25

I have about 1000 classes in which i need to count the number of properties of. I have the following code:

    public static int NumberOfProperties()
    {
        Type type = typeof(C507);
        return type.GetProperties().Count();
    }

I could copy and paste this in to each class changing the typeof parameter but this seems a bit tedious.

Is there anyway to make an extensions method to do this by just doing var nop = C507.NumberOfProperties();?

3
  • 22
    This seems quite likely to be an XY problem.
    – OldFart
    Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 15:32
  • 8
    What is the actual problem you're trying to solve? It's quite likely this is the not the best solution. Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 18:02
  • I very much hope you do not have 1000 classes named C000 to C999!
    – Kroltan
    Commented Jul 20, 2016 at 13:31

8 Answers 8

43

Just to add to the answers suggesting an extension for object for completeness: you can also consider implementing an extension only for Type:

public static int GetPropertyCount(this Type t)
{
    return t.GetProperties().Length;
}

and use it like this:

typeof(C507).GetPropertyCount();

The advantage is that you can get the number of properties directly from the type and do not have to create an instance first.

6
  • But it doesn't solve the problem of I could copy and paste this in to each class changing the typeof parameter but this seems a bit tedious. @EhsanSajjad Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 13:35
  • 2
    @CallumLinington this is an extension method, no need to copy it to all classes. You only have to implement it once. In the accepted answer, you have to call it for every type, too. typeof(C507).GetPropertyCount() does not seem more verbose to me than NumberOfProperties<C507>(). You have to change C507 for all types in both cases.
    – René Vogt
    Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 13:38
  • Yes but you implement it once and have to call it on 1000 classes. So you're just shorting the GetProperties().Count() but still retaining the initial problem. The problem of calling this on 1000 classes. Maybe the OP could shed more light... Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 13:41
  • 1
    @CallumLinington Yes, but the accepted answer has the same problem. But I think OP's question was about not having to write 1000 methods. That he has to call it 1000 times comes naturally from the requirement to get 1000 results for 1000 types. So your answer is indeed making a good suggestion, depending on in which format OP needs the results. Thatswhy I upvoted it.
    – René Vogt
    Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 13:44
  • 4
    ofcourse you would need to call it 1000 times, if there are thousand classes Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 13:54
30

So you can write an extension method that uses object or one that uses type.

public static class ObjectExtensions
{
    public static int GetNumberOfProperties(this object value)
    {
        return value.GetType().GetProperties().Count();
    }

    public static int GetNumberOfProperties(this Type value)
    {
        return value.GetProperties().Count();
    }
}

Usage:

new C507().GetNumberOfProperties();
typeof(C507).GetNumberOfProperties();

However, you explicitly state two things:

I could copy and paste this in to each class changing the typeof

I have about 1000 classes

You'll likely not want to instantiate a 1000 classes or copy and paste typeof() 1000 times

In this case, you will want to read them all from the Assembly.

So something like:

typeof(SomeClass).Assembly.GetTypes().Select(x => new
  {
       x.Name, 
       PropertyCount = x.GetType().GetProperties().Count()
  });

Where SomeClass is a class (doesn't matter which) where all the classes reside.

I just simply select them out into an anonymous object which contains the Types name and property count.

This:

typeof(SomeClass).Assembly

Is just a convience way to get the assembly. There are other ways.

Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(Program)).GetTypes()
Assembly.GetCallingAssembly().GetTypes()
Assembly.Load("Some Assemble Ref").GetTypes()

You can do allsorts with the types that you find. If you select out the Type itself, you can instantiate it later using Activator.CreateInstance (if it has parameterless constuctor). You can also auto fill the properties with reflection as well.

4
  • If they do not want the number of properties for every class in the assembly, they could also write a PropertyCountNeeded attribute, apply it to the classes of interest, then filter on classes with this property.
    – Mr.Mindor
    Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 14:08
  • 1
    Yeah absolutey! Or better yet define a class name convention. It depends. I would personally want to keep those 1000 classes in a single assembly. But unfortunately there is so much taken out of context its hard to derive the best possible solution. Things like, why would you have 1000 classes to begin with? Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 14:14
  • If the OP's example is taken literally, it seems they already have a naming convention: C###.
    – Mr.Mindor
    Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 14:30
  • Yeah, those were my exact thoughts. However, you just can't say without his clarification, it could just be a minimum verifiable solution Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 14:52
21

It is impossible to have a static extension method as you imagine it. That being said, it would be possible to create a generic method in a helper class as follows.

public static int NumberOfProperties<T>()
{
    Type type = typeof(T);
    return type.GetProperties().Count();
}

Given a type SomeType it could be called as int n = NumberOfProperties<SomeType>().

3
  • 2
    I'm a bit confused by It is impossible to have a static extension method as you imagine it.? The other answers seem to suggest that this is perfectly possible. Am I misunderstanding?
    – Liam
    Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 9:56
  • 3
    @Liam: While an extension methon on object is perfectly possible, as the other answers suggest, it is impossible to have it static so that a call like SomeType.NumberOfProperties() would be possible. For this, the classes would have to derive from the same base type in which the reflection logic is implemented.
    – Codor
    Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 9:57
  • 1
    @Codor: May I suggest you add your explanation of impossibility to your answer.
    – PJTraill
    Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 21:12
9

You could make an extension method on object like this:

public static int PropertyCount(this object thing)
{
    return thing.GetType().GetProperties().Count();
}

And use it on any object you like:

var x = "some string";
var numProps = x.PropertyCount();
6

If you want to have an extension method on object:

public static ObjectExtensions
{
    public static int NumberOfProperties(this object value)
    {
        if (null == value)
          throw new ArgumentNullException("value"); // or return 0

        // Length: no need in Linq here
        return value.GetType().GetProperties().Length;
    }
}

...

C507 myObj = new C507();

// How many properties does myObj instance have?
int propCount = myObj.NumberOfProperties(); 

If you want to have an extesnion method on Type:

   public static TypeExtensions
    {
        public static int NumberOfProperties(this Type value)
        {
            if (null == value)
              throw new ArgumentNullException("value"); // or return 0

            // Length: no need in Linq here
            return value.GetProperties().Length;
        }
    }

    ...


    // How many properties does C507 type have?
    int propCount = typeof(C507).NumberOfProperties(); 
1

There are a couple of ways to do this that are variations of the same thing.

You can pass the Type as an argument to a method:

public static class Helper {
    public static int NumberOfProperties(Type type)
    {
        return type.GetProperties().Count();
    }
}

Which you would call like this:

// Imagine you have a class called MyClass
var result = Helper.NumberOfProperties(typeof(MyClass));

You use use the generic system in C# to make the syntax a little cleaner. That would look like this:

public static class Helper {
    // Notice the argument was removed and 
    // the use of the "generic" syntax <T>
    public static int NumberOfProperties<T>()
    {
        var type = typeof(T);
        return type.GetProperties().Count();
    }
}

And you would call it like this:

var result = Helper.NumberOfProperties<MyClass>();

You could also use "Extensions" which allow you to call it as if it was a method that belonged to your classes.

public static class Helper {
    // notice the `this` keyword before the parameter 
    // this is what tells C# that this is an extension method
    public static int NumberOfProperties<T>(this T @this)
    {
        var type = typeof(T);
        return type.GetProperties().Count();
    }
}

This will allow you to call the method like this:

 var instance = new MyClass();
 var result = instance.NumberOfProperties();

In this example I used the generic syntax so that it applies to any type of object. If you wanted to limit it to only objects that inherit from a specific interface or base class you would just change it from using the generic syntax to using the base class/interface. Like this:

public static class Helper {
    // notice the type got changed from a generic <T>
    // to specifying the exact class you want to "extend"
    public static int NumberOfProperties(this MyBaseClass @this)
    {
        var type = typeof(T);
        return type.GetProperties().Count();
    }
}

As @rené-vogt mentioned you can also create the extension method so that it extends the type Type instead. See his answer in this thread: https://stackoverflow.com/a/38455233/984780

0

You can make a generic extension method which can apply to all types:

public static int PropertyCount<T>(this T obj)
{
    return typeof(T).GetProperties().Length;
}

This will apply to all types including value types (I.E. structs) which applying to object will not. Thanks to piedar for pointing out my mistake here, applying to object does still add this extension method to value types.

1
  • 1
    ValueType already derives from Object. All structs are objects.
    – piedar
    Commented Jul 19, 2016 at 19:23
0

If your classed can implement an interface, then you can extend that interface.

public interface IExtensible {
}

class C507 : IExtensible {

}

public static int NumberOfProperties(this IExtensible extensible)
{
    Type type = extensible.GetType();
    return type.GetProperties().Count();
}

That being said, having hundreds of (generated?) classes looks like a bad solution to begin with.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.