20

Every if...else if example I’ve seen includes a final else clause:

if (condition1) {
  doA();
} else if (condition2) {
  doB();
} else if (condition3) {
  doC();
} else {
  noConditionsMet();
}
alwaysDoThis();

I understand that this is basically syntactic sugar for nested if...else statements:

if (condition1) {
  doA();
} else {
  if (condition2) {
    doB();
  } else {
    if (condition3) {
      doC();
    } else {
      noConditionsMet();
    }
  }
}
alwaysDoThis();

I have never seen any examples of an if...else if that omits the last else clause. But seeing as plain if statements (without else clauses) are valid, and going by the equivalent “nested statements” above, my gut tells me that this is okay to do:

if (condition1) {
  doA();
} else if (condition2) {
  doB();
} else if (condition3) {
  doC();
}
alwaysDoThis();

Can someone point me to a resource or example that explicitly says whether or not it’s valid?

And on another level, if it is valid, would it be recommended or is it considered “bad practice”?

  • Flow control exists for you to decide how to control the flow. Naturally, you can find out if it's "valid" by running the code and seeing it execute. – user1106925 Jul 22 '16 at 23:26
  • It depends on the context. You should always consider the else case, but often you don't need to handle it explicitly. However, I think the likelihood for the necessity increases with the number of cases. That conforms to your claim that it is unusual to omit the else clause in bigger conditional cascades. – Michael Hoff Jul 22 '16 at 23:32
  • Thanks for the edit on my answer; I learned a new word. – user4815162342 Aug 27 '18 at 16:16
15

The ending else is not mandatory. As for whether it is needed, it depends on what you want to achieve.

The trailing else clause will execute when none of the specified conditions is true. If the conditions are guaranteed to be collectively exhaustive, then an else clause is entirely superfluous, except possibly to contain an assertion that catches the "impossible" condition. In your case, whether you need an else clause depends on whether you want specific code to run if and only if neither of condition1, condition2, and condition3 are true.

else can be omitted for any if statement, there is nothing special in the last if of an if/else if chain. This is documented in any JavaScript grammar, e.g. in the specification.

| improve this answer | |
  • no problem! I understood what you meant, but i wanted to correct the record. You were right that your conditions should be mutually exclusive, for good coding (even though it's not mandatory). But whether the final else clause would ever run doesn’t require your conditions to be mutually exclusive; it requires them to be collectively exhaustive. Look up the MECE Principle to learn more. – chharvey Aug 27 '18 at 16:21
  • @chharvey Yes, collectively exhaustive fits exactly what I wanted to communicate - if I'd known the term, I would have used it. Using "mutually exclusive" in its place sort of works because it's a stronger criterion so it doesn't invalidate the rest of the sentence - but collectively exhaustive covers it without being either too strict or too permissive. – user4815162342 Aug 27 '18 at 16:38
10

You never need an else clause. (It's hard to offer examples of something that is not necessary, so I'll leave it at that.)

edit as a comment notes, square brackets in language syntax notation usually indicate that something is optional.

| improve this answer | |
  • That's what I figured, but I haven't seen any official documentation. Even MDN's docs always have a final else clause. – chharvey Jul 22 '16 at 23:28
  • 2
    However, note that this does not extend to the ternary conditional operator: a ? b : c can never become just a ? b (but a && b has the semantics you'd expect from it). – Amadan Jul 22 '16 at 23:29
  • @chharvey: From the docs you linked: "statement2 Statement that is executed if condition evaluates to false and the else clause exists." They're telling you that the else clause may not exist. Also the syntax shows square brackets around [else statement2], which generally indicates something optional. – user1106925 Jul 22 '16 at 23:34
  • Yes I saw the square brackets and I know the else in a plain if statement is optional; I was just looking to confirm that it was also optional in an if..else if statement. – chharvey Jul 22 '16 at 23:44
  • 1
    @chharvey: JavaScript doesn't have an else if statement. This is also noted a couple times in the docs you linked. It only has if (expression) statement else statement. Because an if statement is a statement (obviously), you can use it after else, just like any other statement, like for or empty ; or switch or any arbitrary expression statement. – user1106925 Jul 22 '16 at 23:46
9

It is 100% valid. No, it is not bad practice. If you don't need it, don't write it.

Take the following for example:

function doStuff(data) {
    if (data.something) {
        // go format the data in some way
    }
    else if (data.somethingElse) {
        // go format the data in some other way
    }
    // must be formatted correctly, don't do anything else
    ...
}
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  • Thanks, man! I was thinking I am doing something wrong by not adding the last else. – p01ymath Jun 16 '18 at 14:09
2

No need for a else block, they are not if else statement but if statements. Consider else, elseif as an extension.

Here's a link to a sitepoint thread : click this. And a similar thread on stackoverflow : click here

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  • thank you, but even though the principles are the same, this question is about Javascript, not PHP – chharvey Jul 22 '16 at 23:39
  • oups, wrong section ;) – Ivan Jul 22 '16 at 23:42

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