3

I want to calculate means over several columns for each row in my dataframe containing missing values, and place results in a new column called 'means.' Here's my dataframe:

df <- data.frame(A=c(3,4,5),B=c(0,6,8),C=c(9,NA,1))
  A B  C
1 3 0  9
2 4 6 NA
3 5 8  1

The code below successfully accomplishes the task if columns have no missing values, such as columns A and B.

 library(dplyr)
 df %>%
 rowwise() %>%
 mutate(means=mean(A:B, na.rm=T))

     A     B     C   means
  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
1     3     0     9   1.5
2     4     6    NA   5.0
3     5     8     1   6.5

However, if a column has missing values, such as C, then I get an error:

> df %>% rowwise() %>% mutate(means=mean(A:C, na.rm=T))
Error: NA/NaN argument

Ideally, I'd like to implement it with dplyr.

3 Answers 3

9
df %>% 
  mutate(means=rowMeans(., na.rm=TRUE))

The . is a "pronoun" that references the data frame df that was piped into mutate.

  A B  C    means
1 3 0  9 4.000000
2 4 6 NA 5.000000
3 5 8  1 4.666667

You can also select only specific columns to include, using all the usual methods (column names, indices, grep, etc.).

df %>% 
  mutate(means=rowMeans(.[ , c("A","C")], na.rm=TRUE))
  A B  C means
1 3 0  9     6
2 4 6 NA     4
3 5 8  1     3
2
  • That works! The help for rowwise() says "to allow you to work with list-variables in summarise and mutate without having to use [[1]]." However, looks like there is no way to avoid square brackets.
    – Irakli
    Jul 16, 2016 at 3:37
  • rowwise is also notoriously slow.
    – eipi10
    Jul 16, 2016 at 3:39
3

It is simple to accomplish in base R as well:

cbind(df, "means"=rowMeans(df, na.rm=TRUE))
  A B  C    means
1 3 0  9 4.000000
2 4 6 NA 5.000000
3 5 8  1 4.666667

The rowMeans performs the calculation.and allows for the na.rm argument to skip missing values, while cbind allows you to bind the mean and whatever name you want to the the data.frame, df.

2

Regarding the error in OP's code, we can use the concatenate function c to get those elements as a single vector and then do the mean as mean can take only a single argument.

df %>%
    rowwise() %>% 
    mutate(means = mean(c(A, B, C), na.rm = TRUE))
#     A     B     C    means 
#  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>    <dbl>
#1     3     0     9 4.000000
#2     4     6    NA 5.000000
#3     5     8     1 4.666667

Also, we can use rowMeans with transform

transform(df, means = rowMeans(df, na.rm = TRUE))
#  A B  C    means
#1 3 0  9 4.000000
#2 4 6 NA 5.000000
#3 5 8  1 4.666667

Or using data.table

library(data.table)
setDT(df)[, means := rowMeans(.SD, na.rm = TRUE)]
3
  • Thank you for explaining the error, @akrun. Your answer with rowwise() is elegant. But for a large range of columns, say A to Z, is there a way to concatenate without listing each individually in the c function?
    – Irakli
    Jul 17, 2016 at 15:03
  • @Irakli Inside the dplyr mutate, I find other options are not working i.e. unlist and stuff. So, I would go by the eipi10's solution with rowMeans as it is fast and uses dplyr
    – akrun
    Jul 17, 2016 at 15:05
  • 1
    that explains why I had so much trouble with mutate & mean. Thank you, @akrun!
    – Irakli
    Jul 17, 2016 at 15:08

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