I just started working on Spock testing framework for Java applications. I don't have previous experience on Groovy. How do we inject mock into the constructor using Spock framework? Below is my code and test example.

public class ResourceClass {
    private final IDynamoDBMapper factory = new DefaultDynamoDBClientFactory(DynamoDBConfig.fromProperties()).mapperClient();

    private ServiceClass service;

    @Inject
    public ResourceClass(ServiceClass service) {
        this.service = service;
    }
}

And I tried to create test class like below.

class ResourceClassTest extends Specification {
ResourceClass eventsResource
ServiceClass service

def setup() {
    service = Mock(ServiceClass)
    eventsResource = new ResourceClass(service)
}

But I am getting below exception at eventsResource = new ResourceClass(service)

java.lang.NullPointerException: Domain name must be specified.

at java.util.Objects.requireNonNull(Objects.java:228)

Any suggestions please?

The issue is not with 'injecting' the mock into the constructor of the ResourceClass, as you are just invoking the constructor passing in the mock. The reason this exception happens is because of this field declaration + initialiazation:

private final IDynamoDBMapper factory = new DefaultDynamoDBClientFactory(DynamoDBConfig.fromProperties()).mapperClient();

Initialization of the factory field will happen before the constructor is executed (it will be actually copied into the beginning of the constructor during compilation).

Either you can check why the initialization of factory fails (like checking how DynamoDBConfig.fromProperties() works and where the domain property for dynamo db connection should be specified) or you can modify the source code to inject the factory object into the Resource class the same way as you do with the service, through the constructor, then in the test pass a mock of IDynamoDBMapper into the service constructor:

public class ResourceClass {
    private final IDynamoDBMapper factory;
    private ServiceClass service;

    @Inject
    public ResourceClass(ServiceClass service, IDynamoDBMapper factory) {
        this.service = service;
        this.factory = factory;
    }
}

class ResourceClassTest extends Specification {
    ResourceClass eventsResource
    ServiceClass service
    IDynamoDBMapper mapper

    def setup() {
        service = Mock(ServiceClass)
        mapper = Mock(IDynamoDBMapper)
        eventsResource = new ResourceClass(service, mapper)
    }
}

With the second solution you get more control over testing the Resource class, but the first solution should be easier

  • Thank you Gergely. I changed the source code to inject DynamoDBMapper into the resource class. This happens only when using Spock or with mockito also? – vamsi Jul 17 '16 at 18:00
  • This happens when running the Spock tests but it is not a spock issue, but that the classpath is usually different when you run the application and when you run the tests. So if you have the dynamo db configuration file on the classpath when running the app but don't when running the tests – Gergely Toth Jul 18 '16 at 8:48

Either you need to mock your DefaultDynamoDBClientFactory.mapperClient() somehow or make it injectable, otherwise it will look for real instantiation and gonna fail.

public class ResourceClass {
    private IDynamoDBMapper factory;
    private ServiceClass service;

    @Inject
    public ResourceClass(IDynamoDBMapper factory, ServiceClass service) {
        this.factory = factory;
        this.service = service;
    }
}

Then you should be able to unit test your resourceClass in a fancy way as below,

class ResourceClassSpec extends Specification {
    ResourceClass eventsResource

    def setup() {
        eventsResource = new ResourceClass(factory: Mock(IDynamoDBMapper), service: Mock(ServiceClass))
    }

    def 'test does something' () {
      given: 'given x'
          //
      when: 'when you call some method of resourceClass'
          //
      then: 'what you expect'
          // 
          1 == 2
    }
}

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