10

I'm a bit confused and can't explain this behaviour:

Vector3 k = new Vector3(Mathf.NegativeInfinity, Mathf.NegativeInfinity,Mathf.NegativeInfinity);
Debug.Log(k==k); // evaluates to False

though

Debug.Log(Mathf.Mathf.NegativeInfinity == Mathf.Mathf.NegativeInfinity)
// evaluates to True as expected

I'm using Unity Version 5.3.5f1.

  • Try looking inside the overloaded == operator with an IL browser. – GSerg Jul 21 '16 at 16:52
5

From Unity's documentation, == returns "true for vectors that are really close to being equal". However this implementation produces problems when the Vector is initialized with negative infinity for x,y,z.

Let's take a look at how == is defined for Vector3:

public static bool operator == (Vector3 lhs, Vector3 rhs) {
    return Vector3.SqrMagnitude (lhs - rhs) < 9.999999E-11;
}

Before doing SqrMagnitude, it will first perform lhs - rhs, so let's see how - is defined:

public static Vector3 operator - (Vector3 a, Vector3 b) {
    return new Vector3 (a.x - b.x, a.y - b.y, a.z - b.z);
}

This is fine for normal numbers, however, since a.x, b.x...etc. are Mathf.NegativeInfinity, the subtraction will result in NaN. Now when it does sqrMagnitude:

public float sqrMagnitude {
    get {
        return this.x * this.x + this.y * this.y + this.z * this.z;
    }
}

This will also return NaN.

From the docs, we note the following:

  • If either operand is NaN, the result is false for all operators except !=, for which the result is true.

Therefore, when we go back to this code:

return Vector3.SqrMagnitude (lhs - rhs) < 9.999999E-11;

It simplifies to return NaN < 9.999999E-11; which will return False as stated in the docs.


Also, the reason why Debug.Log(Mathf.Mathf.NegativeInfinity == Mathf.Mathf.NegativeInfinity) behaves as expected is documented here.

  • Negative and positive zeros are considered equal.
  • A negative infinity is considered less than all other values, but equal to another negative infinity.
  • A positive infinity is considered greater than all other values, but equal to another positive infinity.
2

Equality operator can be or can't be implemented. It's just an implementation detail of a given type. Or it can be also wrongly implemented.

Even when all properties from a given class may equal when comparing two references, if == and != aren't overloaded, or their implementation is wrong, it may end in unexpected results like yours.

For example:

public class A 
{
     public static operator bool ==(A left, A right) => false;
     public static operator bool !=(A left, A right) => false;
}

A a = new A();

bool equals = a == a; // false
bool notEquals = a != a // false

BTW:

bool referenceEquals = ReferenceEquals(a, a); // TRUE!
  • "Equality operator can be or can't be implemented. It's just an implementation detail of a given type. Or it can be also wrongly implemented" This is the problem. The == overload operator is implemented to test approximate equality. – Programmer Jul 21 '16 at 18:05
  • 1
    @Programmer Yeah, after all, it's an implementation detail. OP thought that == means always "absolutely equal" – Matías Fidemraizer Jul 21 '16 at 18:28
1

As Mathf.NegativeInfinity is not an actual number. It is just a representation of -Infinity. According to docs:

A representation of negative infinity (Read Only).

Initialising a Vector3 with Mathf.NegativeInfinity as x,y,z components will not work. If you try to print this vector you will get (-Infinity, -Infinity, -Infinity) instead of any numbers.

Running some tests show that float.MaxValue is the maximum value that behaves accordingly in Vector3.

And as Matías said in his answer about = operator. I believe that this is true for Vector3 class. Using Equals method will work as well.

here is sample code :

void Start () 
{
    Vector3 k = new Vector3(Mathf.NegativeInfinity, Mathf.NegativeInfinity,Mathf.NegativeInfinity);
    bool val = k==k;
    Debug.Log("Operator on Infinity Vector3: " + val);
    Debug.Log(k);
    Debug.Log("Equals Method on Infinity Vector3: " + k.Equals(k));

    val = (Mathf.NegativeInfinity == Mathf.NegativeInfinity);
    Debug.Log("Operator on float value: " + val);

    k = new Vector3(float.MaxValue, float.MaxValue,float.MaxValue);

    val = k==k ;
    Debug.Log("Operator on float.MaxValue: " + val);
    Debug.Log(k);
    Debug.Log("Equals Method on float.MaxValue: " + k.Equals(k));

}

Above code gives this results:

Operator on Infinity Vector3: False

(-Infinity, -Infinity, -Infinity)

Equals Method on Infinity Vector3: True

Operator on float value: True

Operator on float.MaxValue: True

(340282300000000000000000000000000000000.0, 340282300000000000000000000000000000000.0, 340282300000000000000000000000000000000.0)

Equals Method : on float.MaxValue: True

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.