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How can I make Java print "Hello"?

When I type System.out.print("Hello"); the output will be Hello. What I am looking for is "Hello" with the quotes("").

10 Answers 10

136
System.out.print("\"Hello\"");

The double quote character has to be escaped with a backslash in a Java string literal. Other characters that need special treatment include:

  • Carriage return and newline: "\r" and "\n"
  • Backslash: "\\\\"
  • Single quote: "\'"
  • Horizontal tab and form feed: "\t" and "\f"

The complete list of Java string and character literal escapes may be found in the section 3.10.6 of the JLS.

It is also worth noting that you can include arbitrary Unicode characters in your source code using Unicode escape sequences of the form "\uxxxx" where the "x"s are hexadecimal digits. However, these are different from ordinary string and character escapes in that you can use them anywhere in a Java program ... not just in string and character literals; see JLS sections 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 for a details on the use of Unicode in Java source code.

See also:

| improve this answer | |
  • Is there a way without backslashes in java like triple quotes in python? – Lakindu Akash May 25 '18 at 20:06
  • 2
    No there isn't. – Stephen C May 25 '18 at 23:34
9
char ch='"';

System.out.println(ch + "String" + ch);

Or

System.out.println('"' + "ASHISH" + '"');
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7

Escape double-quotes in your string: "\"Hello\""

More on the topic (check 'Escape Sequences' part)

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4

You can do it using a unicode character also

System.out.print('\u0022' + "Hello" + '\u0022');
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  • Even if the compiler simplify this, into \"Hello\" it isn't really readable. – Colin Hebert Oct 2 '10 at 6:39
4
System.out.println("\"Hello\""); 
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3

Adding the actual quote characters is only a tiny fraction of the problem; once you have done that, you are likely to face the real problem: what happens if the string already contains quotes, or line feeds, or other unprintable characters?

The following method will take care of everything:

public static String escapeForJava( String value, boolean quote )
{
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    if( quote )
        builder.append( "\"" );
    for( char c : value.toCharArray() )
    {
        if( c == '\'' )
            builder.append( "\\'" );
        else if ( c == '\"' )
            builder.append( "\\\"" );
        else if( c == '\r' )
            builder.append( "\\r" );
        else if( c == '\n' )
            builder.append( "\\n" );
        else if( c == '\t' )
            builder.append( "\\t" );
        else if( c < 32 || c >= 127 )
            builder.append( String.format( "\\u%04x", (int)c ) );
        else
            builder.append( c );
    }
    if( quote )
        builder.append( "\"" );
    return builder.toString();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • If you do need to do this, a (usually) better alternative to this is to use an existing library method (e.g. Apache Commons) to do the escaping / de-escaping. Or make use of an API's ability to do this; e.g. JDBC PreparedStatement, the URL and URI constructors. – Stephen C May 25 '18 at 23:44
  • @StephenC yes, of course. The usefulness of this answer just lies in the complement of the "(usually)" that you mentioned. Plus the code may have some educational value. – Mike Nakis May 26 '18 at 4:04
2
System.out.println("\"Hello\"")
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1

There are two easy methods:

  1. Use backslash \ before double quotes.
  2. Use two single quotes instead of double quotes like '' instead of "

For example:

System.out.println("\"Hello\"");                       
System.out.println("''Hello''"); 
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  • 4
    Erm ... the 2nd approach is not solving the problem. It is changing the problem. Two single quotes does not mean the same thing as a double quote ... to a computer, or to a knowledgeable person. – Stephen C Nov 30 '15 at 3:30
0

Use Escape sequence.

\"Hello\"

This will print "Hello".

| improve this answer | |
  • Duplicative answer – Stephen C May 25 '18 at 23:37
0

Take note, there are a few certain things to take note when running backslashes with specific characters.

System.out.println("Hello\\\");

The output above will be:

Hello\


System.out.println(" Hello\"  ");

The output above will be:

Hello"

| improve this answer | |

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