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I wrote the below Rascal code that is supposed to build a tree out of a map from node names to nodes, starting at the node mapped from "top". It should repeatedly replace the children of all nodes that have strings as children in result by the nodes nodeMap maps them to, until nothing changes anymore (fixpoint).

getNode returns the node a map[str,node] maps it to, or the key itself if it is not present as a key in the map. This works fine, as proves the fact that other code at the bottom of this question does work. However, the code directly below seems to run infintely even on very small inputs.

node nodeMapToNode(map[str, node] nodeMap) {
    node result = nodeMap["top"];
    return outermost visit(result) {
        case node n: {
            if ([*str children] := getChildren(n)) {
                insert makeNode(getName(n), [getNode(child, nodeMap) | child <- children]);
            }
        }
    }
}

The following code does work and returns in an instant on small inputs as I expected. This is, however, exactly what I understood outermost-visiting should do from what I understood from the Rascal tutor.

Can anyone explain to me what the difference between these code snippets is (besides the way they are written) and what I thus misunderstood about the effect of outermost visit? Also, I'd like to know if a shorter and/or nicer way to write this code - using something like outermost-visiting instead of writing the fixpoint by hand - does exist.

node nodeMapToNode(map[str, node] nodeMap) {
    node result = nodeMap["top"];
    node lastResult;
    do {
        lastResult = result;
        result = visit(lastResult) {
            case node n: {
                if ([*str children] := getChildren(n)) {
                    insert makeNode(getName(n),
                        [getNode(child, nodeMap) | child <- children]);
                }
            }
        }
    } while (result != lastResult);
    return result;
}
  • To avoid people without too much knowledge of Rascal who may see the answer with enough information would have to look it up, here is the definition of the "outermost" visiting strategy from the Rascal tutor: "repeat a top-down traversal as long as the traversal changes the resulting value (compute a fixed-point)." – Olav Trauschke Jul 18 '16 at 21:43
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What is outermost?

The rascal tutor is very compact in it's explanation but let's start from there.

repeat a top-down traversal as long as the traversal changes the resulting value (compute a fixed-point).

which in rascal terms means that this:

r = outermost visit(x) {
  case str s => s + "."
    when size(s) < 3
};

is syntactic sugar for:

r = x;
solve(r) {
  r = top-down visit(r) {
    case str s => s + "."
      when size(s) < 3
  };
}

I think there are two common cases were outermost/innermost makes sense:

  • your replacement should be repeated multiple times on the same node
  • your replacement generate new nodes that match other patterns

Your specific example

Regarding the example in your question. The other manually rewritten outermost is actually an innermost. The default visit strategy is bottom-up.

In general, an bottom-up visit of the tree is a quicker than a top-down. Especially when you are rewriting it, since Rascal is immutable, building a new tree bottom-up is quicker.

So, perhaps replace your code with an innermost visit instead of an outermost?

  • Thanks for the explanation. I never considerd the fact Rascal is immutable here and certainly not its impact on performance of visiting in different direction. I'll try later tonight, but I'm fairly sure using the innermost strategy should solve my problem then. – Olav Trauschke Jul 19 '16 at 11:01
  • You are welcome, if you want to know more about the values of rascal, check this tutor page on values. Also, if your reference is an OO language, checkout Comparing with other paradigms: OO to quickly glance differences you might appreciate. – Davy Landman Jul 19 '16 at 20:02
  • For reference: As expected, this solution worked like a charm – Olav Trauschke Jul 19 '16 at 21:28
  • The sugar expansion in the answer is not quite right Davy. this visits the tree a lot more often than the Rascal actually does. The visit stays at the current level while a successful substitution is made and then descends into the (latest version of) the current sub-tree if it can no longer do that. – Jurgen Vinju Aug 10 '16 at 6:19

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