21

I have socket.io working in app.js but when i am trying to call it from other modules its not creating io.connection not sure ?

app.js

var express = require('express');
var app = express();
var server = require('http').createServer(app);
var io = require('socket.io')(server);
var ditconsumer = require('./app/consumers/ditconsumer');
ditconsumer.start(io);
server.listen(3000, function () {
    console.log('Example app listening on port 3000!');
});

consumer.js

module.exports = {
    start: function (io) {
        consumer.on('message', function (message) {
            logger.log('info', message.value);
            io.on('connection', function (socket) {
                socket.on('message', function(message) {
                    socket.emit('ditConsumer',message.value);
                    console.log('from console',message.value);
                });
            });
        });
}
}
37

Since app.js is usually kind of the main initialization module in your app, it will typically both initialize the web server and socket.io and will load other things that are needed by the app.

As such a typical way to share io with other modules is by passing them to the other modules in that module's constructor function. That would work like this:

var server = require('http').createServer(app);
var io = require('socket.io')(server);

// load consumer.js and pass it the socket.io object
require('./consumer.js)(io);

// other app.js code follows

Then, in consumer.js:

// define constructor function that gets `io` send to it
module.exports = function(io) {
    io.on('connection', function(socket) {
        socket.on('message', function(message) {
            logger.log('info',message.value);
            socket.emit('ditConsumer',message.value);
            console.log('from console',message.value);
        });
    });
};

Or, if you want to use a .start() method to initialize things, you can do the same thing with that (minor differences):

// app.js
var server = require('http').createServer(app);
var io = require('socket.io')(server);

// load consumer.js and pass it the socket.io object
var consumer = require('./consumer.js);
consumer.start(io);

// other app.js code follows

And the start method in consumer.js

// consumer.js
// define start method that gets `io` send to it
module.exports = {
    start: function(io) {
        io.on('connection', function(socket) {
            socket.on('message', function(message) {
                logger.log('info',message.value);
                socket.emit('ditConsumer',message.value);
                console.log('from console',message.value);
            });
        });
    };
}

This is what is known as the "push" module of resource sharing. The module that is loading you pushes some shared info to you by passing it in the constructor.

There are also "pull" models where the module itself calls a method in some other module to retrieve the shared info (in this case the io object).

Often, either model can be made to work, but usually one or the other will feel more natural given how modules are being loaded and who has the desired information and how you intend for modules to be reused in other circumstances.

  • so if i need io object do i need to create io.on connection in every module like you did for consumer.js – hussain Jul 21 '16 at 20:57
  • @hussain - If you are trying to listen for incoming messages from connected sockets, then you need io.on('connection, ...) to get to the connected sockets. There are certainly other ways to architect things where you have one central io.on('connection, ...) and other modules can contribute message listeners, but that's a bigger change in your code and we'd have to understand more about what you're doing to know the best thing to recommend. But, it also no big deal to have multiple io.on('connection, ...) listeners. io is an eventEmitter and is built to have lots of listeners. – jfriend00 Jul 21 '16 at 21:00
  • actually i updated my question code for consumer , i am already exporting Consumer into app.js , is it possible to add module.export function inisde Consumer object ? – hussain Jul 21 '16 at 21:07
  • Yeah.. I forgot about this approach. I actually like this suggestion better than mine. – Patrick Roberts Jul 21 '16 at 21:07
  • @hussain - Your modifications to consumer are perfectly compatible with this general scheme. If you want to keep your start exported method, then just pass io to the start method and get it from there. The point is that you have the app module pass the io object to your consumer module as part of the startup/initialization of the consumer module. But, what you show looks like you can just replace what you have with what I suggested and use a constructor function instead of a start() method - though either can work just fine. – jfriend00 Jul 21 '16 at 21:10
22

If you want to avoid the global scope, make your io exist in a separate file like this:

var sio = require('socket.io');
var io = null;

exports.io = function () {
  return io;
};

exports.initialize = function(server) {
  return io = sio(server);
};

Then in app.js:

var server = require('http').createServer(app);
var io = require('./io').initialize(server);
require('./app/consumers/ditconsumer'); // loading module will cause desired side-effect
server.listen(...);

and in consumer.js:

require('../io').io().on('connection', function(socket) {
  logger.log('info', message.value);
  socket.on('message', function(message) {
    socket.emit('ditConsumer',message.value);
    console.log('from console',message.value);
  });
});
  • i added var socket = require('../index').io() into consumer.js but its throwing error TypeError: require(...).io is not a function – hussain Jul 21 '16 at 19:42
  • Is the new file you added called index.js? – Patrick Roberts Jul 21 '16 at 21:05
  • Does index.js have the code exports.io = function () { return io; };? – Patrick Roberts Jul 21 '16 at 21:08
  • Are you sure the file is located in the correct location relative to consumer.js? – Patrick Roberts Jul 21 '16 at 21:10
  • 2
    This guy, this guy f**ks. #piedPiperReference. Excellent work with this small module mate, helped me out quite a bunch with an exercise I'm doing with this. – Ted Feb 26 '17 at 3:50
2

You can make a singleton instance in just 4 lines.

In websocket.js write your server configuration code.

const socketIO = require('socket.io');
const server = require('http').createServer();
server.listen(8000);

module.exports = socketIO(server);

Then in your consumer.js just require the file

const socket = require('./websocket');

/* API logic here */

socket.emit('userRegistered', `${user.name} has registered.`);
1

I found simple solution The solution is quite simple. Use global variable in app.js and access it from other files.

global.io = require('socket.io').listen(server);

0

I created a file socket.service.ts with a class SocketService and in app.tsI called the constructor with the http. This will also work with pure javascript, just change the imports and exports ...

import * as socketIo from 'socket.io';

export class SocketService {

  io: any;

  constructor(http) {
    this.io = socketIo(http)
    this.io.set('origins', '*:*');
    this.io.on('connection', function (socket) {
      console.log('an user connected');
      socket.on('disconnect', function () {
        console.log('user disconnected');
      });
    });

    http.listen(3001, function () {
      console.log('socket listening on *:3001');
    });

  }

}

in app.ts call is like:

import * as express from 'express';

import { SocketService } from './services/socket.service';

const app = express(); 
var http = require('http').Server(app);

// ...

new SocketService(http);

// ...

module.exports = app;

Please notice that everytime you call the constructor a new instance will be created. To avoid this use the singleton pattern :)

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