6

I have a macro to repeat macros that I use to fill arrays with default values in compile time:

const int array [512] = 
{
     MACRO_REPEAT(512, -2) // this repeats -2, 512  times
     [4] = 10,
     [5] = 2,
     ...
}

The macro repeat will expand to MACRO_REPEAT_512, but now I wanted to use other macros as the array size, like:

#define ARRAY_LENGTH 512
const int array [ARRAY_LENGTH ] = 
{
    MACRO_REPEAT(ARRAY_LENGTH , -2) // this repeats -2, 512  times
    [4] = 10,
    [5] = 2,
     ...
 }

But this expands to MACRO_REPEAT_ARRAY_LENGTH, doesn't expand ARRAY_LENGTH value before concatenating it. Other example would be for multi-dimensional arrays, which involves more levels of expansion:

#define X 512
#define Y 512

const int array [X][Y] = 
{
    MACRO_REPEAT(X*Y , -2) // this repeats -2, 512  times
    [4] = 10,
    [5] = 2,
     ...
 }

This will expand to MARO_REPEAT_X*Y. So, is there a way to expand those values to the final numerical value before concatenating it to other macros?

  • Why not simply use a loop or memset()? Yes, those work at run time, but achieve the desired effect relatively easily. – Peter Jul 15 '16 at 13:01
  • 2
    GCC has an extension that allows you to initialize a range of elements to the same value, something like int array[ARRAY_LENGTH] = { [0 ... 3] = -2, [4] = 10, [5] = 2, [6 ... ARRAY_LENGTH - 1] = -2, }; – Ian Abbott Jul 15 '16 at 13:09
  • 1
    @Peter I know that but I'm working in an embedded system and I would like to store it in flash (updated question with const qualifier) – rnunes Jul 15 '16 at 13:10
  • 1
    @IanAbbott I didin't know about that one, even if it's not ANSI C I don't mind at all, GCC it's fine for me. Can you make a reply with that one so that I can put it as the right answer? – rnunes Jul 15 '16 at 13:12
  • 1
    Can you use boost preprocessor? If yes then, for example, BOOST_PP_REPEAT looks interesting. – mvidelgauz Jul 15 '16 at 14:09
1

You can solve the MACRO_REPEAT(ARRAY_LENGTH , -2) case by changing the definition of MACRO_REPEAT to use 2 stage expansion, ie do not use token pasting in MACRO_REPEAT itself, invoke another macro that does.

Not that this will only work as expected if ARRAY_LENGTH is defined as a single number token and if there is a macro definition for this specific size.

You cannot handle the more general MACRO_REPEAT(X*Y , -2) case with the standard C preprocessor.

You can use the gcc extension to initialize simple arrays:

#define MACRO_REPEAT(n, e)  [ 0 ... (n)-1 ] = (e),

But this method cannot be used to handle multidimensional arrays such as MACRO_REPEAT(X*Y , -2).

You could try this:

#define MACRO_REPEAT(n, e)  [ 0 ... (n)-1 ] = (e),
#define X 512
#define Y 512

const int array[X][Y] = { MACRO_REPEAT(X, { MACRO_REPEAT(Y, -2) }) };

But the use of the C preprocessor just obfuscates the intent. If you decide to rely on gcc extensions, just use them directly.

  • I know, but a multidimensional array with X columns and Y rows it's just another way to watch a X*Y single dimension array. I believe you can do stuff like int array[1][2] = {first, second} and first will be stored in [0][0] and the other in [0][1] – rnunes Jul 15 '16 at 13:34
  • @munes: you are correct: if you can expand the macro to a sequence of 262144 initializers, it will work. Try MACRO_REPEAT(512, { MACRO_REPEAT(512, -2) }) with your current definition of the macro. – chqrlie Jul 15 '16 at 13:37
  • @munes: I'm not surprised, either a problem with the actual macro definition or a limit on macro expansion. – chqrlie Jul 15 '16 at 14:31
1

I'm not sure if this counts as the "right" answer as it doesn't answer the OP's question directly, but it is a suggested workaround for the problem. It also is not standard C as it makes use of a GCC extension.

In the GNU C Compiler (gcc), a range of array elements can be initialized to the same value using the form [FIRST ... LAST] = VALUE. It also appears to allow more than one designated initializer for an element, so it is possible to initialize a range of elements to the same value and then initialize elements contained within that range to different values, something like this:

#define ARRAY_LENGTH 512
const int array[ARRAY_LENGTH] =
{
    [0 ... ARRAY_LENGTH - 1] = -2,
    [4] = 10,
    [5] = 2,
    /* ... */
};
  • you know what, you're right about this not being the answer to the original question (sohould have made it broader). sorry about the repost request, chqrlie answer it's closer to the right answer – rnunes Jul 15 '16 at 13:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.