4

Reading this great tutorial about Stack vs Heap, I've got a dubt about this phrase: All memory allocated on the stack is known at compile time.

I mean, if I'm within a for cycle that depends of user input (i from 0 to X), and within the for I allocate memory on the stack (such as create new instances of some classes and put inside a class-container), it can't know how will grow the stack when compile the program (it miss the input from user).

Am I misunderstand somethings?

1
  • You should add code for your hypothetical scenario. I think @DevSolar got it right, but it would be less ambiguous if you supplied the code you're thinking about. – Sebastian Redl Jul 22 '16 at 7:39
4

The statement made is a little bit simplified for the reader. You're right that the stack is dynamic in nature and the actual allocated amount can vary depending on dynamic input. Here is a simple example with a recursive function:

void f(int n)
{
    int x = n * 10;
    if(x == 0) return;

    std::cout << x << std::endl;
    f(n - 1);
}

int main()
{
    int n;
    std::cout << "Enter n: " << std::endl;
    std::cin >> n;
    f(n);
}

Here clearly the number of invocations of f, a recursive function, depends on the n entered by the user, so for any given instantiation the compiler cannot possibly know the exact memory address of the local variable x in f. However, what it does know is x's offset from the local stack frame, which is what I believe the example is referring to. A stack frame is a local area of the stack prepared every time a function invocation occurs. Within a given stack frame, locations of local variables are in fact known constant offsets relative to the beginning of the stack frame. This 'beginning' is saved in a standard register in every invocation, so all the compiler has to do to find the address of any local is to apply its fixed known offset to this dynamic 'base pointer'.

2
  • 3
    So what is known at compile-time is size of each stack frame. But not how many stack frame there will be. Are you saying this? – markzzz Jul 22 '16 at 7:48
  • 3
    Exactly that. The lookups of a variable within a specific stack frame are of the form BP - x, where BP is the register representing the 'base pointer' for that frame (unknown at compile time), and x is a compile-time constant for the variable in question (eg BP - 8). The - sign is there because the stack grows downwards, so away from the base pointer – Smeeheey Jul 22 '16 at 7:52
3

I mean, if I'm within a for cycle that depends of user input (i from 0 to X), and within the for I allocate memory on the stack (such as create new instances of some classes and put inside a class-container), it can't know how will grow the stack when compile the program (it miss the input from user).

So you have a class container...

std::vector< SomeClass > vec;

...that's on the stack. Inside a loop you create a new instance of some class...

for ( size_t i = 0; i < X; ++i )
{
    SomeClass x;

...which is on the stack. When you put that into the container...

    vec.push_back( x );
}

...that container will store the instance on the heap.

You only ever have one SomeClass on the stack, and that fact is known at compile time. The stack doesn't grow beyond that one instance.

There are ways to grow the stack at runtime though (e.g. alloca()), so the generic statement made by the tutorial is not quite correct.

6
  • But at every iteration, SomeClass x is created. If I have X=20, 20 different class are created in the memory. Aren't they? – markzzz Jul 22 '16 at 7:36
  • 1
    @paizza: Each instance gets destroyed at the end of its loop (as it goes out of scope). In the second iteration, you cannot access the x from the first iteration anymore. What you stored in the container is a copy of x, and it resides on the heap. – DevSolar Jul 22 '16 at 7:37
  • @paizza: Also note that I am only talking about the stack frame of the current function. Check Smeeheey's answer for quite correct statements of the overall stack memory usage. – DevSolar Jul 22 '16 at 7:43
  • now sure if SomeClass x; goes into the stack. Isn't equal to SomeClass x = new Someclass? It goes to the heap... – markzzz Jul 22 '16 at 12:14
  • 2
    @paizza: You would have to write SomeClass * x = new SomeClass; -- you would have a pointer (on the stack) to an instance (on the heap). The pointer would go out of scope at the end of the loop, like any other stack object declared inside the loop; the heap object would persist. – DevSolar Jul 22 '16 at 12:18
1

In the considering case STACK means memory allocated by compiler for local variables defined within your method. "You allocate" (in quotes, because it is done for you) this memory when define variable like:

void myMethod(int x)
{
    int y;
    for (y = 0; y < 10; y++)
    {
       int z = x + y;
    }
}

All x, y and z in this example are local variables allocated in the stack.

When you create some instances with new operator, you allocate memory in heap (and here YOU ALLOCATE without quotes), but to store address of this allocated memory you will likely use pointer variable allocated in the stack:

int * p = new int[10];

Now p is local variable (stored in stack) that stores address of memory allocated in heap for array of 10 integers.

While compiler parse your source code it made set of instructions (in terms of particular processor) for calling of your method and in this time it calculate size of memory needed for all local variables and at the program execution time memory will be allocated in the stack (and data will be moved in some of them, e.g. x in my example will be initialized with data given in method call instruction) before method starts (after method completed all memory will be released, i.e. stack will be freed data used during method execution "will be lost").

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.