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A noobie Linux learner here.

I created a python script and chmod 700 filename.py, when I was going to using ./filename.py, my instructor came and use ./!$ to run the file.

What does the ./!$ that actually mean? I couldn't google it out. I'd greatly appreciate for a link of cheatsheet for the similar commend too.

Thanks in advance.

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  • Run a command with an arg like file some_file then run !$, put ./ before it and you end up with ./file_name Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 23:14
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    !$ refers to the last argument of the previous command. Since the previous command had only one argument filename.py, it holds that filename. The ./ is part of the path, same as when run as ./filename.py. Basically it was just a shell shortcut of which there are many Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 23:14
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    @Meruemu This question is not on topic at Stack Overflow, and more appropriate at superuser.com. If I put in an answer, it could make it more difficult to migrate or later delete the question. Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 23:21
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    @MichaelBerkowski It also fits here, as it's also a bash language question.
    – xvan
    Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 23:51
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    In bash, ! refers to previous command. In regex $ is an anchor at the end of the line while ^ is an anchor at the beginning of the line. Suppose I edited 5 files vi file1.py file2.py file3.py file4.py file5.py then I ran ./!^ it will be equivalent to ./file1.py but if I run ./!$ it will be equivalent to ./file5.py.
    – alvits
    Commented Jul 22, 2016 at 0:46

2 Answers 2

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Suppose I just ran a command python test.py. This was my last command I entered into the shell. However, its argument was test.py.

Remembering that ./ refers to the current working directory, when I type ./!$ I get the following output:

$ ./!$
./test.py
./test.py: line 1: import: command not found
./test.py: line 2: $'\r': command not found
./test.py: line 3: syntax error near unexpected token `('
'/test.py: line 3: `df = pd.DataFrame([

By context clues my last argument was used as the !$.

If I enter several arguments such as python test.py test2.py I get:

$ ./!$
./test2.py
./test2.py: line 1: import: command not found
Unable to initialize device PRN

Confirming my intuition.

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    for the sake of testing, much better to use echo ./!$
    – Ben Voigt
    Commented Jul 22, 2016 at 0:42
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    for the sake of testing, much better to use ./!$:p.
    – alvits
    Commented Jul 22, 2016 at 1:36
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Fully agree with Michael Berkowski's comment. !$ refers to the last argument from the previous bash command. For instance, if you type echo hello world then !$ would expand to "world".

In your case, the !$ is expanded into "filename.py". The command becomes strictly the same as above: ./filename.py.

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  • Why does it, "!$ refers to the last argument from the previous bash command". Is it !$ kind of black magic? There is no information in the internet about this -- www.google.com/search?q=!%24&
    – osgx
    Commented Jul 22, 2016 at 0:55
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    Google is not good at finding such symbols. Try "bash bang dollar" for instance. For the second part, you can give a look on bash's documentation (gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#Word-Designators).
    – Aif
    Commented Jul 22, 2016 at 0:59
  • @Aif that's why I couldn't find anything on Google about it for a long time. Thanks!
    – Meruemu
    Commented Jul 22, 2016 at 1:02
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    See the bash manual, particularly the section on history expansion and the subsection on word designators. ! is the character used for history substitution in general. $ conventionally refers to the tail end of something. Commented Jul 22, 2016 at 1:36

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