I'm using NixOS with XMonad as a window manager, which was enabled via the configurations.nix. This works fine.

After booting, the initial login is done via the NixOS login gui.

On a Debian system for instance systemd can be configured to boot only to the terminal and not directly to a desktop environment. One can setup an .xinit file then to start the chosen window manager or desktop environment without using any display manager (like lightdm, kdm...). It's started then by calling startx.

  1. How would described effect be done in Nix? I guess there's an declarative way to do so.
  2. Another question, partly related to this, is: After changing xserver settings in the configurations.nix (e.g. in services.xserver.synaptics) and rebuilding via nixos-rebuild switch/test, what do I have to do in order to take them in effect?
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    Voting to migrate this to Super User. You'll probably be better off there. :) – Siguza Jul 17 '16 at 11:16

Those are 2 separate questions, thus I believe you'd be much better splitting them into 2 StackOverflow questions (it's much harder now to answer e.g. only one of them). That said:

  1. AFAIK, people building the NixOS are not aware of a way to do this in systemd. If you know of such method, I believe there might be interested to learn about it!

  2. I suppose you want:

    $ systemctl start display-manager.service   # CAUTION: see NOTE below!!!
    

    NOTE: this will kill any open X session! (I guess that this might be the reason why it's not done automatically on nixos-rebuild switch...)

    By the way, you may have noticed that after nixos-rebuild switch, a message is shown, something like: "display-manager.service is not restarted". That's what led me to find the answer to this question when I needed it myself.

  • systemctl start display-manager.service → The point of the question is to get the display manager out of the way. That’s what startx is for: a way to launch X on the current console, using the current login session. – phg Feb 9 '17 at 11:34

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