11

Suppose I have a file as follows (a sorted, unique list of integers, one per line):

1
3
4
5
8
9
10

I would like the following output (i.e. the missing integers in the list):

2
6
7

How can I accomplish this within a bash terminal (using awk or a similar solution, preferably a one-liner)?

19

Using awk you can do this:

awk '{for(i=p+1; i<$1; i++) print i} {p=$1}' file

2
6
7
4
  • Can you explain me this logic please.
    – Abhinay
    Jan 9 '19 at 5:15
  • 3
    Variable p contains value from previous record and we loop from p+1 to current row's value.
    – anubhava
    Jan 9 '19 at 6:48
  • 1
    why this answer is not coming at the top instead of being the highest rated and accepted one ? Sep 22 '21 at 18:38
  • 1
    @GauravKansal: Click on Oldest or Votes sorting option on bottom right corner of the question
    – anubhava
    Sep 22 '21 at 18:49
5

Using seq and grep:

seq $(head -n1 file) $(tail -n1 file) | grep -vwFf file -

seq creates the full sequence, grep removes the lines that exists in the file from it.

2
  • I didn't personally find the - necessary, is there a reason it's there? Nov 10 '20 at 4:51
  • It's not necessary, it means the standard input, which is also the default.
    – choroba
    Nov 10 '20 at 8:55
1
perl -nE 'say for $a+1 .. $_-1; $a=$_'
0
0

Calling no external program (if filein contains the list of numbers):

#!/bin/bash
i=0
while read num; do
    while (( ++i<num )); do
        echo $i
    done
done <filein
0

To adapt choroba's clever answer for my own use case, I needed my sequence to deal with zero-padded numbers.

The -w switch to seq is the magic here - it automatically pads the first number with the necessary number of zeroes to keep it aligned with the second number:

-w, --equal-width     equalize width by padding with leading zeroes

My integers go from 0 to 9999, so I used the following:

seq -w 0 9999 | grep -vwFf "file.txt"

...which finds the missing integers in a sequence from 0000 to 9999. Or to put it back into the more universal solution in choroba's answer:

seq -w $(head -n1 "file.txt") $(tail -n1 "file.txt") | grep -vwFf "file.txt"

I didn't personally find the - in his answer was necessary, but there may be usecases which make it so.

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