110

With almost all code I write, I am often dealing with set reduction problems on collections that ultimately end up with naive "if" conditions inside of them. Here's a simple example:

for(int i=0; i<myCollection.size(); i++)
{
     if (myCollection[i] == SOMETHING)
     {
           DoStuff();
     }
}

With functional languages, I can solve the problem by reducing the collection to another collection (easily) and then perform all operations on my reduced set. In pseudocode:

newCollection <- myCollection where <x=true
map DoStuff newCollection

And in other C variants, like C#, I could reduce with a where clause like

foreach (var x in myCollection.Where(c=> c == SOMETHING)) 
{
   DoStuff();
}

Or better (at least to my eyes)

myCollection.Where(c=>c == Something).ToList().ForEach(d=> DoStuff(d));

Admittedly, I am doing a lot of paradigm mixing and subjective/opinion based style, but I can't help but feel that I am missing something really fundamental that could allow me to use this preferred technique with C++. Could someone enlighten me?

  • 7
    Out of C++ standard library functionality, you can try std::copy_if, but the selections aren't lazy – milleniumbug Jul 15 '16 at 15:03
  • 13
    You may be interested in range-v3. It should also be coming to C++ as a TS and hopefully standardized in a future release. – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Jul 15 '16 at 15:05
  • 12
    I feel the need to point out that the if inside a for you mention is not only pretty much functionally equivalent to the other examples but would also probably be faster in a lot of cases. Also for someone who claims to like functional style, what you're promoting seems to go against functional programming's dearly beloved concept of purity since DoStuff clearly has side effcets. – Pharap Jul 15 '16 at 22:02
  • 59
    I've never really understood why people link combining all the logic onto a single line makes it look somehow better or more readable. Your C++ snippet at the very top is by far the most readable to me out of all of your possibilities. And since efficiency won't be changed, I cannot understand why you would prefer not to write that, unless you are being paid by number of lines of code that you delete. – Cody Gray Jul 16 '16 at 1:02
  • 10
    @CodyGray Agreed: it' just syntactic sugar. And the question title is misleading, because it is very different avoiding branching and hiding it under abstraction. – edmz Jul 16 '16 at 9:06

11 Answers 11

97

IMHO it's more straight forward and more readable to use a for loop with an if inside it. However, if this is annoying for you, you could use a for_each_if like the one below:

template<typename Iter, typename Pred, typename Op> 
void for_each_if(Iter first, Iter last, Pred p, Op op) {
  while(first != last) {
    if (p(*first)) op(*first);
    ++first;
  }
}

Usecase:

std::vector<int> v {10, 2, 10, 3};
for_each_if(v.begin(), v.end(), [](int i){ return i > 5; }, [](int &i){ ++i; });

Live Demo

  • 10
    That is exceptionally clever. I will also agree that it isn't straight forward and I'll probably just use if conditions when programming C++ that is consumed by others. But that is exactly what I need for my own personal use! :) – Darkenor Jul 15 '16 at 15:19
  • 13
    @Default Passing iterator pairs rather than containers is both more flexible and idiomatic C++. – Mark B Jul 15 '16 at 15:24
  • 8
    @Slava, in general ranges won't reduce the number of algorithms. For example, you still need find_if and find whether they work on ranges or pairs of iterators. (There are a few exceptions, such as for_each and for_each_n). The way to avoid writing new algos for every sneeze is to use different operations with the existing algos, e.g instead of for_each_if embed the condition into the callable passed to for_each, e.g. for_each(first, last, [&](auto& x) { if (cond(x)) f(x); }); – Jonathan Wakely Jul 15 '16 at 15:49
  • 9
    I'm gonna have to agree with the first sentence: The standard for-if solution is much more readable and easier to work with. I think the lambda syntax and the use of a template defined somewhere else just to handle a simple loop would irritate or possibly confuse other devs. You're sacrificing locality and performance for... what? Being able to write something in one line? – user1354557 Jul 15 '16 at 16:50
  • 43
    Cough @Darkenor, generally "exceptionally clever" programming is to be avoided because it annoys the crap out of everyone else including your future self. – Ryan Jul 15 '16 at 17:15
48

Boost provides ranges that can be used w/ range-based for. Ranges have the advantage that they don't copy the underlying data structure, they merely provide a 'view' (that is, begin(), end() for the range and operator++(), operator==() for the iterator). This might be of your interest: http://www.boost.org/libs/range/doc/html/range/reference/adaptors/reference/filtered.html

#include <boost/range/adaptor/filtered.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct is_even
{
    bool operator()( int x ) const { return x % 2 == 0; }
};

int main(int argc, const char* argv[])
{
    using namespace boost::adaptors;

    std::vector<int> myCollection{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};

    for( int i: myCollection | filtered( is_even() ) )
    {
        std::cout << i;
    }
}
  • 1
    May I suggest to use the OPs example instead, i.e. is_even => condition, input=> myCollection etc. – Default Jul 15 '16 at 15:15
  • This is a pretty excellent answer and definitely what I'm looking to do. I'm going to hold off on accepting unless someone can come up with a standard compliant way to do it that uses lazy/deferred execution. Upvoted. – Darkenor Jul 15 '16 at 15:17
  • 5
    @Darkenor: If Boost is a problem for you (for ex., you're banned to use it due to company policy & manager wisdom), I can come up with a simplified definition of filtered() for you - that said, it's better to use a supported lib than some ad-hoc code. – lorro Jul 15 '16 at 15:20
  • Totally agree with you. I accepted it because the standard-compliant way that came first because the question was geared to C++ itself, not the boost library. But this is really excellent. Also - yes, I have sadly worked in many-a-place that banned Boost for absurd reasons... – Darkenor Jul 15 '16 at 15:22
  • I want to delete this, but stupid stackoverflow – Lee Clagett Jul 19 '16 at 22:37
44

Instead of creating a new algorithm, as the accepted answer does, you can use an existing one with a function that applies the condition:

std::for_each(first, last, [](auto&& x){ if (cond(x)) { ... } });

Or if you really want a new algorithm, at least reuse for_each there instead of duplicating the iteration logic:

template<typename Iter, typename Pred, typename Op> 
  void
  for_each_if(Iter first, Iter last, Pred p, Op op) {
    std::for_each(first, last, [&](auto& x) { if (p(x)) op(x); });
  }
  • Much better and clearer for using the standard library. – Jon Harper Jul 16 '16 at 10:28
  • 4
    Because std::for-each(first, last, [&](auto& x) {if (p(x)) op(x); }); is totally simpler than for (Iter x = first; x != last; x++) if (p(x)) op(x);}? – user253751 Jul 17 '16 at 10:44
  • 2
    @immibis reusing the standard library has other benefits, such as iterator validity checking, or (in C++17) being much easier to parallelize, simply by adding one more argument: std::for_each(std::execution::par, first, last, ...); How easy is it to add those things to a handwritten loop? – Jonathan Wakely Jul 17 '16 at 12:32
  • 1
    #pragma omp parallel for – Mark K Cowan Jul 18 '16 at 10:18
  • 2
    @mark sorry, some random quirk of your source code or build chain made that annoyingly fragile parallel non-standard compiler extension generate zero performance boost with no diagnostic. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jul 18 '16 at 13:42
21

The idea of avoiding

for(...)
    if(...)

constructs as an antipattern is too broad.

It is completely fine to process multiple items that match a certain expression from inside a loop, and the code cannot get much clearer than that. If the processing grows too large to fit on screen, that is a good reason to use a subroutine, but still the conditional is best placed inside the loop, i.e.

for(...)
    if(...)
        do_process(...);

is vastly preferable to

for(...)
    maybe_process(...);

It becomes an antipattern when only one element will match, because then it would be clearer to first search for the element, and perform the processing outside of the loop.

for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i)
    if(i == 5)

is an extreme and obvious example of this. More subtle, and thus more common, is a factory pattern like

for(creator &c : creators)
    if(c.name == requested_name)
    {
        unique_ptr<object> obj = c.create_object();
        obj.owner = this;
        return std::move(obj);
    }

This is hard to read, because it isn't obvious that the body code will be executed once only. In this case, it would be better to separate the lookup:

creator &lookup(string const &requested_name)
{
    for(creator &c : creators)
        if(c.name == requested_name)
            return c;
}

creator &c = lookup(requested_name);
unique_ptr obj = c.create_object();

There is still an if within a for, but from the context it becomes clear what it does, there is no need to change this code unless the lookup changes (e.g. to a map), and it is immediately clear that create_object() is called only once, because it is not inside a loop.

  • I like this, as a thoughtful and balanced overview, even if it in a sense refuses to answer the question posed. I find that the for( range ){ if( condition ){ action } }-style makes it easy to read things one chunk at a time and only uses knowledge of the basic language constructs. – PJTraill Jul 19 '16 at 19:43
  • @PJTraill, the way the question was phrased reminded me of Raymond Chen's rant against the for-if antipattern, which has been cargo-culted and somehow became an absolute. I totally agree that for(...) if(...) { ... } is often the best choice (that's why I qualified the recommendation to split the action into a subroutine). – Simon Richter Jul 20 '16 at 0:16
  • 1
    Thanks for the link, which clarified things for me: the name “for-if” is misleading, and should be something like “for-all-if-one” or “lookup-avoidance”. It reminds me of the way Abstraction inversion was described by Wikipedia in 2005 as when one “creates simple constructs on top of complex (ones)” — until I rewrote it! Actually I wouldn’t even rush to fix the lookup-process-exit form of for(…)if(…)… if it was the only place lookup occurred. – PJTraill Jul 20 '16 at 9:49
17

Here is a quick relatively minimal filter function.

It takes a predicate. It returns a function object that takes an iterable.

It returns an iterable that can be used in a for(:) loop.

template<class It>
struct range_t {
  It b, e;
  It begin() const { return b; }
  It end() const { return e; }
  bool empty() const { return begin()==end(); }
};
template<class It>
range_t<It> range( It b, It e ) { return {std::move(b), std::move(e)}; }

template<class It, class F>
struct filter_helper:range_t<It> {
  F f;
  void advance() {
    while(true) {
      (range_t<It>&)*this = range( std::next(this->begin()), this->end() );
      if (this->empty())
        return;
      if (f(*this->begin()))
        return;
    }
  }
  filter_helper(range_t<It> r, F fin):
    range_t<It>(r), f(std::move(fin))
  {
      while(true)
      {
          if (this->empty()) return;
          if (f(*this->begin())) return;
          (range_t<It>&)*this = range( std::next(this->begin()), this->end() );
      }
  }
};

template<class It, class F>
struct filter_psuedo_iterator {
  using iterator_category=std::input_iterator_tag;
  filter_helper<It, F>* helper = nullptr;
  bool m_is_end = true;
  bool is_end() const {
    return m_is_end || !helper || helper->empty();
  }

  void operator++() {
    helper->advance();
  }
  typename std::iterator_traits<It>::reference
  operator*() const {
    return *(helper->begin());
  }
  It base() const {
      if (!helper) return {};
      if (is_end()) return helper->end();
      return helper->begin();
  }
  friend bool operator==(filter_psuedo_iterator const& lhs, filter_psuedo_iterator const& rhs) {
    if (lhs.is_end() && rhs.is_end()) return true;
    if (lhs.is_end() || rhs.is_end()) return false;
    return lhs.helper->begin() == rhs.helper->begin();
  }
  friend bool operator!=(filter_psuedo_iterator const& lhs, filter_psuedo_iterator const& rhs) {
    return !(lhs==rhs);
  }
};
template<class It, class F>
struct filter_range:
  private filter_helper<It, F>,
  range_t<filter_psuedo_iterator<It, F>>
{
  using helper=filter_helper<It, F>;
  using range=range_t<filter_psuedo_iterator<It, F>>;

  using range::begin; using range::end; using range::empty;

  filter_range( range_t<It> r, F f ):
    helper{{r}, std::forward<F>(f)},
    range{ {this, false}, {this, true} }
  {}
};

template<class F>
auto filter( F&& f ) {
    return [f=std::forward<F>(f)](auto&& r)
    {
        using std::begin; using std::end;
        using iterator = decltype(begin(r));
        return filter_range<iterator, std::decay_t<decltype(f)>>{
            range(begin(r), end(r)), f
        };
    };
};

I took short cuts. A real library should make real iterators, not the for(:)-qualifying pseudo-fascades I did.

At point of use, it looks like this:

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> test = {1,2,3,4,5};
  for( auto i: filter([](auto x){return x%2;})( test ) )
    std::cout << i << '\n';
}

which is pretty nice, and prints

1
3
5

Live example.

There is a proposed addition to C++ called Rangesv3 which does this kind of thing and more. boost also has filter ranges/iterators available. boost also has helpers that make writing the above much shorter.

15

One style that gets used enough to mention, but hasn't been mentioned yet, is:

for(int i=0; i<myCollection.size(); i++) {
  if (myCollection[i] != SOMETHING)
    continue;

  DoStuff();
}

Advantages:

  • Doesn't change the indentation level of DoStuff(); when condition complexity increases. Logically, DoStuff(); should be at the top-level of the for loop, and it is.
  • Immediately makes it clear that the loop iterates over the SOMETHINGs of the collection, without requiring the reader to verify that there is nothing after the closing } of the if block.
  • Doesn't require any libraries or helper macros or functions.

Disadvantages:

  • continue, like other flow control statements, gets misused in ways that lead to hard-to-follow code so much that some people are opposed to any use of them: there is a valid style of coding that some follow that avoids continue, that avoids break other than in a switch, that avoids return other than at the end of a function.
  • 3
    I would argue that in a for loop that runs to many lines, a two-line "if not, continue" is much clearer, logical, and readable. Immediately saying, "skip this if" after the for statement reads well and, as you said, does not indent the remaining functional aspects of the loop. If the continue is further down, however, some clarity is sacrificed (i.e. if some operation will always be performed before the if statement). – Jon Harper Jul 16 '16 at 10:37
11
for(auto const &x: myCollection) if(x == something) doStuff();

Looks pretty much like a C++-specific for comprehension to me. To you?

  • I don't think auto keyword was present before c++11 so I would not say it is very classical c++. If I may ask a question here in the comment, would "auto const" tell the compiler that it can rearrange all elements as it wants? Maybe it will be easier for the compiler to plan to avoid branching if that is the case. – mathreadler Jul 17 '16 at 9:50
  • 1
    @mathreadler The sooner people stop worrying about "classical c++", the better. C++11 was a macroevolutionary event for the language & is 5 years old: it should be the minimum we strive for. Anyway, the OP tagged that and C++14 (even better!). No, auto const has no bearing whatsoever on iteration order. If you look up ranged-based for, you'll see that it basically does a standard loop from begin() to end() with implicit dereferencing. There's no way it could break the ordering guarantees (if any) of the container being iterated over; it would've been laughed off the face of the Earth – underscore_d Jul 17 '16 at 19:34
  • 1
    @mathreadler, actually it was, it just had quite a different meaning. What was not present is range-for... and any other distinct C++11 feature. What I meant here was that range-fors, std::futures, std::functions, even those anonymous closures are very well C++ish in the syntax; every language has its own parlance and when incorporatin new features it tries to make them mimic the old well-known syntax. – bipll Jul 17 '16 at 21:36
  • @underscore_d, a compiler is allowed to perform any transformations provided the as-if rule is obeyed, isn't it? – bipll Jul 17 '16 at 21:39
  • 1
    Hmmm, and what can possibly be meant by that? – bipll Jul 20 '16 at 18:30
7

If DoStuff() would be dependent on i somehow in the future then I'd propose this guaranteed branch-free bit-masking variant.

unsigned int times = 0;
const int kSize = sizeof(unsigned int)*8;
for(int i = 0; i < myCollection.size()/kSize; i++){
  unsigned int mask = 0;
  for (int j = 0; j<kSize; j++){
    mask |= (myCollection[i*kSize+j]==SOMETHING) << j;
  }
  times+=popcount(mask);
}

for(int i=0;i<times;i++)
   DoStuff();

Where popcount is any function doing a population count ( count number of bits = 1 ). There will be some freedom to put more advanced constraints with i and their neighbors. If that is not needed we can strip the inner loop and remake the outer loop

for(int i = 0; i < myCollection.size(); i++)
  times += (myCollection[i]==SOMETHING);

followed by a

for(int i=0;i<times;i++)
   DoStuff();
6

Also, if you don't care reordering the collection, std::partition is cheap.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

void DoStuff(int i)
{
    std::cout << i << '\n';
}

int main()
{
    using namespace std::placeholders;

    std::vector<int> v {1, 2, 5, 0, 9, 5, 5};
    const int SOMETHING = 5;

    std::for_each(v.begin(),
                  std::partition(v.begin(), v.end(),
                                 std::bind(std::equal_to<int> {}, _1, SOMETHING)), // some condition
                  DoStuff); // action
}
  • But std::partition reorders the container. – celtschk Jul 16 '16 at 15:49
  • @celtschk yes, clarified.. – Loreto Jul 16 '16 at 19:41
5

I am in awe of the complexity of the above solutions. I was going to suggest a simple #define foreach(a,b,c,d) for(a; b; c)if(d) but it has a few obvious deficits, for example, you have to remember to use commas instead of semicolons in your loop, and you can't use the comma operator in a or c.

#include <list>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std; 

#define foreach(a,b,c,d) for(a; b; c)if(d)

int main(){
  list<int> a;

  for(int i=0; i<10; i++)
    a.push_back(i);

  for(auto i=a.begin(); i!=a.end(); i++)
    if((*i)&1)
      cout << *i << ' ';
  cout << endl;

  foreach(auto i=a.begin(), i!=a.end(), i++, (*i)&1)
    cout << *i << ' ';
  cout << endl;

  return 0;
}
  • 2
    The complexity of some answers is only high because they first show a reusable generic method (which you would do only once) and then use it. Not effective if you have one loop with an if condition in your whole application but very effective if it happens a thousand times. – gnasher729 Jul 17 '16 at 12:21
  • Like most suggestions, this make it harder, not easier, to identify the range and the selection condition. And the use of a macro increases uncertainty about when (and how often) expressions are evaluated, even if there are no surprises here. – PJTraill Jul 19 '16 at 19:46
2

Another solution in case the i:s are important. This one builds a list that fills in the indexes of which to call doStuff() for. Once again the main point is to avoid the branching and trade it for pipelineable arithmetic costs.

int buffer[someSafeSize];
int cnt = 0; // counter to keep track where we are in list.
for( int i = 0; i < container.size(); i++ ){
   int lDecision = (container[i] == SOMETHING);
   buffer[cnt] = lDecision*i + (1-lDecision)*buffer[cnt];
   cnt += lDecision;
}

for( int i=0; i<cnt; i++ )
   doStuff(buffer[i]); // now we could pass the index or a pointer as an argument.

The "magical" line is the buffer loading line that arithmetically calculates wether to keep the value and stay in position or to count up position and add value. So we trade away a potential branch for some logics and arithmetics and maybe some cache hits. A typical scenario when this would be useful is if doStuff() does a small amount of pipelineable calculations and any branch in between calls could interrupt those pipelines.

Then just loop over the buffer and run doStuff() until we reach cnt. This time we will have the current i stored in the buffer so we can use it in the call to doStuff() if we would need to.

protected by Niall Jul 23 '16 at 19:30

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