10

I'm trying to use the Jenkins/Kubernetes plugin to orchestrate docker slaves with Jenkins.

I'm using this plugin: https://github.com/jenkinsci/kubernetes-plugin

My problem is that all the slaves are offline so the job can't execute:

Slave status

enter image description here

I have tried this on my local box using minikube, and on a K8 Cluster hosted by our ops group. I've tried both Jenkins 1.9 and Jenkins 2. I always get the same result. The screenshots are from Jenkins 1.642.4, K8 v1.2.0

Here is my configuration... note that when I click 'test connection' I get a success. Also note I didn't need any credentials (this is the only difference I can see vs the documented example).

Jenkins System Configuration

The Jenkins log shows the following over and over:

    Waiting for slave to connect (11/100): docker-6b55f1b7fafce
Jul 20, 2016 5:01:06 PM INFO org.csanchez.jenkins.plugins.kubernetes.KubernetesCloud$ProvisioningCallback call
Waiting for slave to connect (12/100): docker-6b55f1b7fafce
Jul 20, 2016 5:01:07 PM INFO org.csanchez.jenkins.plugins.kubernetes.KubernetesCloud$ProvisioningCallback call
Waiting for slave to connect (13/100): docker-6b55f1b7fafce
Jul 20, 2016 5:01:08 PM INFO org.csanchez.jenkins.plugins.kubernetes.KubernetesCloud$ProvisioningCallback call

When I run kubectl get events I see this:

24s         24s        1         docker-6b3c2ff27dad3   Pod                                Normal    Scheduled           {default-scheduler }      Successfully assigned docker-6b3c2ff27dad3 to 96.xxx.xx.159
24s         23s        2         docker-6b3c2ff27dad3   Pod                                Warning   MissingClusterDNS   {kubelet 96.xxx.xx.159}   kubelet does not have ClusterDNS IP configured and cannot create Pod using "ClusterFirst" policy. Falling back to DNSDefault policy.
23s         23s        1         docker-6b3c2ff27dad3   Pod       spec.containers{slave}   Normal    Pulled              {kubelet 96.xxx.xx.159}   Container image "jenkinsci/jnlp-slave" already present on machine
23s         23s        1         docker-6b3c2ff27dad3   Pod       spec.containers{slave}   Normal    Created             {kubelet 96.xxx.xx.159}   Created container with docker id 82fcf1bd0328
23s         23s        1         docker-6b3c2ff27dad3   Pod       spec.containers{slave}   Normal    Started             {kubelet 96.xxx.xx.159}   Started container with docker id 82fcf1bd0328

Any ideas?

UPDATE: more log info as suggested by csanchez

 ➜  docker git:(master) ✗ kubectl get pods --namespace default -o wide
NAME                   READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE       NODE
docker-6bb647254a2a4   1/1       Running   0          1m        96.x.x.159

➜  docker git:(master) ✗ kubectl log docker-6bafbac10b392

    Jul 20, 2016 6:45:10 PM hudson.remoting.jnlp.Main$CuiListener status
INFO: Connecting to 96.x.x.159:50000 (retrying:10)
java.net.ConnectException: Connection refused
    at java.net.PlainSocketImpl.socketConnect(Native Method)
    at java.net.AbstractPlainSocketImpl.doConnect(AbstractPlainSocketImpl.java:350)
    at java.net.AbstractPlainSocketImpl.connectToAddress(AbstractPlainSocketImpl.java:206)
    at java.net.AbstractPlainSocketImpl.connect(AbstractPlainSocketImpl.java:188)
    at java.net.SocksSocketImpl.connect(SocksSocketImpl.java:392)

I'll have to look at what this port 50000 is used for??

3
  • You need to check why your pods have failed to connect. kubectl get pods and the check the logs of the failing pods
    – csanchez
    Jul 20 '16 at 18:27
  • updated with log info, thanks! Jul 20 '16 at 18:58
  • Got it, @csanchez ! So the issue was that jenkins was also running in k8, so the port 50000 was dynamic. changing the jenkins tunnel to the port that k8 assigned solved the problem. Jul 20 '16 at 19:09
4

When running jenkins in Kubernetes, the service name is resolvable by both the jenkins master and slaves.

The best way to configure this is than the use the internal DNS and set the jenkins url to:

http://jenkins:8080

(assuming you called your service jenkins, and your port on the service is 8080)

No tunnel is required.

The benefit of this approach is that it will survive restarts of your jenkins without reconfiguration.

Secondary benefit is that you would not have to expose Jenkins to the outside world, thus limiting security risks.

3

I just want to add a bit more explanation to the above answers for newbies.

While exposing the jenkins UI, you also need to expose internal port 50000 Here is a simple service for a jenkins deployment:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: jenkins
  namespace: jenkins
spec:
  type: NodePort
  ports:
    - port: 8080
      name: "http"
      nodePort: 30000
      targetPort: 8080
    - port: 50000
      name: "slave"
      nodePort: 30010
      targetPort: 50000
  selector:
    app: jenkins

For external access to the Jenkins UI, nodePort is being used in the above configuration. I'm exposing port 8080 to the nodePort 30000 (jenkins UI will now available at node_ip:30000) and exposing pod port 50000 to nodeport 30010.

Once the svc is created:

$ kubectl get svc -n jenkins
NAME      CLUSTER-IP    EXTERNAL-IP   PORT(S)                          AGE
jenkins   10.233.5.94   <nodes>       8080:30000/TCP,50000:30010/TCP   23m

Now add jenkins_ip:30010 as Jenkins Tunnel.

2
  • I did exactly this Junaid. But my slaves are still showing offline. Is there any other thing which I might be missing? May 17 '18 at 19:33
  • @Daggerhunt, does the slave actually get created? Have you confirmed with kubectl get po -n <namespace> command?
    – Junaid
    May 29 '18 at 23:58
2

You need to expose both port 8080 and 50000 as described in the plugin example config https://github.com/jenkinsci/kubernetes-plugin/blob/master/src/main/kubernetes/jenkins.yml

1
  • link is broken now
    – Larry Cai
    Aug 28 '17 at 20:40
2

Thanks to @csanchez I have the solution.

enter image description here

The problem was that I am running the jenkins server in k8 and I didn't specify a fixed port in k8 (I let k8 pick the port). So changing the config for the jenkins tunnel solved it.

A better solution is to have the port be fixed as suggested, making that change next.

1
  • I tried this out. I also had changed TCP port for JNLP slave agents] to random. I have also exposed the jnlp and UI ports using NodePort and I am using those ports in the configuration but still I can't get it to work. Any help would be highly appreciated. May 17 '18 at 19:27
1

Because, kubectl -n jenkins-namespace get services shows :

NAME                 TYPE        CLUSTER-IP       EXTERNAL-IP   PORT(S)     AGE
cicd-jenkins         ClusterIP   172.20.120.227   <none>        8080/TCP    128d
cicd-jenkins-agent   ClusterIP   172.20.105.189   <none>        50000/TCP   128d

You have to go to Jenkins > Manage Jenkins > Configure System (http://jenkins:8080/configure). Then, configure Jenkins URL and jenkins tunnel accordingly (see screenshot below )

CREDITS to https://youtu.be/MkzCVvlpiaM

enter image description here

If you'are using the Jenkins Configuration as Code (JCasC) plugin this is configured via jenkinsUrl and jenkinsTunnel keys :

jenkins:
  clouds:
  - kubernetes:
      name: cluster
      serverUrl: https://kubernetes.default
      # ....
      jenkinsUrl: http://cicd-jenkins:8080/
      jenkinsTunnel:  cicd-jenkins-agent:50000
      # ....
0

I know this is an old post, but no one of the above answers solved my issue with offline Jenkins agents Anyway, I have managed to solve this issue by my self and I will leave here the solution!

Note 1: My Kubernetes cluster is running on 3 VMs, locally, by using Hyper-V and I do not use Nginx!

Note 2: The Jenkins master is running on Kubernetes pod!

Note 3: You can checkout my git repository here: https://github.com/RazvanSebastian/Kubernetes_Cluster/tree/master/3_jenkins_setup

  1. Create a namespace for Jenkins

$ kubectl create namespace jenkins

  1. Create a service-account because Jenkins master will need permissions to create/delete resources, such as Jenkins-Slave pods
---
apiVersion: v1
kind: ServiceAccount
metadata:
  name: jenkins
  namespace: jenkins
---
apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
kind: Role
metadata:
  name: jenkins
  namespace: jenkins
rules:
- apiGroups: [""]
  resources: ["pods"]
  verbs: ["create","delete","get","list","patch","update","watch"]
- apiGroups: [""]
  resources: ["pods/exec"]
  verbs: ["create","delete","get","list","patch","update","watch"]
- apiGroups: [""]
  resources: ["pods/log"]
  verbs: ["get","list","watch"]
- apiGroups: [""]
  resources: ["secrets"]
  verbs: ["get"]
---
apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
kind: RoleBinding
metadata:
  name: jenkins
  namespace: jenkins
roleRef:
  apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
  kind: Role
  name: jenkins
subjects:
- kind: ServiceAccount
  name: jenkins
  1. We have to create two services;

NodePort will let the Jenkins master to be accessible from the outside of the Kubernetes cluster

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: jenkins
  namespace: jenkins
spec:
  ports:
    - protocol: TCP
      port: 8080
      targetPort: 8080
      nodePort: 30123
      name: ui
  selector:
    app: master
  type: NodePort

ClusterIp which will work like a discovery service for the internal Jenkins-Slaves. By default the master is listening on port 5000 for the inbound agents!

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: jenkins-discovery
  namespace: jenkins
spec:
  selector:
    app: master
  ports:
    - protocol: TCP
      port: 50000
      targetPort: 50000
      name: slaves
  1. Now we have to create a Deployment for Jenkins master
apiVersion: apps/v1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
  name: jenkins
  namespace: jenkins
spec:
  replicas: 1
  selector:
    matchLabels:
       app: master
  template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        app: master
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: jenkins
      containers:
        - image: jenkins/jenkins:lts
          name: jenkins
          ports:
            - containerPort: 8080
              name: http-port
            - containerPort: 50000
              name: jnlp-port
          env:
            - name: JAVA_OPTS
              value: -Djenkins.install.runSetupWizard=false

OBSERVATION 1 : The Jenkins master container has to expose both ports: 8080 ( UI Jenkins port) and 50000 ( for the inbound agents). If you do not expose the 5000 port you will receive an offline status from Jenkins-Slaves

OBSERVATION 2 : The serviceAccountName: jenkins line from the Deployment template will bind to Jenkins the authority to create/delete Kubernetes resources

  1. Check the resources created into jenkins namespace

$ kubectl get all -o wide --namespace=jenkins

Note Copy the IP from the Jenkins pod; we will need it to set up the Jenkins

  1. Get the Kubernetes master node address

$ kubectl cluster-info | grep master

  1. Now we have to configure the Jenkins from UI. I will append the images but you can check the git repo also :)

    7.1. Install packages (Manage Jenkins -> Manage Plugins -> Available) : Kubernetes and SSH Agent

    7.2. Setup Master node (Manage Jenkins -> Manage Nodes and Clouds -> Tool Icon): enter image description here

    7.3. Setup Kubernetes plugin (Manage Jenkins -> Configure System -> At the bottom of the page click the Cloud section) enter image description here

enter image description here

7.4. Make sure that when you are creating a Jenkins job the restriction like this: enter image description here

0

if your jenkins master and agent pods are in the same cluster then jenkinsUrl is enough.

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: jenkins-prod-service
  namespace: my-prod
spec:
  selector:
    app: jenkins-prod
  ports:
    - port: 50000
      targetPort: 50000
      name: jnlp-port
    - port: 8080
      name: http-port
      targetPort: 8080
  type: ClusterIP

then jcasc:

jenkinsUrl: http://jenkins-prod-service:8080/

jenkins can figure out jenkinsTunnel value. Also you don't need to define serverUrl.

You need to define jenkinsTunnel if you use external cluster.

Example of a service when using external cluster

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: jenkins-prod-service
  namespace: my-ns
spec:
  selector:
    app: jenkins-prod #jenkins-master
  ports:
    - port: 50000
      nodePort: 34321    
      targetPort: 50000
      name: jnlp-port
    - port: 8080
      nodePort: 31234    
      name: http-port
      targetPort: 8080
  type: NodePort

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