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I am a beginner with C. This is a simple program that prompts for a name from keyboard input, creates a greeting using the name, then prints it. At runtime, immediately after entering the name at the console and pressing enter, a segmentation fault occurs. After debugging I suspect the fault lies at the scanf() function. I've tried tweaking the argument 'name' with '*' and '&', and initializing the char array 'name' with an empty string, but none of this helped.

// Prompt for a name and print a greeting using the name.    

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    // Prompt for a name.
    printf("What is your name? ");

    // Get the name.
    char name[20];
    scanf("%s", name);    // Suspect segfault occurs here...

    // Construct the greeting.
    char *greeting;
    char *suffix;
    greeting = "Hello, ";
    suffix = ", nice to meet you!";
    strcat(greeting, name);
    strcat(greeting, suffix);

    // Display the greeting.
    printf("%s", greeting);

    return 0;
}
  • Suspect segfault occurs here... I thought you said you'd run a debugger? That'll make it clear where the segfault is occurring, which isn't there. As mentioned, it's because you're trying to do stuff with constant data, which is UB. Anyway, there's no need to do 2 steps of char *c; c = "stuff"; when you can simply do const char c[] = "stuff"; - which makes it a lot clearer conceptually that you're dealing with read-only memory here. – underscore_d Jul 16 '16 at 12:34
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    @underscore_d: The short cut to char *c; c = "stuff"; would be char * c = "stuff";. What you propose changes the situation significantly. – alk Jul 16 '16 at 12:39
  • @alk Sure, that's more literal. Apologies if I've forgotten something basic due to C++ being more my thing - what's the significant change? Bearing in mind C's eager conversion of array names into pointers to their first elements, the name c would have the same semantics in most cases. But if anything, it seems even better as then you can use it to get the sizeof the string (including the null terminator). – underscore_d Jul 16 '16 at 12:45
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    @underscore_d: Oh well yes, fair enough, I overlooked the const. However that's not much of a problem in C, as opposed to C++. Still pointers are not arrays. – alk Jul 16 '16 at 12:50
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    Ok, ok, my comment "However that's not much of a problem in C" is BS, as writing to a const variable provokes UB. – alk Jul 16 '16 at 13:03
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The two calls to strcat()

char *greeting;
char *suffix;
greeting = "Hello, ";
suffix = ", nice to meet you!";
strcat(greeting, name);
strcat(greeting, suffix);

provoke undefined behaviour by trying to append to storage belonging to a "string"-literal ("Hello, ").

A "string"-literal's storage is

  1. constant
  2. and even if it weren't, it does not provide any additional room for anything to be appended.

To fix this provide a buffer sufficiently large and copy in there everything that is needed:

char *greeting;
char *suffix;
greeting = "Hello, ";
suffix = ", nice to meet you!";
char buffer[7 + 20 + 19 + 1]; /* 7 for "Hello, ", 
                                20 for name (which in fact for your code needed to be 19 only),
                                19 for ", nice to meet you!" and
                                 1 for the 0-terminator. */
strcpy(buffer, greeting); /* Use strcpy() to copy to an uninitialised buffer. */ 
strcat(buffer, name);
strcat(buffer, suffix);

Also to make sure the user does not overflow the memory provided for name tell scanf() how much is available;

  char name[20 + 1]; /* If you need 20 characters, define 1 more to hold the
                        "string"'s 0-terminator. */

  scanf("%20s", name); /* Tell scanf() to read in a maximum of 20 chars. */
1

The problem is with

strcat(greeting, name);

greeting points to read-only memory. Appending name to greeting attempts altering contents in it. The result is segfault.

1
   strcat(greeting, name);

This call to strcat is modifying a string constant - that's not legal, and that's what's causing your segfault (techincally, what you're seeing is the result of undefined behaviour).

For completeness:

scanf("%s", name);

If the buffer is limited to a size of 20, then you should use:

scanf("%19s", name);

... to limit the number of characters actually stored (though there are better ways to read a variable-length line). I used 19 because there needs to be space for the nul terminator character.

Then, allocate a suitable storage for your complete string:

char full_greeting[20 + 7 + 19] = ""; // name + "hello"... + "nice to meet"...

And copy into that:

strcpy(full_greeting, greeting);
strcat(full_greeting, name);
strcat(full_greeting, suffix);

printf("%s", full_greeting);

Dynamic string solution (POSIX)

On a POSIX system, you can have scanf allocate a buffer for the name it reads:

char *name = NULL;
scanf("%ms", &name); // you could also use 'getline' function
if (name == NULL) {
    exit(1); // scanf failed or memory allocation failed
}

(Note that using getline would read an entire line, which is not the same as the current scanf, which reads a string up to the first whitespace).

Then, you calculate the length of your buffer dynamically:

int req_len = strlen(name) + strlen(greeting) + strlen(suffix) + 1;
// (+1 is for nul terminator)
char * buffer = malloc(req_len);
if (buffer == NULL) {
    exit(1); // or handle the error somehow
}
strcpy(buffer, greeting);
strcat(buffer, name);
strcat(buffer, suffix);

printf("%s", buffer);
free(buffer);
free(name);
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    The 20s should be 19s - Need space for the null character – Ed Heal Jul 16 '16 at 12:14
  • @EdHeal yep, fixed. Thanks. – davmac Jul 16 '16 at 12:18
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char *greeting;
char *suffix;
greeting = "Hello, ";
suffix = ", nice to meet you!";
strcat(greeting, name);
strcat(greeting, suffix);

You are making an strcat when the destination is not only non-modifiable, but also too small. You may know that writing

char *p = "hello";
*p = 'x';

is undefined behavior. This is what strcat is doing to the greeting argument that you pass in. The solution is

#define MAXBUF 64

char *mystrcat(char *dest, char *src)
{
    while (*dest) 
        dest++;
    while (*dest++ = *src++)
        ;

    return --dest;
}

char greeting[MAXBUF], *p;

strcpy(greeting, "hello, ");
p = mystrcat(greeting, name);
mystrcat(p, ", nice to meet you");

Also, notice the new function mystrcat. This is an optimization that is explained in Joel Spolsky's famous post.

  • "char *p = "hello"; *p = 'x'; is undefined behavior. This is what strcat is doing to the greeting argument ..." not exactly. Or what does the "This" refer to? – alk Jul 16 '16 at 12:43
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    Underneath, it is modifying the string. Of course, it's not just replacing the first character with an x. @alk "This" refers to the same type of action – Edward Karak Jul 16 '16 at 12:44
  • Detail "destination is not only non-modifiable ...". The destination greeting may be modifiable. It might not. Attempting to modify is UB. – chux Jul 16 '16 at 17:40
  • @chux That seems to confuse the 2 possible definitions of modifiable: whether the object was declared const vs whether the OS has put it in a read-only page of memory. Clearly, we can't depend on the latter, and doing so would be UB, so the only metric that matters is the former; in that sense, saying it's non-modifiable is accurate, if not totally precise. – underscore_d Jul 17 '16 at 8:54

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