153

I have a Person Type, and an Array of them:

class Person {
   let name:String
   let position:Int
}

let myArray: [Person] = [p1, p1, p3]

I want to map myArray to be a Dictionary of [position:name]. The classic solution is:

var myDictionary = [Int:String]()
        
for person in myArray {
    myDictionary[person.position] = person.name
}

Is there an elegant alternative in Swift via a functional programming approach using map, flatMap, or any other modern Swift style?

2
  • A little late to the game, but do you want a dictionary of [position:name] or [position:[name]]? If you have two people in the same position, your dictionary will only keep the last one encountered in your loop....I have a similar question for which I'm trying to find a solution, but I want the result to be like [1: [p1, p3], 2: [p2]] Aug 28, 2019 at 12:35
  • 5
    Their's a built in function. See here. It's basically Dictionary(uniqueKeysWithValues: array.map{ ($0.key, $0) })
    – mfaani
    Sep 23, 2019 at 19:26

10 Answers 10

248

Since Swift 4 you can do @Tj3n's approach more cleanly and efficiently using the into version of reduce It gets rid of the temporary dictionary and the return value so it is faster and easier to read.

Sample code setup:

struct Person { 
    let name: String
    let position: Int
}
let myArray = [Person(name:"h", position: 0), Person(name:"b", position:4), Person(name:"c", position:2)]

Into parameter is passed empty dictionary of result type:

let myDict = myArray.reduce(into: [Int: String]()) {
    $0[$1.position] = $1.name
}

Directly returns a dictionary of the type passed in into:

print(myDict) // [2: "c", 0: "h", 4: "b"]
2
  • 1
    I am a bit confused about why it only seems to work with the positional ($0, $1) arguments and not when I name them. Edit: nevermind, the compiler perhaps tripped up because I still tried to return the result. Apr 19, 2019 at 1:48
  • The thing that's unclear in this answer is what $0 represents: it is the inout dictionary that we are "returning" – though not really returning, as modifying it is the equivalent of returning due to it's inout-ness.
    – adamjansch
    Jul 17, 2020 at 13:02
167

Okay map is not a good example of this, because its just same as looping, you can use reduce instead, it took each of your object to combine and turn into single value:

let myDictionary = myArray.reduce([Int: String]()) { (dict, person) -> [Int: String] in
    var dict = dict
    dict[person.position] = person.name
    return dict
}

//[2: "b", 3: "c", 1: "a"]

In Swift 4 or higher please use the below answer for clearer syntax.

6
  • 12
    I like this approach but is this more efficient than simply creating a loop to load a dictionary? I worry about performance because it seems like for every item it has to create a new mutable copy of an ever larger dictionary... Dec 28, 2016 at 23:03
  • 2
    Kendall, see my answer below, it may make it faster than looping when using Swift 4. Although, I have not benchmarked it to confirm that.
    – possen
    Oct 19, 2017 at 21:51
  • 5
    Do not use this!!! As @KendallHelmstetterGelner pointed out, the problem with this approach is every iteration, it's copying the entire dictionary in its current state, so in the first loop, it's copying a one-item dictionary. The second iteration it's copying a two-item dictionary. That's a HUGE performance drain!! The better way to do it would be to write a convenience init on the dictionary that takes your array and adds all items in it. That way it's still a one-liner for the consumer, but it eliminates the entire alloc mess this has. Plus, you can pre-allocate based on the array. Sep 28, 2018 at 18:46
  • 7
    I don't think performance will be an issue. The Swift compiler will recognize that none of the old copies of the dictionary get used and probably won't even create them. Remember the first rule of optimizing your own code: "Don't do it." Another maxim of computer science is that efficient algorithms are only useful when N is large, and N is almost never large.
    – bugloaf
    Jan 23, 2019 at 21:19
  • 1
    @MarkA.Donohoe Alternatively, use reduce(into: …), which passes the dict as an inout argument, so no copy. Dec 9, 2023 at 1:56
130

Since Swift 4 you can do this very easily. There are two new initializers that build a dictionary from a sequence of tuples (pairs of key and value). If the keys are guaranteed to be unique, you can do the following:

let persons = [Person(name: "Franz", position: 1),
               Person(name: "Heinz", position: 2),
               Person(name: "Hans", position: 3)]

Dictionary(uniqueKeysWithValues: persons.map { ($0.position, $0.name) })

=> [1: "Franz", 2: "Heinz", 3: "Hans"]

This will fail with a runtime error if any key is duplicated. In that case you can use this version:

let persons = [Person(name: "Franz", position: 1),
               Person(name: "Heinz", position: 2),
               Person(name: "Hans", position: 1)]

Dictionary(persons.map { ($0.position, $0.name) }) { _, last in last }

=> [1: "Hans", 2: "Heinz"]

This behaves as your for loop. If you don't want to "overwrite" values and stick to the first mapping, you can use this:

Dictionary(persons.map { ($0.position, $0.name) }) { first, _ in first }

=> [1: "Franz", 2: "Heinz"]

Swift 4.2 adds a third initializer that groups sequence elements into a dictionary. Dictionary keys are derived by a closure. Elements with the same key are put into an array in the same order as in the sequence. This allows you to achieve similar results as above. For example:

Dictionary(grouping: persons, by: { $0.position }).mapValues { $0.last! }

=> [1: Person(name: "Hans", position: 1), 2: Person(name: "Heinz", position: 2)]

Dictionary(grouping: persons, by: { $0.position }).mapValues { $0.first! }

=> [1: Person(name: "Franz", position: 1), 2: Person(name: "Heinz", position: 2)]

5
  • 3
    In a fact according to docs 'grouping' initializer creates dictionary with array as value (that's 'grouping' means, right?), and in the case above it will be more like [1: [Person(name: "Franz", position: 1)], 2: [Person(name: "Heinz", position: 2)], 3: [Person(name: "Hans", position: 3)]]. Not the expected result, but it can be farther mapped to flat dictionary if you wish.
    – Varrry
    Jul 19, 2018 at 8:51
  • Eureka! This is the droid I've been looking for! This is perfect and greatly simplify things in my code. Aug 29, 2019 at 7:19
  • Dead links to the initializers. Can you please update to use permalink? Dec 16, 2019 at 17:28
  • @MarqueIV I fixed the broken links. Not sure what you are referring to with permalink in this context? Dec 17, 2019 at 14:12
  • Permalinks are links websites use that will never change. So for instance, instead of something like 'www.SomeSite.com/events/today/item1.htm' which may change day to day, most sites will set up a second 'permalink' like 'www.SomeSite.com?eventid=12345' which will never change, and thus, it's safe to use in links. Not every one does it, but most pages from the big sites will offer one. Dec 17, 2019 at 23:50
13

How about a KeyPath based solution?

extension Array {
  func dictionary<Key, Value>(withKey key: KeyPath<Element, Key>, value: KeyPath<Element, Value>) -> [Key: Value] {
    reduce(into: [:]) { dictionary, element in
      let key = element[keyPath: key]
      let value = element[keyPath: value]
      dictionary[key] = value
    }
  }
}

This is how you use it:

struct HTTPHeader {
  let field: String, value: String
}

let headers = [
  HTTPHeader(field: "Accept", value: "application/json"),
  HTTPHeader(field: "User-Agent", value: "Safari")
]

headers.dictionary(withKey: \.field, value: \.value) // ["Accept": "application/json", "User-Agent": "Safari"]
9

You may write custom initializer for Dictionary type, for example from tuples:

extension Dictionary {
    public init(keyValuePairs: [(Key, Value)]) {
        self.init()
        for pair in keyValuePairs {
            self[pair.0] = pair.1
        }
    }
}

and then use map for your array of Person:

var myDictionary = Dictionary(keyValuePairs: myArray.map{($0.position, $0.name)})
3

This is what I have been using

struct Person {
    let name:String
    let position:Int
}
let persons = [Person(name: "Franz", position: 1),
               Person(name: "Heinz", position: 2),
               Person(name: "Hans", position: 3)]

var peopleByPosition = [Int: Person]()
persons.forEach{peopleByPosition[$0.position] = $0}

Would be nice if there was a way to combine the last 2 lines so that peopleByPosition could be a let.

We could make an extension to Array that does that!

extension Array {
    func mapToDict<T>(by block: (Element) -> T ) -> [T: Element] where T: Hashable {
        var map = [T: Element]()
        self.forEach{ map[block($0)] = $0 }
        return map
    }
}

Then we can just do

let peopleByPosition = persons.mapToDict(by: {$0.position})
2

You can use a reduce function. First I've created a designated initializer for Person class

class Person {
  var name:String
  var position:Int

  init(_ n: String,_ p: Int) {
    name = n
    position = p
  }
}

Later, I've initialized an Array of values

let myArray = [Person("Bill",1), 
               Person("Steve", 2), 
               Person("Woz", 3)]

And finally, the dictionary variable has the result:

let dictionary = myArray.reduce([Int: Person]()){
  (total, person) in
  var totalMutable = total
  totalMutable.updateValue(person, forKey: total.count)
  return totalMutable
}
2

Maybe something like this?

myArray.forEach({ myDictionary[$0.position] = $0.name })
2
extension Array {

    func toDictionary() -> [Int: Element] {
        self.enumerated().reduce(into: [Int: Element]()) { $0[$1.offset] = $1.element }
    }
    
}
1
extension Array {
    func mapToDict<T>(by block: (Element) -> T ) -> [T: Element] where T: Hashable {
        var map = [T: Element]()
        self.forEach{ map[block($0)] = $0 }
        return map
    }
}

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