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We already have a function in SQL that calculates nth working date excluding weekends and holidays, when you pass Startdate, Enddate and Workday(nth).. it gives you nth working day...

Working SQL Function:

FUNCTION [dbo].[getNthWorkingDate] 
   (
@StartDate as datetime,
@EndDate as datetime,
@WorkDay as int
  )
    RETURNS datetime
    AS
    BEGIN
-- Declare the return variable here
DECLARE @WorkDate as datetime, @LeaveYear as smallint,@iCount as int
set @LeaveYear = datepart(year, @StartDate)
set @iCount = 1
WHILE (@StartDate < @EndDate) 
    BEGIN   

        IF (DATENAME(WEEKDAY,@StartDate )  = 'SUNDAY') OR (DATENAME(WEEKDAY,@StartDate )  = 'SATURDAY')
            -- Just to keep the if statement with out code
            set @iCount = @iCount;
        ELSE IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM HOLIDAYS WHERE CAST (HOLIDAY + ' ' + CAST(@LeaveYear AS VARCHAR) AS DATETIME) = @StartDate)
            -- Just to keep the if statement with out code
            set @iCount = @iCount;
        ELSE
            begin 
                set @WorkDate = @StartDate
                if @iCount = @WorkDay
                    BREAK; 
                else
                    set @iCount = @iCount + 1;
            end 

        set @StartDate = dateadd(day, 1, @StartDate );
    END 
-- Return the result of the function
RETURN @WorkDate
END

I am Trying to recreate this function in ORACLE(new to oracle), i have made a few changes but couldn't get it working, i think i am missing something in the looping, any help would be appreciated... Thanks in Advance..

ORACLE Function:

create or replace FUNCTION GETNTHWORKINGDATE (pStartDate DATE,
                                          pEndDate DATE,
                                          pWorkDay NUMBER)
  RETURN DATE
  AS
  vStartDate DATE;
  vWorkDate DATE ;
  vCount NUMBER;
  vHoliday DATE;
  BEGIN
   vCount := 1;
  BEGIN
  SELECT HOLIDAY_DATE INTO vHoliday FROM HOLIDAY WHERE (to_char(HOLIDAY_DATE, 'MM DD') = to_char(pStartDate, 'MM DD'));
  EXCEPTION
   WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN       
    vHoliday := NULL;   
 END;    
 vStartDate := pStartDate;

BEGIN
WHILE (vStartDate < pEndDate)
LOOP 
   IF (to_char(vStartDate, 'DAY') = 'SUNDAY' ) OR (to_char(vStartDate, 'DAY') = 'SATURDAY') THEN
      vCount := vCount;
   ELSIF (to_char(vHoliday, 'MM DD') = to_char(vStartDate, 'MM DD')) THEN
      vCount := vCount;
   ELSE      
      vWorkDate := vStartDate; 
      IF vCount = pWorkDay THEN
        EXIT;
      ELSE  
      vCount := vCount + 1;            
    END IF;
  END IF;
      vStartDate := vStartDate + 1;
END LOOP;

END;

RETURN vWorkDate;

END GETNTHWORKINGDATE;
  • "couldn't get it working" is rather vague. Do you get an error? What error? Do you get the wrong result? What parameters are you passing, what result do you want and what result do you get? – Justin Cave Jul 21 '16 at 17:55
  • i am not getting any error, i am getting the wrong results, scenario 1:when i am passing startdate: 07/20/2016, end date: 07/30/2016, and the working day as 1, that should give me 1st working day 07/20/2016, i am getting this result, that is correct, scenario 2: for the same input when i set 07/20/2016 as a holiday i am getting 07/21/2016 as the working date, so that is correct. but it is not eliminating weekends, when i pass 07/16 as the start date it is giving me 07/16 as the result which is SATURDAY, i should get 07/18 as the first working date. – user6621250 Jul 21 '16 at 18:00
  • Also it is not calculating holiday when start date is not a holiday, scenario3: 07/20 is a holiday, i am passing 07/19 as startdate and workday as 2, so i should get 07/21 as the result. but it is giving me 07/20 which is set as a holiday in holiday table. – user6621250 Jul 21 '16 at 18:07
  • It would be useful to edit this information into your question. Providing the definition of the holiday table and whatever sample data is needed there would also allow others to run your code. – Justin Cave Jul 21 '16 at 18:09
  • This function should run for others.. they only need a simple HOLIDAY table with HOLIDAY_ID and HOLIDAY_DATE columns. – user6621250 Jul 21 '16 at 18:12
1

Something like this works - in plain SQL. If you don't really need to use PL/SQL, you are better off not using it. If you do need to use it, adapt as needed. I see in the comments you already changed the requirement; adapt as you need.

The "magic number" 2 * :wd_number + 5 is there to make sure we add enough calendar dates to include at least :wd_number workdays; the +5 is for low values of :wd_number. This is not the most efficient solution, but it's not wasting more than a few milliseconds so I didn't bother to make it more efficient.

with holidays( holiday_date, holiday_name ) as (
       select date '2016-01-01', 'New Year''s Day'   from dual union all
       select date '2016-04-01', 'April Fools'' Day' from dual union all
       select date '2016-05-01', 'May First'         from dual
     ),
     work_days ( dt ) as (
       select  to_date(:start_date, 'yyyy-mm-dd') + level - 1
         from  dual
         where to_char(to_date(:start_date, 'yyyy-mm-dd') + level - 1, 'Dy') 
                                                                    not in ('Sat', 'Sun')
         connect by level < 2 * to_number(:wd_number) + 5
       minus
       select  holiday_date 
         from  holidays
     ),
     ordered_work_days ( dt, rn ) as (
       select dt, row_number() over (order by dt)
       from   work_days
     )
select dt
from   ordered_work_days
where  rn = to_number(:wd_number)
;
  • Thanks mathguy, i was more curious on what mistake i was making in my own function, finally i figured it out, first in my condition when 'DAY' ='SATURDAY' , there was a spcace in the output of to_char('vStartDate', 'DAY) which is 'SATURDAY ' and there were 3 spaces for 'SUNDAY ', that is why it was ignoring the condition. i replaced it with below code and it is working. – user6621250 Jul 26 '16 at 19:15
  • @user6621250 - right. If you use the 'DAY' format it will return a value in FIXED LENGTH character format, namely the length of the longest day name in the language you use. WEDNESDAY is nine letters, so all other day names will be padded with spaces to fill up nine letters. If you ask me that's a completely idiotic behavior, but I am not Oracle; perhaps they did have some reason. This is why you are better off using 'DY' as I did - compare 'DY' to 'SAT' or 'SUN'. (Note the upper vs lower case too: I used 'Dy' and 'Sat' and 'Sun'). Other than that, plain SQL is almost always better than PL/SQL – mathguy Jul 26 '16 at 20:10
  • Well, that explains everything.. Thank you. – user6621250 Jul 28 '16 at 15:39
0
      create or replace FUNCTION GETNTHWORKINGDATE (pStartDate DATE,
                                          pEndDate DATE,
                                          pWorkDay NUMBER)
 RETURN DATE AS
 vStartDate DATE;
 vWorkDate DATE ;
 vCount NUMBER;
 vHoliday DATE;

BEGIN
vCount := 1; 
vStartDate := pStartDate;  
BEGIN
WHILE (vStartDate < pEndDate)
  LOOP 
      BEGIN
          --Select Holiday Month and Date into vHoliday Variable when Start Date is a holiday.
           SELECT HOLIDAY_DATE INTO vHoliday FROM HOLIDAY WHERE (to_char(HOLIDAY_DATE, 'MM DD') = to_char(vStartDate, 'MM DD'));
           EXCEPTION
           WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN vHoliday := NULL;   
       END;  

    -- Code to eliminate Weekends
    IF (to_char(vStartDate, 'D') = 1 ) OR (to_char(vStartDate, 'D') = 7) THEN
        vCount := vCount;

    --Code to eliminate Holiday's from holiday table.
    ELSIF (to_char(vHoliday, 'MM DD') = to_char(vStartDate, 'MM DD')) THEN
       vCount := vCount;
    ELSE      
       vWorkDate := vStartDate; 
      IF vCount = pWorkDay THEN
        EXIT;
      ELSE  
        vCount := vCount + 1;            
      END IF;
   END IF;
   vStartDate := vStartDate + 1;
   END LOOP;       
  END;

 RETURN vWorkDate;

END GETNTHWORKINGDATE;

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