5

I need to empty IEnumerable list i tried many things like null and none of them worked

this how my model looks like

public class NewsViewModel
{
    public NewsViewModel()
    {
        this.Categories = new List<Category>();
    }

    public int NewsId { get; set; }
    public string NewsTitle { get; set; }
    public string NewsBody { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<Category> Categories { get; set; }
}

if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(SelectedCategoriesIds))
{
    List<Category> stringList = new List<Category>();
    stringList.AddRange(SelectedCategoriesIds.Split(',').Select(i => new Category() { CategoryId = int.Parse(i) }));
    model.Categories = stringList.AsEnumerable();
}
else
{
    model.Categories = null;
}

How to make model.Categories empty ?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Servy, e4c5, Ilja Everilä, Drew, JAL Aug 1 '16 at 16:31

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    i tried many things like null and none of them worked ... How? – Rahul Jul 20 '16 at 21:17
  • When you expose only the IEnumerable<T> interface, you are intending that the downstream use for this interface will be to hand out something that should be enumerated. The IEnumerable<T> contract does not include any members that relate to modifying the underlying collection. Perhaps you should expose ICollection<T> instead? – spender Jul 20 '16 at 21:22
  • why do you need to convert List to IEnumerable? Why can't you just declare as List<T> in your class? Is there a specific reason? – techspider Jul 20 '16 at 21:24
2

If assigning a new value

You can also use an empty array for this

  if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(SelectedCategoriesIds))
  {
           List<Category> stringList = new List<Category>();
           stringList.AddRange(
                SelectedCategoriesIds.Split(',')
                     .Select(i => new Category() { CategoryId = int.Parse(i) }));
            model.Categories = stringList.AsEnumerable();
 }
 else
 {
      //set the property to an empty arrary
      model.Categories = new Category[]{};
 }

This is less efficient than @DavidL's answer but is an alternative way to create an empty enumerable

If the enumerable is always a list and you want to clear it instead make the property type IList

If you're model always has a list and you want to clear it instead, then change the model and access the method that way.

 public class NewsViewModel
 {
    public NewsViewModel()
    {
        this.Categories = new List<Category>();
    }
    public int NewsId { get; set; }
    public string NewsTitle { get; set; }
    public string NewsBody { get; set; }

    public IList<Category> Categories { get; set; }

}

Then in your if statement you can use clear

else
 {
      //Now clear is available
      model.Categories.Clear();
 }
23

Use Enumerable.Empty<T>().

model.Categories = Enumerable.Empty<Category>();

The Empty() method caches an empty sequence of type TResult. When the object it returns is enumerated, it yields no elements.

An enumerable sequence with no elements is different from null. If you return null for IEnumerable<T> and then attempt to enumerate it, you will receive a NullReferenceException.

On the other hand, if you return Enumerable.Empty<T>() and attempt to enumerate it, the code will execute just fine without the need for a null check, since there are no elements to enumerate.

It is worth noting that Enumerable.Empty<T>() is also more efficient than returning new List<T>() since a new list object does not need to be allocated.

You cannot use .Clear() in this instance because your IEnumerable<T> is a projectable sequence that is not materialized until enumerated. There isn't anything to clear yet.

Finally, as spender mentioned below, this will only update this particular reference. If anything else also is holding a reference to your IEnumerable<T>, it would not reflect the change unless you specifically passed in model.Categories via ref.

Alternatively, you can cast to List<Category> and call .Clear(), which would clear the underlying collection, updating all references. However, you will also need to perform an explicit null check when doing so, as mentioned in other answers. Note however, that this is also a very aggressive action. You are not updating only this instance, but all instances which may or may not have side effects. You need to determine which is more appropriate based on intent and needs.

  • 1
    Replacement isn't clearing. Anything else that had a reference to the old IEnumerable<Category> won't know this has happened. – spender Jul 20 '16 at 21:18
  • 1
    model.Categories.Clear() will empty out an existing IEnumerable. model.Categories = new IEnumerable<whatever>() will create a new empty one. It may not be a nullable type - that would explain why it can't be set to null. – Dave Smash Jul 20 '16 at 21:20
2

Just create empty list and asign it.

model.Categories = new List<Category>();
0

Try it this way:

(model.Categories as List<Category>)?.Clear();
  • So, maybe clear the enumerable if it happens to be a list, otherwise do nothing? That doesn't seem like a very clear statement of intent to me. – spender Jul 20 '16 at 21:27
  • There is no guarantee that model.Categories is a list, and if it isn't this just silently fails – konkked Jul 20 '16 at 21:27
  • So if you want to clear a collection the property should not be a IEnumerable<T> but instead a IList<T>. – Udo Jul 20 '16 at 21:31

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