1053

I am getting the error Maximum request length exceeded when I am trying to upload a video in my site.

How do I fix this?

14 Answers 14

1981
3

If you are using IIS for hosting your application, then the default upload file size is 4MB. To increase it, please use this below section in your web.config -

<configuration>
    <system.web>
        <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1048576" />
    </system.web>
</configuration>

For IIS7 and above, you also need to add the lines below:

 <system.webServer>
   <security>
      <requestFiltering>
         <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1073741824" />
      </requestFiltering>
   </security>
 </system.webServer>

Note:

  • maxRequestLength is measured in kilobytes
  • maxAllowedContentLength is measured in bytes

which is why the values differ in this config example. (Both are equivalent to 1 GB.)

| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    Thank you sachin and i added some thing like <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="32768" executionTimeout="180" /> – Surya sasidhar Oct 4 '10 at 9:04
  • 11
    maxAllowedContentLength must be in bytes, not kilobytes, so the examples provided are not equivalent. – Matthew Sharpe May 18 '12 at 16:13
  • 33
    With both IIS 7.5 and VS RC 2012 IIS Express I had to set BOTH of these. The httpRuntime one configures ASP.NET's max length while requestLimits configures IIS's max length, stackoverflow.com/questions/6327452/… and forums.iis.net/t/1169846.aspx – Despertar Aug 6 '12 at 8:21
  • 19
    It's worth pointing out, again, that the maxAllowedContentLength is in bytes, not kilobytes. The two values should not be the same number, because they are not the same measurement unit. – Pandincus Oct 10 '12 at 18:59
  • 13
    Make sure that you're adding this setting to the main Web.config instead of the one inside the Views folder – Serj Sagan Mar 4 '13 at 15:29
553
0

I don't think it's been mentioned here, but to get this working, I had to supply both of these values in the web.config:

In system.web

<httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1048576" executionTimeout="3600" />

And in system.webServer

<security>
    <requestFiltering>
        <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1073741824" />
    </requestFiltering>
</security>

IMPORTANT : Both of these values must match. In this case, my max upload is 1024 megabytes.

maxRequestLength has 1048576 KILOBYTES, and maxAllowedContentLength has 1073741824 BYTES.

I know it's obvious, but it's easy to overlook.

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    To any it may concern: This answer also works perfectly for IIS-Express (asp.net-webpages with WebMatrix) – VoidKing Mar 1 '13 at 21:36
  • 5
    Yes, this is answer that worked for me instead of Sachin's answer. It works on Azure too. – Gautam Jain Mar 21 '13 at 10:00
  • 5
    This is definitely the correct answer... both entries must be present. In case of MVC 3, it can be in the project root web.config file. – Miguel Angelo Jun 3 '13 at 22:05
  • 2
    another important thing is the 'executionTimeout' which Karl mentions – Muhammad Amin Aug 20 '13 at 14:22
  • 26
    I had to combine this with an existing line for: <httpRuntime targetFramework="4.5" maxRequestLength="1048576" executionTimeout="3600" /> – Ken Mc Nov 20 '13 at 0:53
196
0

It may be worth noting that you may want to limit this change to the URL you expect to be used for the upload rather then your entire site.

<location path="Documents/Upload">
  <system.web>
    <!-- 50MB in kilobytes, default is 4096 or 4MB-->
    <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="51200" />
  </system.web>
  <system.webServer>
    <security>
      <requestFiltering>
        <!-- 50MB in bytes, default is 30000000 or approx. 28.6102 Mb-->
        <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="52428800" /> 
      </requestFiltering>
    </security>
  </system.webServer>
</location>
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice Solution thinking about the location. But is there a location path when working with MVC (and therefore working with routes)? – Luuk Krijnen Aug 6 '14 at 14:02
  • 1
    It would be a URL corresponding to the route that you have your upload action set to. In my case, I have a Documents controller with an action called Upload that I post the form to. In your case it would be whatever the url to your action would be. – Nick Albrecht Aug 6 '14 at 16:17
  • For anyone who likes this answer, see this. – DontVoteMeDown Jan 7 '15 at 11:44
  • 2
    Dude you rock. Sorry, but my tiny little up vote wasn't enough. – Nicholas Petersen Oct 29 '17 at 5:24
  • 1
    This will work with WebAPI for up to and including MVC v5. Once you hit ASP.NET Core with MVC Core, then there are different options you should set for Kestrel. – Nick Albrecht Sep 5 '18 at 1:03
44
0

And just in case someone's looking for a way to handle this exception and show a meaningful explanation to the user (something like "You're uploading a file that is too big"):

//Global.asax
private void Application_Error(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var ex = Server.GetLastError();
    var httpException = ex as HttpException ?? ex.InnerException as HttpException;
    if(httpException == null) return;

    if (((System.Web.HttpException)httpException.InnerException).WebEventCode == System.Web.Management.WebEventCodes.RuntimeErrorPostTooLarge)
    {
        //handle the error
        Response.Write("Too big a file, dude"); //for example
    }
}

(ASP.NET 4 or later required)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    maxAllowedContentLength should be higher than (maxRequestLength * 1024) for the exception generation. – Der_Meister Jan 19 '16 at 4:50
  • This post gave me what I needed to warn the user but HttpContext.Current.ClearError() was needed to allow the Response.Redirect() to work properly. In terms of web.config it works just with the maxRequestLength attribute of httpRuntime. – nrod Nov 28 '18 at 17:12
  • File size validation and user-friendly message can be done via JS at the page level using an onchange event on the upload button and comparing the upload file size with the max upload limit. – Alfred Wallace Mar 28 '19 at 3:22
29
0

The maximum request size is, by default, 4MB (4096 KB)

This is explained here.

The above article also explains how to fix this issue :)

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    The link is redirecting me to the microsoft support homepage – Bishop Oct 13 '15 at 16:17
  • 1
    Maybe something was wrong. The link redirects here – gofr1 Jul 7 '16 at 5:18
22
0

If you can't update configuration files but control the code that handles file uploads use HttpContext.Current.Request.GetBufferlessInputStream(true).

The true value for disableMaxRequestLength parameter tells the framework to ignore configured request limits.

For detailed description visit https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh195568(v=vs.110).aspx

| improve this answer | |
  • AWESOME, so how does the top answer have > 1600 votes, and this only 5? This is terrific, because so often, it's just a single action we want this on. Further, no messing with other settings, etc. – Nicholas Petersen Jun 1 '18 at 16:39
  • This is what I was looking for. – Chris Catignani Jul 5 '18 at 18:02
20
0

There's an element in web.config to configure the max size of the uploaded file:

<httpRuntime 
    maxRequestLength="1048576"
  />
| improve this answer | |
11
0

To summarize all the answers in a single place:

<system.web>
  <httpRuntime targetFramework="4.5.2" maxRequestLength="1048576"/>
</system.web>

<system.webServer>
  <security>
    <requestFiltering>
      <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1073741824" />
    </requestFiltering>
  </security>
</system.webServer>

Rules:

  • maxRequestLength (expressed in kb) value must match maxAllowedContentLength (expressed in bytes).
  • most of the time your system.web section may already contains an "httpRuntime". set your targetFramework to the version of your .net used.

Notes:

  • default value for maxRequestLength is 4096 (4mb). max value is 2,147,483,647
  • default value for maxAllowedContentLength is 30,000,000 (around 30mb). max value is 4,294,967,295

more info MSDN

| improve this answer | |
8
0

maxRequestLength (length in KB) Here as ex. I took 1024 (1MB) maxAllowedContentLength (length in Bytes) should be same as your maxRequestLength (1048576 bytes = 1MB).

<system.web>
   <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1024" executionTimeout="3600" />
</system.web>

<system.webServer>
   <security>
      <requestFiltering>
          <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1048576"/>
      </requestFiltering>
   </security>
</system.webServer>
| improve this answer | |
6
0

It bothered me for days too. I modified the Web.config file but it didn't work. It turned out that there are two Web.config file in my project, and I should modified the one in the ROOT directory, not the others. Hope this would be helpful.

| improve this answer | |
5
0

If you have a request going to an application in the site, make sure you set maxRequestLength in the root web.config. The maxRequestLength in the applications's web.config appears to be ignored.

| improve this answer | |
  • If I could upvote this more than once I would. This wasted a day of my life. If you have a virtual dir sub-application, you have to put the httpRuntime maxRequestLength="### and requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength in a web config at the root level, not at the sub-app level. – nickvans Feb 8 '17 at 14:03
1
0

I was tripped up by the fact that our web.config file has multiple system.web sections: it worked when I added < httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1048576" /> to the system.web section that at the configuration level.

| improve this answer | |
1
0

I had to edit the C:\Windows\System32\inetsrv\config\applicationHost.config file and add <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1073741824" /> to the end of the...

<configuration>
    <system.webServer>
        <security>
            <requestFiltering>

section.

As per This Microsoft Support Article

| improve this answer | |
  • web.config from your own project should override these, so I don't see the need to modify applicationHost.config. – bvgheluwe Nov 27 '19 at 10:40
-3
0

I can add to config web uncompiled

<system.web> 
  <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1024" executionTimeout="3600" /> 
  <compilation debug="true"/> 
</system.web> 
<security> 
  <requestFiltering> 
    <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1048576"/> 
  </requestFiltering> 
</security>
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The executionTimeout attribute has nothing to do with what is asked, and neither does the compilation tag. – Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Aug 9 '16 at 14:24

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