6

C# 6.0 in a Nutshell by Joseph Albahari and Ben Albahari (O’Reilly).

Copyright 2016 Joseph Albahari and Ben Albahari, 978-1-491-92706-9.

states the following at page 96, after introducing Implicit Calling of Parameterless Base-Class Constructor:

If the base class has no accessible parameterless constructor, subclasses are forced to use the base keyword in their constructors.

I am trying to create a code snippet to corroborate that, but did not yet succeed.

My snippet:

public class X
{
    public int Num { get; set; }

    public void Method_1()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("X");
    }

    public virtual void Method_2()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Num);
    }
}

public class Y : X
{
    public Y()
    {
        Num = 1000;
    }
}

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    new Y().Method_2();
}

I expected to get a compiler error, following the book affirmation, but I get none. The code runs and correctly prints 1000.

My question is: what does the book mean with subclasses being forced to use the base keyword ? I am trying to reproduce such scenario.

What am I missing ?

10

The class Y does have access to a parameterless constructor for the base class, X, since if a class defines no constructor there is an implicit parameterless constructor.

If you write:

public class X
{
    public X(int i){}
}

Then there will no longer be an accessible parameterless constructor of X in Y.

  • But how does this point out a case where a subclass is forced to use the base keyword ? – Veverke Jul 19 '16 at 14:51
  • 3
    @Veverke - did you try adding that constructor to your X class? If so, you should have started getting compiler errors. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 19 '16 at 14:52
  • @Damien_The_Unbeliever: adding such a constructor forces me to either change the current Y constructor to receive an in parameter as well - or alternatively to add a parameterless constructor to X. Or - I could solely add a base(0) call to Y's current constructor. In the last case, I ended up being forced to use the base keyword (which is the sole point being questioned), although it does not make much sense to call a constructor which requires parameters you do not have. At least this third scenario, of the 3, illustrates being forced to use the base keyword. – Veverke Jul 19 '16 at 15:03
  • @Veverke Techically you don't need to have Y's constructor accept parameters, you just need to have it use the base keyword to explicitly call a non-parameterless constructor of X. If you add a parameterless constructor to X, then obviously Y has an accessible parameterless constructor of X, and doesn't need to use the base keyword. – Servy Jul 19 '16 at 15:06
  • @Servy: you just need to have it use the base keyword to explicitly call a non-parameterless constructor of X is what I refer to in the comment above as the 3rd scenario (where I use base(0)) – Veverke Jul 19 '16 at 15:09
5

The problem stems for a misunderstanding of your example code. Because you've not defined any constructor in class X C# has defined an implicit one for you. This implicit constructor is a no-arg constructor.

The quote you're mentioning refers to the case where you've actually written a non-default constructor.

Writing the non-default constructor suppresses the generation of an implicit constuctor. This means you're forced to explicitly call another constructor from the constructor of the Dervived class using the base keyword

 class BaseClass
 {
     public BaseClass(int i) {}
 }

 class Derived : BaseClass
 {
     public Derived() : base(44) { }
 }
  • This does not answer the question. I ask about what the book means by being forced to use base keyword. – Veverke Jul 19 '16 at 14:38
  • 1
    There's no need to create a private parameterless constructor, so long as there is one that's not parameterless. – Servy Jul 19 '16 at 14:39
  • @Servy good point. Amended my answer – Andy Skirrow Jul 19 '16 at 14:48
  • 2
    @Veverke All the base keyword does is allow you to change which constructor is called. If you don't write it, base() will automatically be inserted. That means, if you don't have a parameterless constructor that is accessible (because it does not exist or it's private) you are forced to use base explicitly. That's all the book is trying to say. – Dennis_E Jul 19 '16 at 14:53
  • 1
    @Veverke In this case, it does exist, because the compiler automatically inserts it (as the answers are saying, too) If you do provide a constructor (either a private one or one with parameters) then the compiler will not insert anything and so, you will not have an accessible parameterless constructor. – Dennis_E Jul 19 '16 at 14:59
0

Same rules, except...

This is actually no different than the regular rules for accessing members any other member of the base class.

The constructor is little more than a regular function.

The key difference is that the derived class automatically tries to call the base constructor. Specifically the base constructor that doesn't take parameters.

If no constructor exists, you get an error. If it exists but you don't have "permission" to access it, you get an error.

If you don't specify any constructors at all for the base class then that class is assumed to have a parameterless constructor that does nothing.

Put another way if you don't specify a constructor at all one is implicitly created for you.

Here are 7 examples of when you will and won't face this issue:

Example 3 - OK - Implied default empty constructor

    class Base
    {
        // No constructor explicitly defined so a default constructor is assumed
        // Having no constructor at all is like having an empty constructor
        // Like this: Base() { }
    }

    class Derived : Base
    {
        // OK - Explicitly calling accessible base constructor
        public Derived() { }
    }

Example 2 - OK - Accessible base constructor

    class Base {
        // "public" so it's accessible by derived class
        public Base() { } // no parameters - aka parameterless
    }

    class Derived : Base {
        // OK - implicitly calls accessible parameterless constructor base()
        public Derived() {}
    }

Example 3 - OK - Protected means still accessible

    class Base {
        // "protected" so it's accessible by derived class
        protected Base() { } // no parameters - aka parameterless
    }

    class Derived : Base {
        // OK - implicitly calls accessible parameterless constructor base()
        public Derived() {}
    }

Example 4 - FAIL - Private is not accessible

    class Base {
        // "private" so it's NOT accessible by derived class
        private Base() { } // no parameters - aka parameterless
    }

    class Derived : Base {
        // FAIL - tries to implicitly call parameterless constructor base()
        // ERROR CS0122 - Base.Base() is inaccessible due to it's protection level
        public Derived() { } 
    }

Example 5 - FAIL - Always tries to call parameterless constructor

    class Base {
        // "private" so it's NOT accessible by derived class
        private Base() { } // no parameters - aka parameterless

        // "protected" so it's accessible by derived class
        protected Base(int a) { } // has parameter - aka NOT parameterless
    }

    class Derived : Base {
        // FAIL - STILL tries to implicitly call parameterless constructor base()
        // ERROR CS0122 - Base.Base() is inaccessible due to it's protection level
        public Derived() { } 
    }

Example 6 - FAIL - Unless it doesn't exist, then assumes calling the other

    class Base
    {
        // notice there is not parameterless constructor 
        // just one constructor does does have parameters

        // "protected" so it's accessible by derived class
        protected Base(int a) { } // has parameter - aka NOT parameterless
    }

    class Derived : Base
    {
        // FAIL - STILL tries to implicitly call parameterless constructor base() which doesn't exist
        // ERROR CS7036 - There is no argument given that corresponds to the required formal parameter 'a' of Base.Base(int)
        public Derived() { }
    }

Example 7 - OK - Unless you call one yourself

    class Base
    {
        // "private" so it's NOT accessible by derived class
        private Base() { } // no parameters - aka parameterless

        // "protected" so it's accessible by derived class
        protected Base(int a) { } // has parameter - aka NOT parameterless
    }

    class Derived : Base
    {
        // OK - Explicitly calling accessible base constructor with `int` parameter
        public Derived() 
            : base(10) 
            { }
    }

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