3

I want a function that can take two arguments (string, number of letters to crop off front) and return the same string except with the letters before character x gone.

If I write

let mut example = "stringofletters";
CropLetters(example, 3);
println!("{}", example);

then the output should be:

ingofletters

Is there any way I can do this?

| |
7

Issues with your original code:

  1. Functions use snake_case, types and traits use CamelCase.
  2. "foo" is a string literal of type &str. These may not be changed. You will need something that has been heap-allocated, such as a String.
  3. The call crop_letters(stringofletters, 3) would transfer ownership of stringofletters to the method, which means you wouldn't be able to use the variable anymore. You must pass in a mutable reference (&mut).
  4. Rust strings are not ASCII, they are UTF-8. You need to figure out how many bytes each character requires. char_indices is a good tool here.
  5. You need to handle the case of when the string is shorter than 3 characters.
  6. Once you have the byte position of the new beginning of the string, you can use drain to move a chunk of bytes out of the string. We just drop these bytes and let the String move over the remaining bytes.
fn crop_letters(s: &mut String, pos: usize) {
    match s.char_indices().nth(pos) {
        Some((pos, _)) => {
            s.drain(..pos);
        }
        None => {
            s.clear();
        }
    }
}

fn main() {
    let mut example = String::from("stringofletters");
    crop_letters(&mut example, 3);
    assert_eq!("ingofletters", example);
}

See Chris Emerson's answer if you don't actually need to modify the original String.

| |
7

In many uses it would make sense to simply return a slice of the input, avoiding any copy. Converting @Shepmaster's solution to use immutable slices:

fn crop_letters(s: &str, pos: usize) -> &str {
    match s.char_indices().skip(pos).next() {
        Some((pos, _)) => &s[pos..],
        None => "",
    }
}

fn main() {
    let example = "stringofletters"; // works with a String if you take a reference
    let cropped = crop_letters(example, 3);
    println!("{}", cropped);
}

Advantages over the mutating version are:

  • No copy is needed. You can call cropped.to_string() if you want a newly allocated result; but you don't have to.
  • It works with static string slices as well as mutable String etc.

The disadvantage is that if you really do have a mutable string you want to modify, it would be slightly less efficient as you'd need to allocate a new String.

| |
0

I found this answer which I don't consider really idiomatic:

fn crop_with_allocation(string: &str, len: usize) -> String {
    string.chars().skip(len).collect()
}

fn crop_without_allocation(string: &str, len: usize) -> &str {
    // optional length check
    if string.len() < len {
        return &"";
    }
    &string[len..]
}

fn main() {
    let example = "stringofletters"; // works with a String if you take a reference
    let cropped = crop_with_allocation(example, 3);
    println!("{}", cropped);
    let cropped = crop_without_allocation(example, 3);
    println!("{}", cropped);
}
| |
  • The "problem" with this solution is that it assumes either (a) that the input string is ASCII or (b) that the user has already found the correct byte offset. For example, this will fail with the input string "åáâä". – Shepmaster Dec 31 '18 at 15:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.