2

I was learning C and playing a bit with heap memory when I encountered this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) {
    char* test = malloc(1024);
    test = "Hello!";
    printf("%s\n", test);
    free(test);
    return 0;
}

What I think it should do:

  • Allocate 1024 bytes on the heap
  • Write "Hello!\0" to the start of that memory
  • Write to stdout from the start of the pointer I got from malloc() till it finds a \0
  • Free the 1024 bytes of memory allocated with malloc()
  • Return 0

But, my program just crashes when free() is called. Why?

~$ ./mem                                                                                                                                                              
Hello!
*** Error in `./mem': munmap_chunk(): invalid pointer: 0x0000000000400684 ***
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(+0x77725)[0x7f9f99ac5725]
/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(cfree+0x1a8)[0x7f9f99ad1c18]
./mem[0x4005ec]
/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xf0)[0x7f9f99a6e830]
./mem[0x4004e9]
======= Memory map: ========
00400000-00401000 r-xp 00000000 08:01 3801151                            /home/gala/mem
00600000-00601000 r--p 00000000 08:01 3801151                            /home/gala/mem
00601000-00602000 rw-p 00001000 08:01 3801151                            /home/gala/mem
015e6000-01607000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0                                  [heap]
7f9f99838000-7f9f9984e000 r-xp 00000000 08:01 1970703                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7f9f9984e000-7f9f99a4d000 ---p 00016000 08:01 1970703                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7f9f99a4d000-7f9f99a4e000 rw-p 00015000 08:01 1970703                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgcc_s.so.1
7f9f99a4e000-7f9f99c0e000 r-xp 00000000 08:01 1970665                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.23.so
7f9f99c0e000-7f9f99e0d000 ---p 001c0000 08:01 1970665                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.23.so
7f9f99e0d000-7f9f99e11000 r--p 001bf000 08:01 1970665                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.23.so
7f9f99e11000-7f9f99e13000 rw-p 001c3000 08:01 1970665                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.23.so
7f9f99e13000-7f9f99e17000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
7f9f99e17000-7f9f99e3d000 r-xp 00000000 08:01 1970637                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.23.so
7f9f9a013000-7f9f9a016000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
7f9f9a039000-7f9f9a03c000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
7f9f9a03c000-7f9f9a03d000 r--p 00025000 08:01 1970637                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.23.so
7f9f9a03d000-7f9f9a03e000 rw-p 00026000 08:01 1970637                    /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.23.so
7f9f9a03e000-7f9f9a03f000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
7ffcc81cb000-7ffcc81ec000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0                          [stack]
7ffcc81f8000-7ffcc81fa000 r--p 00000000 00:00 0                          [vvar]
7ffcc81fa000-7ffcc81fc000 r-xp 00000000 00:00 0                          [vdso]
ffffffffff600000-ffffffffff601000 r-xp 00000000 00:00 0                  [vsyscall]
[1]    12941 abort      ./mem
  • 5
    test = "Hello!"; is wrong, it does not write to allocated memory, but throws away your pointer and overwrites it by pointer to string "Hello!" – Markus Laire Jul 23 '16 at 18:52
  • char* test = strdup("Hello"); – AnatolyS Jul 23 '16 at 18:55
  • @jpw - strncpy would be slightly better – Ed Heal Jul 23 '16 at 18:59
  • @EdHeal: No, strncpy would not be better than strcpy. – Keith Thompson Jul 23 '16 at 19:06
  • 1
    In addition to the information given in the comments and answers, you should confirm that malloc succeeded before copying data to the allocated memory. malloc returns NULL on failure. – Keith Thompson Jul 23 '16 at 19:06
3

As in the comments, this is what going on:

int main(void) {
    char* test = malloc(1024);     /* You allocate, great! */
    test = "Hello!";               /* Huh, what's this? You point 'test' 
                                    * to some area in the code section.
                                    * Valid, but considering you just 
                                    * allocated some memory, strange */
    printf("%s\n", test);          /* Print out a string from the code
                                    * section: fine. */
    free(test);                    /* What?! You want to try to free() the
                                    * memory in the code section? That's a 
                                    * big no-no! */
    return 0;                      /* whatever */
}

Now, what you should do:

int main(void) {
    char* test = malloc(1024);     /* You allocate, great! */
    strcpy(test, "Hello!");        /* Copy some data into that 
                                    * allocated memory */
    printf("%s\n", test);          /* Print out a string from the
                                    * heap: fine. */
    free(test);                    /* Free that allocated memory! */
    return 0;                      /* aaaand, we're done */
}
  • You want 7, not 6. – amalloy Jul 23 '16 at 19:02
  • You would have to take care of nul terminator after strncpy, just for safety. – ameyCU Jul 23 '16 at 19:02
  • Nice! Where is the string "Hello!" passed to strncpy() being stored? The stack as a local variable? Is it discarded right after the call? – Gala Jul 23 '16 at 19:03
  • Updated my answer. – Bart Friederichs Jul 23 '16 at 19:03
  • 1
    @Gala, the heap is not very useful for static strings that never change, but it is useful for data that does change, or for large pieces of data (otherwise stack might overflow and other nasty stuff) – Bart Friederichs Jul 23 '16 at 19:08
3

Welcome to the complex world of C!

Basically, you're overwriting your pointer test with an address of "Hello!" (which is static immutable array).

And it crashes because you try to free a thing that you have not created.

You should use strcpy() or a loop to copy your string into text.

  • For historical reasons, C string literals are not const. "Hello!" is of type char[7], not const char[7]. But attempting to modify a string literal has undefined behavior. – Keith Thompson Jul 23 '16 at 19:07
  • @KeithThompson Thanks, I've not expected that. Edited. – HolyBlackCat Jul 23 '16 at 19:34
1

test is initially pointing to memory allocated by malloc of size 1024. Now in the next line you are pointing test to memory referenced by "Hello!". So your test pointer is now pointing to "Hello!" and not what you allocated in the first place using malloc. Now you are trying to free "Hello!", which is invalid because this memory is not been allocated using malloc and hence your programming is crashing.

char* test = malloc(1024);
test = "Hello!"; /* This is wrong. You pointer is pointing to "Hello!" string base address */

To store "Hello!" in memory allocated by test, you need to use memcpy. so instead of :

test = "Hello!"

use :

memcpy(test, "Hello!", sizeof("Hello!");

This will fix your code.

  • What is the point of using memcpy rather than strcpy? – Keith Thompson Jul 23 '16 at 19:05
  • strcpy terminates when it encounters null char, memcpy will copy exact bytes specified in last parameter for you irrespective whether the source is null terminated or not. Either of them will work for you in this cases. But try to develop habit of either using "strncpy and not strcpy" or memcpy. But provided that strncpy is specific for string I would rather say to use memcpy. – rj99999 Jul 23 '16 at 19:12
  • In this case, memcpy(test, "Hello!", sizeof("Hello!"); does exactly the same thing as strcpy(test, "Hello!"); -- except that you have to specify the source string twice, which is error-prone. strncpy is dangerous when not used very carefully; it's not really a string function (see the article I've linked to in other comments). – Keith Thompson Jul 23 '16 at 19:59

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