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I am working with large matrices of data (Nrow x Ncol) that are too large to be stored in memory. Instead, it is standard in my field of work to save the data into a binary file. Due to the nature of the work, I only need to access 1 column of the matrix at a time. I also need to be able to modify a column and then save the updated column back into the binary file. So far I have managed to figure out how to save a matrix as a binary file and how to read 1 'column' of the matrix from the binary file into memory. However, after I edit the contents of a column I cannot figure out how to save that column back into the binary file.

As an example, suppose the data file is a 32-bit identity matrix that has been saved to disk.

Nrow = 500
Ncol = 325
data = eye(Float32,Nrow,Ncol)
stream_data = open("data","w")
write(stream_data,data[:])
close(stream_data)

Reading the entire file from disk and then reshaping back into the matrix is straightforward:

stream_data = open("data","r")
data_matrix = read(stream_data,Float32,Nrow*Ncol)
data_matrix = reshape(data_matrix,Nrow,Ncol)
close(stream_data)

As I said before, the data-matrices I am working with are too large to read into memory and as a result the code written above would normally not be possible to execute. Instead, I need to work with 1 column at a time. The following is a solution to read 1 column (e.g. the 7th column) of the matrix into memory:

icol = 7
stream_data = open("data","r")
position_data = 4*Nrow*(icol-1)
seek(stream_data,position_data)
data_col = read(stream_data,Float32,Nrow)
close(stream_data)

Note that the coefficient '4' in the 'position_data' variable is because I am working with Float32. Also, I don't fully understand what the seek command is doing here, but it seems to be giving me the correct output based on the following tests:

data == data_matrix     # true
data[:,7] == data_col   # true

For the sake of this problem, lets say I have determined that the column I loaded (i.e. the 7th column) needs to be replaced with zeros:

data_col = zeros(Float32,size(data_col))

The problem now, is to figure out how to save this column back into the binary file without affecting any of the other data. Naturally I intend to use 'write' to perform this task. However, I am not entirely sure how to proceed. I know I need to start by opening up a stream to the data; however I am not sure what 'mode' I need to use: "w", "w+", "a", or "a+"? Here is a failed attempt using "w":

icol = 7
stream_data = open("data","w")
position_data = 4*Nrow*(icol-1)
seek(stream_data,position_data)
write(stream_data,data_col)
close(stream_data)

The original binary file (before my failed attempt to edit the binary file) occupied 650000 bytes on disk. This is consistent with the fact that the matrix is size 500x325 and Float32 numbers occupy 4 bytes (i.e. 4*500*325 = 650000). However, after my attempt to edit the binary file I have observed that the binary file now occupies only 14000 bytes of space. Some quick mental math shows that 14000 bytes corresponds to 7 columns of data (4*500*7 = 14000). A quick check confirms that the binary file has replaced all of the original data with a new matrix with size 500x7, and whose elements are all zeros.

stream_data = open("data","r")
data_new_matrix = read(stream_data,Float32,Nrow*7)
data_new_matrix = reshape(data_new_matrix,Nrow,7)
sum(abs(data_new_matrix))  # 0.0f0

What do I need to do/change in order to only modify only the 7th 'column' in the binary file?

  • are these any use here? – daycaster Jul 19 '16 at 11:15
  • Perhaps change stream_data = open("data","w") to stream_data = open("data","w+") in the vector update. Note the w+. The relevant documentation is docs.julialang.org/en/release-0.4/stdlib/io-network/#Base.open – Dan Getz Jul 19 '16 at 11:37
  • SharedArrays will do everything you just specified for you. Use the constructor with filename – Felipe Lema Jul 19 '16 at 14:25
  • @DanGetz I tried this and it gives the same result as my earlier attempt with "w" – Landon Jul 19 '16 at 17:56
  • @FelipeLema can you clarify what you mean. I wasn't aware that SharedArrays can solve my problem. – Landon Jul 19 '16 at 17:59
1

Instead of

icol = 7
stream_data = open("data","w")
position_data = 4*Nrow*(icol-1)
seek(stream_data,position_data)
write(stream_data,data_col)
close(stream_data)

in the OP, write

icol = 7
stream_data = open("data","r+")
position_data = 4*Nrow*(icol-1)
seek(stream_data,position_data)
write(stream_data,data_col)
close(stream_data)

i.e. replace "w" with "r+" and everything works.

The reference to open is http://docs.julialang.org/en/release-0.4/stdlib/io-network/#Base.open and it explains the various modes. Preferably open shouldn't be used with the original somewhat confusing but definitely slower string parameter.

  • 1
    This seems to do exactly what I wanted. And just to make sure I understand what you are saying about the string parameter, are you saying it will be faster to use stream_data=open("data",true,true,false,false,false) rather than stream_data=open("data","r+") for writing the column back into the binary file? (and something similar for reading the column into memory) – Landon Jul 21 '16 at 3:31
1

You can use SharedArrays for the need you describe:

data=SharedArray("/some/absolute/path/to/a/file", Float32,(Nrow,Ncols))
# do something with data
data[:,1]=a[:,1].+1
exit()

# restart julia
data=SharedArray("/some/absolute/path/to/a/file", Float32,(Nrow,Ncols))
@show data[1,1]
# prints 1

Now, be mindful that you're supposed to handle synchronisation to read/write from/to this file (if you have async workers) and that you're not supposed to change the size of the array (unless you know what you're doing).

  • This looks like it will do the trick. When you load the data as a SharedArray does it also load the data into memory, or does it work entirely off of disk? If it does work entirely off of disk, am I correct to think that it would be fastest to extract the current column out into a new variable so that I can work on it in memory? – Landon Jul 19 '16 at 18:39
  • I couldn't find any documentation to answer your questions. On the other hand, given the philosophy behind julia, you just try it and profile/optimize later accordingly – Felipe Lema Jul 19 '16 at 19:06

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