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There is this getNextPlayer() function that counts forwards, but I want to adapt it for a card game that occasionally requires counting backwards.

def GetNextPlayer(self, p):
    """ Return the player to the left of the specified player, skipping players who have been knocked out
    """
    next = (p % self.numberOfPlayers) + 1
    # Skip any knocked-out players
    while next != p and self.knockedOut[next]:
        next = (next % self.numberOfPlayers) + 1
    return next

Its from a gard game script found at http://www.aifactory.co.uk/newsletter/ISMCTS.txt and is part of a larger monte carlo tree search algorithm. I tried next=(p%self.numberOfPlayers)-1 but it produces invalid values

  • what does "occasionally" mean here? – turnip Jul 20 '16 at 12:37
  • Is it possible to reverse the input instead? – Chris_Rands Jul 20 '16 at 12:38
  • @PPG There is a local game called Matatu only played in uganda and if a Jack is played, the direction of play is reversed. – Dr Deo Jul 20 '16 at 12:41
  • Can you edit your question to include what you have tried and "produces invalid values"? – Dave Jul 20 '16 at 12:42
  • @MutationalMeltdown p is the current player, I dont know if providing the last player won't just give the current player, hence a No operation – Dr Deo Jul 20 '16 at 12:43
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Just changing the +1 to -1 produces invalid values because the modulo operator ignores the sign in the case where you would do 0 - 1 % self.numberOfPlayers. E.g. -1 % 4 == 3

Update, thanks to @pwnsauce, this should produce what you need:

p - 1 if p >= 1 else self.numberOfPlayers - 1

This assumes that player indices start at 0 and go to self.numberOfPlayers-1

|improve this answer|||||
  • I'm not convinced of the modulo necessity. wouldn't a : p - 1 if p >= 1 else self.numberOfPlayers - 1 be the same ? – pwnsauce Jul 20 '16 at 12:57
  • @pwnsauce that's true. And it's much cleaner. I will update the answer. Thanks for pointing it out. – Dave Jul 20 '16 at 12:59
  • It wasn't necessary in the GetNextPlayer() either btw. – pwnsauce Jul 20 '16 at 13:01
  • @pwnsauce that's true, although it is quite concise in the original GetNextPlayer(). For me, I always have the notion of 'wraps around' when I see % operators. – Dave Jul 20 '16 at 13:21
  • yup it's concise. I think the player indice start at 1 tho. because next = (p % self.numberOfPlayers) + 1 return something between/equal 1 and self.numberOfPlayers – pwnsauce Jul 20 '16 at 13:27
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You could use something like this:

def GetNextPlayer(self, p, forward=True):
    """ Return the player to the left of the specified player, skipping players who have been knocked out
    """
    def get_next():
        ref = p if forward else p + self.numberOfPlayers - 1
        return p + 1

    next = get_next()
    # Skip any knocked-out players
    while next != p and self.knockedOut[next]:
        next = get_next()
    return next

I have separated the reference (count starting from 0) and periodic property (modulo operation). And also made it generic for both backward and forward

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  • This produces an error as it is written there, because get_next() doesn't take any arguments, yet you pass one when calling it here: get_next(forward) – Dave Jul 20 '16 at 13:08
  • Sorry. Corrected. Initially i had placed the forward argument inside the inner function. Later forget to remove it. Does it work? – DurgaDatta Jul 20 '16 at 13:10
  • I am not the OP but, with all due respect, if you post complete code, like the method you wrote, you should be reasonably sure that it will actually work. I commented on it because I was sure it wouldn't work. – Dave Jul 20 '16 at 13:22

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