32

I have [3, 16, 120]. when I do [3, 16, 120].map(mapper), I want to achieve, for example [4,5, 17,18, 121,122] i.e. each element map to n+1 and n+2. This is of course an example - what I want is to simply push multiple values from mapper function

Do I have to use Array.each and push to an array, or is it possible to do it with Array.map (or other built-in api)

  • You could probably use Array.reduce, though I'm not sure it would be any better than using Array.forEach. – jcaron Jul 22 '16 at 14:11

10 Answers 10

35

You can use reduce() and add to array e+1, e+2 of each element.

var ar = [3, 16, 120];

var result = ar.reduce(function(r, e) {
  r.push(e+1, e+2);
  return r;
}, []);

console.log(result)

This is ES6 version with arrow function

var ar = [3, 16, 120];

var result = ar.reduce((r, e) => r.push(e+1, e+2) && r, []);
console.log(result)

PS: Array.push seems to be faster and has no Maximum call stack.. error, see below:

a = Array(1000000).fill(1); st = Date.now(); Array.prototype.concat.apply([], a.map(function (n) { return [n+1, n+2]; })); console.log(`${Date.now() - st}ms `);
> RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded

a = Array(1000000).fill(1); st = Date.now(); a.reduce((r, e) => r.push(e+1, e+2) && r, []); console.log(`${Date.now() - st}ms `);
> 180ms

So .push is preferable comparing to accepted solution.

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  • 2
    You're modifying r in the callback, which means this is just an unnecessarily complicated for loop. – melpomene Jul 22 '16 at 14:13
  • I just added performance test to answer, and it seems to be .push is preferable comparing to .concat in this case. Also concat will throw Maximum call stack exception for big arrays – Kostanos Dec 6 '17 at 3:54
19

I come up with one myself, using spread operator.

[].concat(...[3, 16, 120].map(x => [x+1, x+2]))

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11

Not particularly nice, but it is a possible solution:

var arr = [3, 16, 120];

console.log([].concat.apply([], arr.map(function (n) { return [n+1, n+2]; })));

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  • you should consider using Array.prototype.concat instead of [].concat. Its shorter but you are allocating a new array everytime this runs – eltonkamami Jul 22 '16 at 14:34
  • 1
    @eltonkamami I'm already allocating n+3 arrays anyway. n+4 isn't going to make things much worse. – melpomene Jul 22 '16 at 14:36
4

you could produce an array for each items, then concat all these arrays :

[3, 16, 120].map(x => [x+1, x+2] ).reduce( (acc,val) => acc.concat(val), []);
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  • Nice but it does 2 passes of the array and doubled array – Boyang Jul 22 '16 at 14:28
  • Yes I think @Nenad Vracar solution is better than mine – Olivier Boissé Jul 22 '16 at 14:31
4

You could use Array#reduce in combination with Array#concat.

console.log([3, 16, 120].reduce(function (r, a) {
    return r.concat(a + 1, a + 2);
}, []));

ES6

console.log([3, 16, 120].reduce((r, a) => r.concat(a + 1, a + 2), []));

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3

Immutable solution, with the spread operator:

[3, 16, 120].reduce((a, v) => [...a, v+1, v+2], [])
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2

using Array#concat and Array#map

Array.prototype.concat.apply([], [3, 16, 120].map(x => [x+1, x+2] ));
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2

Just for fun, an ES6 solution with a generator:

var arr = [3, 16, 120];

var [...result] = (function*() { for( i of arr){ yield ++i; yield ++i; }})();

console.log(result);

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  • I never know this can work... 1. generator can be expanded with spread operator (well, it's iterable) 2. spread operator is slower than assignment Good one! – Boyang Jul 22 '16 at 15:47
1

Using Array.prototype.flat():

const doubled = [3, 16, 120].map(item => [item + 1, item + 2]).flat();

console.log(doubled)

Fair warning – not a standard method to this date (posted 12/2018).

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1

2019 Update

Use Array.prototype.flatMap(), introduced in ES10.

const oddNumbers = [1, 3, 5, 7, 9];
const allNumbers = oddNumbers.flatMap((number) => [number, number + 1]);
console.log(allNumbers); // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
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