Can I launch tests for my reusable Django app without incorporating this app into a project?

My app uses some models, so it is necessary to provide (TEST_)DATABASE_* settings. Where should I store them and how should I launch tests?

For a Django project, I can run tests with manage.py test; when I use django-admin.py test with my standalone app, I get:

Error: Settings cannot be imported, because environment variable DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE is undefined.

What are the best practises here?

  • Django doesn't require a project. What are you asking? Did you run the the django-admin.py test? What did you observe? – S.Lott Oct 1 '10 at 17:49
  • for django project I run tests by: manage.py test, when I use django-admin.py I get: Error: Settings cannot be imported, because environment variable DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE is undefined. I believe this have to be very simple but I stucked with this. – dzida Oct 1 '10 at 17:51

The correct usage of Django (>= 1.4) test runner is as follows:

import django, sys
from django.conf import settings

settings.configure(DEBUG=True,
               DATABASES={
                    'default': {
                        'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3',
                    }
                },
               ROOT_URLCONF='myapp.urls',
               INSTALLED_APPS=('django.contrib.auth',
                              'django.contrib.contenttypes',
                              'django.contrib.sessions',
                              'django.contrib.admin',
                              'myapp',))

try:
    # Django <= 1.8
    from django.test.simple import DjangoTestSuiteRunner
    test_runner = DjangoTestSuiteRunner(verbosity=1)
except ImportError:
    # Django >= 1.8
    django.setup()
    from django.test.runner import DiscoverRunner
    test_runner = DiscoverRunner(verbosity=1)

failures = test_runner.run_tests(['myapp'])
if failures:
    sys.exit(failures)

DjangoTestSuiteRunner and DiscoverRunner have mostly compatible interfaces.

For more information you should consult the "Defining a Test Runner" docs:

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I've ended with such solution (it was inspired by solution found in django-voting):

Create file eg. 'runtests.py' in tests dir containing:

import os, sys
from django.conf import settings

DIRNAME = os.path.dirname(__file__)
settings.configure(DEBUG = True,
                   DATABASE_ENGINE = 'sqlite3',
                   DATABASE_NAME = os.path.join(DIRNAME, 'database.db'),
                   INSTALLED_APPS = ('django.contrib.auth',
                                     'django.contrib.contenttypes',
                                     'django.contrib.sessions',
                                     'django.contrib.admin',
                                     'myapp',
                                     'myapp.tests',))


from django.test.simple import run_tests

failures = run_tests(['myapp',], verbosity=1)
if failures:
    sys.exit(failures)

It allows to run tests by python runtests.py command. It doesn't require installed dependencies (eg. buildout) and it doesn't harm tests run when app is incorporated into bigger project.

For Django 1.7 it's slightly different. Assuming you have the following directory structure for app foo:

foo
|── docs
|── foo
│   ├── __init__.py
│   ├── models.py
│   ├── urls.py
│   └── views.py
└── tests
    ├── foo_models
    │   ├── __init__.py
    │   ├── ...
    │   └── tests.py
    ├── foo_views 
    │   ├── __init__.py
    │   ├── ...
    │   └── tests.py
    ├── runtests.py
    └── urls.py

This is how the Django project itself structures its tests.

You want to run all tests in foo/tests/ with the command:

python3 runtests.py

You also want to be able to run the command from a parent directory of tests, e.g. by Tox or Invoke, just like python3 foo/tests/runtests.py.

The solution I present here is quite reusable, only the app's name foo must be adjusted (and additional apps, if necessary). They can not be installed via modify_settings, because it would miss the database setup.

The following files are needed:

urls.py

"""
This urlconf exists because Django expects ROOT_URLCONF to exist. URLs
should be added within the test folders, and use TestCase.urls to set them.
This helps the tests remain isolated.
"""

urlpatterns = []

runtests.py

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import glob
import os
import sys

import django
from django.conf import settings
from django.core.management import execute_from_command_line


BASE_DIR = os.path.abspath(os.path.dirname(__file__))
sys.path.append(os.path.abspath(os.path.join(BASE_DIR, '..')))

# Unfortunately, apps can not be installed via ``modify_settings``
# decorator, because it would miss the database setup.
CUSTOM_INSTALLED_APPS = (
    'foo',
    'django.contrib.admin',
)

ALWAYS_INSTALLED_APPS = (
    'django.contrib.auth',
    'django.contrib.contenttypes',
    'django.contrib.sessions',
    'django.contrib.messages',
    'django.contrib.staticfiles',
)

ALWAYS_MIDDLEWARE_CLASSES = (
    'django.contrib.sessions.middleware.SessionMiddleware',
    'django.middleware.common.CommonMiddleware',
    'django.middleware.csrf.CsrfViewMiddleware',
    'django.contrib.auth.middleware.AuthenticationMiddleware',
    'django.contrib.messages.middleware.MessageMiddleware',
    'django.middleware.clickjacking.XFrameOptionsMiddleware',
)


settings.configure(
    SECRET_KEY="django_tests_secret_key",
    DEBUG=False,
    TEMPLATE_DEBUG=False,
    ALLOWED_HOSTS=[],
    INSTALLED_APPS=ALWAYS_INSTALLED_APPS + CUSTOM_INSTALLED_APPS,
    MIDDLEWARE_CLASSES=ALWAYS_MIDDLEWARE_CLASSES,
    ROOT_URLCONF='tests.urls',
    DATABASES={
        'default': {
            'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3',
        }
    },
    LANGUAGE_CODE='en-us',
    TIME_ZONE='UTC',
    USE_I18N=True,
    USE_L10N=True,
    USE_TZ=True,
    STATIC_URL='/static/',
    # Use a fast hasher to speed up tests.
    PASSWORD_HASHERS=(
        'django.contrib.auth.hashers.MD5PasswordHasher',
    ),
    FIXTURE_DIRS=glob.glob(BASE_DIR + '/' + '*/fixtures/')

)

django.setup()
args = [sys.argv[0], 'test']
# Current module (``tests``) and its submodules.
test_cases = '.'

# Allow accessing test options from the command line.
offset = 1
try:
    sys.argv[1]
except IndexError:
    pass
else:
    option = sys.argv[1].startswith('-')
    if not option:
        test_cases = sys.argv[1]
        offset = 2

args.append(test_cases)
# ``verbosity`` can be overwritten from command line.
args.append('--verbosity=2')
args.extend(sys.argv[offset:])

execute_from_command_line(args)

Some of the settings are optional; they improve speed or a more realistic environment.

The second argument points to the current directory. It makes use of the feature of providing a path to a directory to discover tests below that directory.

  • Great answer! I added an __init__.py to /tests/ to make it work. – Mikke Feb 25 '16 at 13:28
  • For the most part, I was able to avoid setting up sub directories for my apps in the tests directory, by just setting test_cases = '..' instead (to allow me to follow the convention of having tests.py in the app folders). Very nice answer! – Sayse Feb 7 '17 at 15:53

For my reusable app(django-moderation) I use buildout. I create example_project, i use it with buildout to run tests on it. I simply put my app inside of settings of example_project.

When i want to install all dependencies used by my project and run tests, i only need to do following:

  • Run: python bootstrap.py
  • Run buildout:

    bin/buildout

  • Run tests for Django 1.1 and Django 1.2:

    bin/test-1.1 bin/test-1.2

Here you can find tutorial how to configure reusable app to use buildout for deployment and tests run: http://jacobian.org/writing/django-apps-with-buildout/

Here you will find example buildout config which i use in my project:

http://github.com/dominno/django-moderation/blob/master//buildout.cfg

  • Thanks for useful info. Will see if this solves my problem (looks like a lot of hassle at a first glance) but might be interesting for other purposes. – dzida Oct 1 '10 at 21:27

In a pure pytest context, to provide just enough Django environment to get tests running for my reusable app without an actual Django project, I needed the following pieces:

pytest.ini:

[pytest]
DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE = test_settings
python_files = tests.py test_*.py *_tests.py

test_settings.py:

# You may need more or less than what's shown here - this is a skeleton:

DATABASES = {
    'default': {
        'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3',
    }
}

INSTALLED_APPS = (
    'django.contrib.admin',
    'django.contrib.auth',
    'django.contrib.contenttypes',
    'django.contrib.messages',
    'django.contrib.sessions',
    'django.contrib.sites',
    'django.contrib.staticfiles',
    'todo',
)

ROOT_URLCONF = 'base_urls'

TEMPLATES = [
    {
        'DIRS': ['path/to/your/templates'), ],
    }
]

MIDDLEWARE = [
    'django.middleware.security.SecurityMiddleware',
    'django.contrib.sessions.middleware.SessionMiddleware',
    'django.middleware.common.CommonMiddleware',
    'django.middleware.csrf.CsrfViewMiddleware',
    'django.contrib.auth.middleware.AuthenticationMiddleware',
    'django.contrib.messages.middleware.MessageMiddleware',
    'django.middleware.clickjacking.XFrameOptionsMiddleware',
]

base_urls.py:

"""
This urlconf exists so we can run tests without an actual
Django project (Django expects ROOT_URLCONF to exist.)
It is not used by installed instances of this app.
"""

from django.urls import include, path

urlpatterns = [
    path('foo/', include('myapp.urls')),
]

templates/base.html:

If any of your tests hit actual views, your app's templates will probably be extending the project base.html, so that file must exist. In my case, I just created an empty file templates/base.html.

I can now run pytest -x -v from my standalone reusable app directory, without a Django project.

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