2

I am trying to run the system commands in golang. I want the stdout to be printint directly out onto the screen. In golang I use the following now :

out, err := exec.Command(cmd).Output()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println("error occured")
        fmt.Printf("%s", err)
   }

Here I am storing the output into "out" variable and then printing that onto the screen. But I want something which prints as a normal shell command like the system() command in perl.

in perl:

system("ls -l");

We don't need to store anything here.

is there some command in golang which mimics exactly the system() cmd in perl.

5

function Command returns the Cmd struct which has Stdout field among others.
You just have to attach OS Stdout to Cmd's Stdout

Example:

cmd := exec.Command("date") // no need to call Output method here
cmd.Stdout = os.Stdout // instead use Stdout
cmd.Stderr = os.Stderr // attach Stderr as well

err := cmd.Run()
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}

Refer: Command documentation

  • 1
    since it's not being checked, I would attach os.Stderr too – JimB Jul 19 '16 at 15:59
1

I can't see any built in options for what you want - but a 7 line function would suffice, I believe:

func system(cmd string, arg ...string) {
    out, err := exec.Command(cmd, arg...).Output()
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    fmt.Println(string(out))
}

Then you can simply call it:

system("ls", "-l")

So a working full example would be:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os/exec"
)

func main() {
    system("ls", "-l")
}

func system(cmd string, arg ...string) {
    out, err := exec.Command(cmd, arg...).Output()
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    fmt.Println(string(out))
}
  • This buffers all the output until the command has finished. That works fine if the command is non-interactive and quick-running, but it's unsatisfactory for long-running programs, and it's not the same as the system command in perl. – Paul Hankin Jul 22 '16 at 0:57

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