{ | order |
    if order.name =~ /^NYN/
        -1;
    elsif order.name =~ /^NY/
        -2;
    else
        0;
    end
}

So if order names are : ["ghi", "NYabc", "jk", "NYNdef"], the order would be: ["NYabc", "NYNdef", "ghi", "jk"] or ["NYabc", "NYNdef", "jk", "ghi"]

You can find the documentation of sort_by here

Hope it helps : )

  • Thanks for your answer. It is super close to what I am trying to get going. My issue now is that I need the return value to be an ActiveRecord object rather than an array which is why I wanted to try and complete the query using ActiveRecord queries. – Vinny Alfieri Jul 14 '16 at 18:46
  • Thanks Harsh. Appreciate it!!! Works great. – Vinny Alfieri Jul 14 '16 at 18:52
  • @VinnyAlfieri Welcome .. Am Glad that it helped : ) – Harsh Trivedi Jul 14 '16 at 18:53
  • 1
    This is terribly inefficient. You're pulling all of the records from the database, sorting them in Ruby, and then pulling all of the records from the database again. There's no reason not to do the sorting in your query and only fetch the records once. – Jordan Running Jul 14 '16 at 19:03
  • 1
    Are you sure that Order.find([1,2,3]) is guaranteed to return the models in the 1,2,3 order? And why refetch them if you already have them? – mu is too short Jul 14 '16 at 19:23

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