111

I've copied my project to a clean Windows 10 machine with only Visual Studio 2015 Community and SQL Server 2016 Express installed. There are no other framework versions installed apart from those installed with Windows 10 and VS2015 or SQL Server.

When I try to start the WebApi project I get the message:

Could not load file or assembly "System.Net.Http, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" or one of its dependencies. The system cannot find the file specified.

The project's packages include:

<package id="Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi" version="5.2.3" targetFramework="net45" />
<package id="Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Client" version="5.2.3" targetFramework="net45" />
<package id="Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Core" version="5.2.3" targetFramework="net45" />
<package id="Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Tracing" version="5.2.3" targetFramework="net45" />
<package id="Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.WebHost" version="5.2.3" targetFramework="net45" />

After building the project with .NET Framework 4.6.1, System.Net.Http the file is not found in the bin folder.

The file's path points to:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.6.1\System.Net.Http.dll

The file's path of System.Net.Http.Formatting points to:

C:\Development\MyApp\packages\Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Client.5.2.3\lib\net45\System.Net.Http.Formatting.dll

Should the whole project target 4.5.1 or is there another way to reference the right assemblies?

12 Answers 12

195

Changing the binding information in my web.config (or app.config) - while a "hack" in my view, allows you to move forward with your project after a NuGet package update whacks your application and gives you the System.Net.Http error.

Set newVersion="4.0.0.0"

<dependentAssembly>
    <assemblyIdentity name="System.Net.Http" publicKeyToken="b03f5f7f11d50a3a" culture="neutral" />
    <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-4.1.1.0" newVersion="4.0.0.0" />
</dependentAssembly>
  • 4
    I deployed to Azure, once, with no issue, then 15 min later, a successive deployment gave me the exact error stated in the O.P. and tweaking the web.config on the server with this precise answer fixed my issue. But, I have no idea why it ever worked the first time. I didn't mess with my dependencies between deployments. – bkwdesign Apr 21 '17 at 17:20
  • 1
    solved my issues, thanks a lot, 1000 thumbs up it has been a while trying to solve this – user1505015 Jul 5 '17 at 12:53
  • 6
    Good job. I can see what happened, I installed a package in a base domain project that I'm pretty sure had System.Net.Http nuget installed (probably of the higher 4.1.x version), and as soon as I did that I got these warnings everywhere. This fixed the problem for the web project, but the advice above of someone to reference the nuget package for that in all of the projects removed all of the warnings. Am I the only one who is concerned about the mix of the old and new .NET though when it comes to references? It makes me afraid to reference typically local dlls as nuget packages (dll hell). – Nicholas Petersen Nov 22 '17 at 22:10
  • 1
    Here is answer from Microsoft as to why this is the correct way: github.com/dotnet/corefx/issues/25773 – ghanashyaml Sep 18 '18 at 5:48
  • 6
    Removing the binding redirect completely worked for me. – sbkrogers Jan 20 at 19:15
51

Follow the following steps,

  1. Update visual studio to latest version (it matters)
  2. Remove all binding redirects from web.config
  3. Add this to the .csproj file:

    <PropertyGroup>
      <AutoGenerateBindingRedirects>true</AutoGenerateBindingRedirects>
      <GenerateBindingRedirectsOutputType>true</GenerateBindingRedirectsOutputType>
    </PropertyGroup>
    
  4. Build the project
  5. In the bin folder there should be a (WebAppName).dll.config file
  6. It should have redirects in it, copy these to the web.config
  7. Remove the above snipped from the .csproj file

It should work

  • 1
    Now im getting Could not load file or assembly 'Newtonsoft.Json, Version=6.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=30ad4fe6b2a6aeed' or one of its dependencies. The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040) – EK_AllDay Aug 5 '18 at 22:45
  • 2
    You must remember to copy across the binding redirects from the generated file, so first time you will get the above error, but goto the bin folder to get the generated (webappname).dll.config as described above, copy the entire list of redirects into your web.config, then re-compile. This really helped me, make sure you use the nuget consolidation tool to clean up as many references as you can first though. – Chris Schaller Aug 28 '18 at 0:51
  • 3
    Amazing. This actually worked for me. @EK_AllDay You have to copy the AssemblyRedirects back into the original web.config. – David De Sloovere Sep 11 '18 at 7:34
25

In one of my projects there was a nuget packages with higher version of System.Net.Http. and in my startup project there reference to System.Net.Http v 4.0.0 , i just installed System.Net.Http nuget package in my startup project and the problem solved

  • I have three projects in a solution - let's call them A, B and C. A is the startup project, and has nothing to do with either B or C. C is a test project for B. Running my tests in C failed, because I didn't have a reference (System.Net.Http) project A had. – Rasmus Bækgaard Jun 24 at 13:41
8

If you have multiple projects in your solution, then right-click on the solution icon in Visual Studio and select 'Manage NuGet Packages for Solution', then click on the fourth tab 'Consolidate' to consolidate all your projects to the same version of the DLLs. This will give you a list of referenced assemblies to consolidate. Click on each item in the list, then click install in the tab that appears to the right.

  • 1
    Combine this with the answer from @sajeetharan about using the AutoGenerateBindingRedirects, it seems that older versions either of VS or nuget packages may leave incorrect binding statements. A good clean out can help a lot. – Chris Schaller Aug 28 '18 at 0:54
7

Change following:

<bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-4.1.1.2" newVersion="4.1.1.2" />

with the following:

<bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-4.1.1.2" newVersion="4.0.0.0" />

in web.config

6

The above bind-redirect did not work for me so I commented out the reference to System.Net.Http in web.config. Everything seems to work OK without it.

  <system.web>
    <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.7.2">
      <assemblies>
        <!--<add assembly="System.Net.Http, Version=4.2.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=B03F5F7F11D50A3A" />-->
        <add assembly="System.ComponentModel.Composition, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=B77A5C561934E089" />
      </assemblies>
    </compilation>
    <customErrors mode="Off" />
    <httpRuntime targetFramework="4.7.2" />
  </system.web>
  • 1
    This works in Visual Studio 2017 (15.9.4) and allows you to build with the System.Net.Http (4.3.4) NuGet package instead of a direct reference to the DLL that ships with the .NET 4.7.2 framework release. To use the shipped reference (with no other dependencies introduced) within the IDE do this: 1) Remove web/app.config binding redirects 2) Remove NuGet package for System.Net.Http 3) Open "Add New Reference" and directly link to the new 4.2.0.0 build that ships with .NET 4.7. – EnocNRoll - Ananda Gopal Jan 10 at 22:22
5

You can fix this by upgrading your project to .NET Framework 4.7.2. This was answered by Alex Ghiondea - MSFT. Please go upvote him as he truly deserves it!

This is documented as a known issue in .NET Framework 4.7.1.

As a workaround you can add these targets to your project. They will remove the DesignFacadesToFilter from the list of references passed to SGEN (and add them back once SGEN is done)

<Target Name="RemoveDesignTimeFacadesBeforeSGen" BeforeTargets="GenerateSerializationAssemblies">
  <ItemGroup>
    <DesignFacadesToFilter Include="System.IO.Compression.ZipFile" />
    <_FilterOutFromReferencePath Include="@(_DesignTimeFacadeAssemblies_Names->'%(OriginalIdentity)')" 
        Condition="'@(DesignFacadesToFilter)' == '@(_DesignTimeFacadeAssemblies_Names)' and '%(Identity)' != ''" /> 
    <ReferencePath Remove="@(_FilterOutFromReferencePath)" />
  </ItemGroup>
  <Message Importance="normal" Text="Removing DesignTimeFacades from ReferencePath before running SGen." /> </Target>

<Target Name="ReAddDesignTimeFacadesBeforeSGen" AfterTargets="GenerateSerializationAssemblies">
  <ItemGroup>
    <ReferencePath Include="@(_FilterOutFromReferencePath)" />
  </ItemGroup>
  <Message Importance="normal" Text="Adding back DesignTimeFacades from ReferencePath now that SGen has ran." />
</Target>

Another option (machine wide) is to add the following binding redirect to sgen.exe.config:

<runtime>
  <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
    <dependentAssembly>
      <assemblyIdentity name="System.IO.Compression.ZipFile" publicKeyToken="b77a5c561934e089" culture="neutral" />
      <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-4.2.0.0" newVersion="4.0.0.0" />
    </dependentAssembly>
  </assemblyBinding>
</runtime> This will only work on machines with .NET Framework 4.7.1. installed. Once .NET Framework 4.7.2 is installed on that machine, this workaround should be removed.
4

I have same issue and only way how i am able to fix it is add bindingRedirect to app.confing how wrote @tripletdad99.

But if you have solution with more project is really suck update every project by hand (and also sometimes after update some nuget package you need to do it again). And it is reason why i wrote simple powershell script which if all app.configs.

 param(
    [string]$SourceDirectory,
    [string]$Package,
    [string]$OldVersion,
    [string]$NewVersion
)

Write-Host "Start fixing app.config in $sourceDirectory"
Write-Host "$Package set oldVersion to $OldVersion and newVersion $NewVersion"
Write-Host "Search app.config files.."
[array]$files = get-childitem $sourceDirectory -Include app.config App.config -Recurse | select -expand FullName
foreach ($file in $files)
{
    Write-Host $file
    $xml = [xml](Get-Content $file)
    $daNodes = $xml.configuration.runtime.assemblyBinding.dependentAssembly
    foreach($node in $daNodes)
    {
        if($node.assemblyIdentity.name -eq $package)
        {
            $updateNode = $node.bindingRedirect
            $updateNode.oldVersion = $OldVersion
            $updateNode.newVersion =$NewVersion
            Write-Host "Fix"
        }
    }
    $xml.Save($file)
}

Write-Host "Done"

Example how to use:

./scripts/FixAppConfig.ps1 -SourceDirectory "C:\project-folder" -Package "System.Net.Http" -OldVersion "0.0.0.0-4.3.2.0" -NewVersion "4.0.0.0"

Probably it is not perfect and also it will be better if somebody link it to pre-build task.

2

This will work in .NET 4.7.2 with Visual Studio 2017 (15.9.4):

  • Remove web/app.config binding redirects
  • Remove NuGet package for System.Net.Http
  • Open "Add New Reference" and directly link to the new 4.2.0.0 build that ships with .NET 4.7.2

![image](https://user-images.githubusercontent.com/38843378/50998531-b5bb3a00-14f5-11e9-92df-6c590c469349.png)

1

I had this, but, it was because I had added a NuGet package that had updated the binding redirects. Once I removed the package, the redirects were still there. I removed all of them, and then ran update-package -reinstall. This added the correct redirects.

0

Check .net framework version.
My original .net framework is older version.
After I installed .net framework 4.6, this issue is automatically solved.

0

For me, I had set my project to run on the latest version of .Net Framework (a change from .Net Framework 4.6.1 to 4.7.2).

Everything worked, no errors and published without issue, and it was only by chance that I came across the System.Net.Http error message, shown in a small, hard-to-notice, but quite important API request over the website I'm working on.

I rolled back to 4.6.1 and everything is fine again.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.