I have an array of outlines and points. For an outline, calling outline.geometry.coordinates produces a multidimensional array of coordinates:

[[[-72.68639118392117,41.66733032827929],[-72.68630366033922,41.667449647115724], ...]] 

For a point, calling point.geometry.coordinates produces a one dimensional array of the coordinates:

[-72.78630766033722,41.767349642115724]

Both points and outlines are held in an array. I would like to ultimately end up with an array of all of the coordinate pairs, such as:

 [[[-72.68639118392117,41.66733032827929],[-72.68630366033922,41.667449647115724],[-72.78630766033722,41.767349642115724], ...]]

What I've Tried

First, I tried to get all of the coordinates, where geometries is my array of outlines and points:

var coordinates = geometries.map(function(outline) {return outline.geometry.coordinates});

Not surprisingly, this creates the following array:

[[[[-72.68639118392117,41.66733032827929],[-72.68630366033922,41.667449647115724], ...]], [-72.78630766033722,41.767349642115724]]

Flattening this array would cause loss of the coordinate pairs being paired, so I'm not entirely sure how to go about this. Any ideas?

  • 1
    arr.reduce((a,b)=>a.concat(b)) flattens 1 level, which fixes the last example – dandavis Jul 14 '16 at 20:21
  • Are you able to identify outlines vs points, for example, using instanceof? Does geometries contain only outlines or is it mixed? – arcyqwerty Jul 14 '16 at 20:21
  • @dandavis I'm getting a.conct is not a function? – Sara Tibbetts Jul 14 '16 at 20:24
  • 2
    @dandavis: wouldn't that result in [[a,b], [c,d], e, f] where e and f aren't paired? – arcyqwerty Jul 14 '16 at 20:24
  • @arcyqwerty: mmm. yeah, probably. OP should pop() out that last one then flatten, then push – dandavis Jul 14 '16 at 20:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about this?

var geometries = [
    // point
    {
        geometry: {
            coordinates: [1, 2],
        },
    },

    // outline
    {
        geometry: {
            coordinates: [
                [
                    [3, 4],
                    [5, 6],
                ],
            ],
        },
    },
];

var coordinates = geometries.map(function(outline) {
  var coords = outline.geometry.coordinates;
  if (typeof coords[0] === 'number') {
    return [coords];
  } else {
    return coords[0];
  }
}).reduce(function (prev, next) {
    return prev.concat(next);
}, []);

console.log(coordinates);

// Output:
// [ [ 1, 2 ], [ 3, 4 ], [ 5, 6 ] ]
  • I had to do return [[coords]]; but it works! – Sara Tibbetts Jul 14 '16 at 20:40
  • @tibsar See my edit if you didn't already. :-) – smarx Jul 14 '16 at 20:41
  • That seems to result in an array of the format: [[[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6] ... ], [[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6] ... ], [1, 2]] – Sara Tibbetts Jul 14 '16 at 20:50
  • 1
    Well, my code including input and output is above. Perhaps your input looks different from mine? – smarx Jul 14 '16 at 20:51
  • 1
    Ah. I'd suggest else { return coords[0]; } then. Unless, of course, you want output like [ [ [ 1, 2 ], [ 3, 4 ], [ 5, 6 ] ] ]. – smarx Jul 14 '16 at 20:53

One approach is to standardize the coordinate outputs. If outlines give you an array of paired coordinates, you can have points do the same by wrapping it as a single element array.

Outline

[[a, b], [c, d], [e, f], ...]

Point

[[a, b]]

such that when you combine them they are all of the same shape / dimensionality. At that point, you can flatten once using @dandavis' technique.


If you're able to use instanceof to determine whether your Object is an outline or point, you could use the following.

var coordinates = geometries.map(function(outline_or_point) {
  return outline_or_point instanceof outline ? outline.geometry.coordinates : [point.geometry.coordinates];
});

If instanceof isn't possible, you could do some duck typing, for example, by checking if outline_or_point is an array or a number.

var coordinates = geometries.map(function(outline_or_point) {
  return typeof outline_or_point[0] == 'number' ? [point.geometry.coordinates] : outline.geometry.coordinates;
});

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