97

I came across this new feature in C# which allows a catch handler to execute when a specific condition is met.

int i = 0;
try
{
    throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(i));
}
catch (ArgumentNullException e)
when (i == 1)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Caught Argument Null Exception");
}

I am trying to understand when this may ever be useful.

One scenario could be something like this:

try
{
    DatabaseUpdate()
}
catch (SQLException e)
when (driver == "MySQL")
{
    //MySQL specific error handling and wrapping up the exception
}
catch (SQLException e)
when (driver == "Oracle")
{
    //Oracle specific error handling and wrapping up of exception
}
..

but this is again something that I can do within the same handler and delegate to different methods depending on the type of the driver. Does this make the code easier to understand? Arguably no.

Another scenario that I can think of is something like:

try
{
    SomeOperation();
}
catch(SomeException e)
when (Condition == true)
{
    //some specific error handling that this layer can handle
}
catch (Exception e) //catchall
{
    throw;
}

Again this is something that I can do like:

try
{
    SomeOperation();
}
catch(SomeException e)
{
    if (condition == true)
    {
        //some specific error handling that this layer can handle
    }
    else
        throw;
}

Does using the 'catch, when' feature make exception handling faster because the handler is skipped as such and the stack unwinding can happen much earlier as when compared to handling the specific use cases within the handler? Are there any specific use cases that fit this feature better which people can then adopt as a good practice?

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  • 9
    It's useful if the when needs to access the exception itself – Tim Schmelter Jul 21 '16 at 7:37
  • 1
    But that is something we can do within the handler block itself as well right. Are there any benefits apart from a 'slightly more organized code'? – MS Srikkanth Jul 21 '16 at 7:40
  • 3
    But then you have already handled the exception which you don't want. What if you want to catch it somewhere else in this try..catch...catch..catch..finally? – Tim Schmelter Jul 21 '16 at 7:40
  • 4
    @user3493289: Following that argument, we don't need automatich type checks in exception handlers either: We can only allow catch (Exception ex), check the type and throw otherwise. Slightly more organized code (aka avoiding code noise) is exactly why this feature exists. (This is actually true for a lot of features.) – Heinzi Jul 21 '16 at 7:42
  • 2
    @TimSchmelter Thanks. Post it as an answer and I will accept it. So the actual scenario would then be 'if the condition for handling depends on the exception', then use this feature/ – MS Srikkanth Jul 21 '16 at 7:42
122

Catch blocks already allow you to filter on the type of the exception:

catch (SomeSpecificExceptionType e) {...}

The when clause allows you to extend this filter to generic expressions.

Thus, you use the when clause for cases where the type of the exception is not distinct enough to determine whether the exception should be handled here or not.


A common use case are exception types which are actually a wrapper for multiple, different kinds of errors.

Here's a case that I've actually used (in VB, which already has this feature for quite some time):

try
{
    SomeLegacyComOperation();
}
catch (COMException e) when (e.ErrorCode == 0x1234)
{
    // Handle the *specific* error I was expecting. 
}

Same for SqlException, which also has an ErrorCode property. The alternative would be something like that:

try
{
    SomeLegacyComOperation();
}
catch (COMException e)
{
    if (e.ErrorCode == 0x1234)
    {
        // Handle error
    }
    else
    {
        throw;
    }
}

which is arguably less elegant and slightly breaks the stack trace.

In addition, you can mention the same type of exception twice in the same try-catch-block:

try
{
    SomeLegacyComOperation();
}
catch (COMException e) when (e.ErrorCode == 0x1234)
{
    ...
}
catch (COMException e) when (e.ErrorCode == 0x5678)
{
    ...
}

which would not be possible without the when condition.

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  • 2
    The second approach also does not allow to catch it in a different catch, does it? – Tim Schmelter Jul 21 '16 at 7:39
  • @TimSchmelter. True. You'd have to handle all COMExceptions in the same block. – Heinzi Jul 21 '16 at 7:44
  • While the when allows you to handle the same exception type multiple times. You should mention that as well since it's a crucial difference. Without when you'll get a compiler error. – Tim Schmelter Jul 21 '16 at 7:46
  • 1
    As far as I'm concerned, the part following "In a nutshell:" should be the first line of the answer. – CompuChip Jul 21 '16 at 7:52
  • 1
    @user3493289: that is often the case with ugly-ass code though. You think "I shouldn't be in this mess in the first place, redesign the code", and you also think "there could be a way to support this design elegantly, redesign the language". In this case there's a kind of threshold for how ugly you want your set of catch clauses to be, so something that makes certain situations less ugly lets you get more done within your threshold :-) – Steve Jessop Jul 21 '16 at 10:42
38

From Roslyn's wiki (emphasis mine):

Exception filters are preferable to catching and rethrowing because they leave the stack unharmed. If the exception later causes the stack to be dumped, you can see where it originally came from, rather than just the last place it was rethrown.

It is also a common and accepted form of “abuse” to use exception filters for side effects; e.g. logging. They can inspect an exception “flying by” without intercepting its course. In those cases, the filter will often be a call to a false-returning helper function which executes the side effects:

private static bool Log(Exception e) { /* log it */ ; return false; }

… try { … } catch (Exception e) when (Log(e)) { }

The first point is worth demonstrating.

static class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A(1);
    }

    private static void A(int i)
    {
        try
        {
            B(i + 1);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            if (ex.Message != "!")
                Console.WriteLine(ex);
            else throw;
        }
    }

    private static void B(int i)
    {
        throw new Exception("!");
    }
}

If we run this in WinDbg until the exception is hit, and print the stack using !clrstack -i -a we'll see the just the frame of A:

003eef10 00a7050d [DEFAULT] Void App.Program.A(I4)

PARAMETERS:
  + int i  = 1

LOCALS:
  + System.Exception ex @ 0x23e3178
  + (Error 0x80004005 retrieving local variable 'local_1')

However, if we change the program to use when:

catch (Exception ex) when (ex.Message != "!")
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex);
}

We'll see the stack also contains B's frame:

001af2b4 01fb05aa [DEFAULT] Void App.Program.B(I4)

PARAMETERS:
  + int i  = 2

LOCALS: (none)

001af2c8 01fb04c1 [DEFAULT] Void App.Program.A(I4)

PARAMETERS:
  + int i  = 1

LOCALS:
  + System.Exception ex @ 0x2213178
  + (Error 0x80004005 retrieving local variable 'local_1')

That information can be very useful when debugging crash dumps.

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  • 8
    That surprises me. Won't throw; (as opposed to throw ex;) leave the stack unharmed as well? +1 for the side effect thing. I'm not sure I approve of that, but it's good to know about that technique. – Heinzi Jul 21 '16 at 7:48
  • 14
    It's not wrong - this doesn't refer to the stack trace - it refers to the stack itself. If you look at the stack in a debugger (WinDbg), and even if you've used throw;, the stack unwinds and you lose the parameter values. – Eli Arbel Jul 21 '16 at 7:54
  • 1
    This can be extremely useful when debugging dumps. – Eli Arbel Jul 21 '16 at 7:57
  • 3
    @Heinzi See my answer in another thread where you can see that throw; changes the stack trace a little and throw ex; changes it a lot. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 21 '16 at 8:23
  • 1
    Using throw does disturb the stack trace slightly. Line numbers are different when using throw as opposed to when. – Mike Zboray Jul 21 '16 at 8:23
7

When an exception is thrown, the first pass of exception handling identifies where the exception will get caught before unwinding the stack; if/when the "catch" location is identified, all "finally" blocks are run (note that if an exception escapes a "finally" block, processing of the earlier exception may be abandoned). Once that happens, code will resume execution at the "catch".

If there is a breakpoint within a function that's evaluated as part of a "when", that breakpoint will suspend execution before any stack unwinding occurs; by contrast, a breakpoint at a "catch" will only suspend execution after all finally handlers have run.

Finally, if lines 23 and 27 of foo call bar, and the call on line 23 throws an exception which is caught within foo and rethrown on line 57, then the stack trace will suggest that the exception occurred while calling bar from line 57 [location of the rethrow], destroying any information about whether the exception occurred in the line-23 or line-27 call. Using when to avoid catching an exception in the first place avoids such disturbance.

BTW, a useful pattern which is annoyingly awkward in both C# and VB.NET is to use a function call within a when clause to set a variable which can be used within a finally clause to determine whether the function completed normally, to handle cases where a function has no hope of "resolving" any exception that occurs but must nonetheless take action based upon it. For example, if an exception is thrown within a factory method which is supposed to return an object that encapsulates resources, any resources that were acquired will need to be released, but the underlying exception should percolate up to the caller. The cleanest way to handle that semantically (though not syntactically) is to have a finally block check whether an exception occurred and, if so, release all resources acquired on behalf of the object that is no longer going to be returned. Since cleanup code has no hope of resolving whatever condition caused the exception, it really shouldn't catch it, but merely needs to know what happened. Calling a function like:

bool CopySecondArgumentToFirstAndReturnFalse<T>(ref T first, T second)
{
  first = second;
  return false;
}

within a when clause will make it possible for the factory function to know that something happened.

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