36

I have a table called PX_Child that has a foreign key on PX_Parent. I'd like to temporarily disable this FK constraint so that I can truncate PX_Parent. I'm not sure how this goes however.

I've tried these commands

ALTER TABLE PX_Child NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

ALTER TABLE PX_Parent NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

(truncate commands)

ALTER TABLE PX_Child CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

ALTER TABLE PX_Parent CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

But the truncate still tells me it can't truncate PX_Parent because of a foreign key constraint. I've looked all around the net and can't seem to find what I'm doing wrong, sorry for the basic nature of this question.

1
  • 1
    Looks like Kalen Delaney was inadvertently responsible for starting this idea off. Here she clarifies "you have to drop the referencing constraint in order to truncate the table." Oct 2, 2010 at 0:37

4 Answers 4

49

You can't truncate the table if there is any foreign key referencing it, including disabled constraints. You either need to drop the foreign key constraints or use the DELETE command.

2
  • 1
    See my (5 years later) answer below for how to quickly generate the DROP CONSTRAINT and ADD CONSTRAINT SQL
    – RJB
    Apr 24, 2016 at 0:53
  • The DELETE statement conflicted with the REFERENCE constraint. (Delete is not working either)
    – Enrico
    Dec 17, 2019 at 11:05
22

There is an easier-ish way. I was faced with the same problem and found this solution: https://www.mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/3347/drop-and-recreate-all-foreign-key-constraints-in-sql-server/

If you just run this query in your DB, it will generate the T-SQL you need to include before/after your sproc, in order to delete and then restore any foreign key constraints.

Don't worry about trying to understand this query itself.

CREATE TABLE #x -- feel free to use a permanent table
(
  drop_script NVARCHAR(MAX),
  create_script NVARCHAR(MAX)
);

DECLARE @drop   NVARCHAR(MAX) = N'',
        @create NVARCHAR(MAX) = N'';

-- drop is easy, just build a simple concatenated list from sys.foreign_keys:
SELECT @drop += N'
ALTER TABLE ' + QUOTENAME(cs.name) + '.' + QUOTENAME(ct.name) 
    + ' DROP CONSTRAINT ' + QUOTENAME(fk.name) + ';'
FROM sys.foreign_keys AS fk
INNER JOIN sys.tables AS ct
  ON fk.parent_object_id = ct.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS cs 
  ON ct.[schema_id] = cs.[schema_id];

INSERT #x(drop_script) SELECT @drop;

-- create is a little more complex. We need to generate the list of 
-- columns on both sides of the constraint, even though in most cases
-- there is only one column.
SELECT @create += N'
ALTER TABLE ' 
   + QUOTENAME(cs.name) + '.' + QUOTENAME(ct.name) 
   + ' ADD CONSTRAINT ' + QUOTENAME(fk.name) 
   + ' FOREIGN KEY (' + STUFF((SELECT ',' + QUOTENAME(c.name)
   -- get all the columns in the constraint table
    FROM sys.columns AS c 
    INNER JOIN sys.foreign_key_columns AS fkc 
    ON fkc.parent_column_id = c.column_id
    AND fkc.parent_object_id = c.[object_id]
    WHERE fkc.constraint_object_id = fk.[object_id]
    ORDER BY fkc.constraint_column_id 
    FOR XML PATH(N''), TYPE).value(N'.[1]', N'nvarchar(max)'), 1, 1, N'')
  + ') REFERENCES ' + QUOTENAME(rs.name) + '.' + QUOTENAME(rt.name)
  + '(' + STUFF((SELECT ',' + QUOTENAME(c.name)
   -- get all the referenced columns
    FROM sys.columns AS c 
    INNER JOIN sys.foreign_key_columns AS fkc 
    ON fkc.referenced_column_id = c.column_id
    AND fkc.referenced_object_id = c.[object_id]
    WHERE fkc.constraint_object_id = fk.[object_id]
    ORDER BY fkc.constraint_column_id 
    FOR XML PATH(N''), TYPE).value(N'.[1]', N'nvarchar(max)'), 1, 1, N'') + ');'
FROM sys.foreign_keys AS fk
INNER JOIN sys.tables AS rt -- referenced table
  ON fk.referenced_object_id = rt.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS rs 
  ON rt.[schema_id] = rs.[schema_id]
INNER JOIN sys.tables AS ct -- constraint table
  ON fk.parent_object_id = ct.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS cs 
  ON ct.[schema_id] = cs.[schema_id]
WHERE rt.is_ms_shipped = 0 AND ct.is_ms_shipped = 0;

UPDATE #x SET create_script = @create;

PRINT @drop;
PRINT @create;

/*
EXEC sp_executesql @drop
-- clear out data etc. here
EXEC sp_executesql @create;
*/

Generates a bunch of:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Whatever] DROP CONSTRAINT....
--
ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Whatever] ADD CONSTRAINT....
10
  • 25
    bad advice: "Don't worry about trying to understand this query itself". Never run anything gotten off the net without understanding it May 22, 2016 at 20:39
  • 5
    There is a difference between understanding how a query works and making sure it won't do any harm. The latter is almost always easier. Jul 9, 2016 at 9:15
  • 3
    The fact that this mess of dynamic sql is necessary to simply execute a TRUNCATE TABLE is revolting.
    – Pxtl
    May 18, 2017 at 19:46
  • 3
    As written this doesn't properly recreate constraints with 'ON DELETE CASCADE` rules. It's a simple fix, change the line FOR XML PATH(N''), TYPE).value(N'.[1]', N'nvarchar(max)'), 1, 1, N'') + ');' to FOR XML PATH(N''), TYPE).value(N'.[1]', N'nvarchar(max)'), 1, 1, N'') + ') ON DELETE ' + REPLACE(fk.delete_referential_action_desc, '_', ' ') + ';' Sep 14, 2017 at 4:03
  • 2
    Note that the PRINT @drop and PRINT @create statements will truncate in SQL Management Studio. If you want these full values you will need to SELECT * FROM #x and then copy values from the two resulting columns. Even then I ended up having to DECLARE @tempCreate NVARCHAR(MAX); SELECT @tempCreate = create_script from #x; EXEC sp_executesql @tempCreate; for my create statement. Mar 16, 2018 at 0:08
6

SQL server will not let you truncate the table while the constraint exists, even if it's disabled. Drop the constraint and re-create it after truncating the table. Or just drop and re-create the tables, whichever is easier to do in your application.

4
  • 3
    What do you mean it's not a transactional command? You can roll it back just fine. CREATE TABLE Blah(a int); INSERT Blah VALUES(1); SELECT * FROM Blah; BEGIN TRAN; TRUNCATE TABLE Blah; SELECT * FROM Blah; ROLLBACK TRAN SELECT * FROM Blah; DROP TABLE Blah. Truncate works by deallocating entire pages rather than removing rows, but it's still transactional.
    – ErikE
    Oct 2, 2010 at 1:11
  • @Emtucifor: Oops, seems like I misinterpreted the documentation you you're right! I removed that piece of misinformation.
    – Paul Groke
    Oct 2, 2010 at 1:47
  • 2
    @Emtucifor, @pgroke, in a way you are both correct as the standard allows for TRUNCATE to be non-transactional, but implementations are allowed to make it transaction. Hence TRUNCATE as defined doesn't promise a rollback can be done, but SqlServer (and Postgres) adds that promise beyond the standard.
    – Jon Hanna
    Oct 2, 2010 at 10:43
  • 1
    @Jon Thanks for clarifying. Let me rephrase. In SQL Server, truncate is transactional.
    – ErikE
    Oct 2, 2010 at 21:17
2

There is no such option to truncate table while foreign key constraint but we can use some trick like

 ALTER TABLE [dbo].[table2] DROP CONSTRAINT [FK_table2_table1]
    GO
    truncate table [table1]
GO
    ALTER TABLE [dbo].[table2]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_table2_table1] FOREIGN KEY([FKId])
    REFERENCES [dbo].[table1] ([ID])
    GO

    ALTER TABLE [dbo].[table2] CHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_table2_table1]
    GO

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