1

If I pass a context in the constructor of an object, could that potentially cause a memory leak if the object being created is a long lived object or a singleton. Example below.

public class MyObject{
    private final Context context;

    public MyObject(Context context){
        this.context=context;
    } 
}

Would it be preferable to set the context from getApplicationContext() as that returns a singleton of the application class as opposed to the context from the instance of the referencing class like so?

context =  context.getApplicationContext();  
5

If I pass a context in the constructor of an object, could that potentially cause a memory leak if the object being created is a long lived object or a singleton

Yes. For example, if that Context is an Activity, once the Activity is destroyed, ordinarily it would get garbage-collected. But, if you have a reference to it from a static field, it cannot be garbage-collected. Unless you update the field, you will leak the Activity and everything that it references.

Would it be preferable to set the context from getApplicationContext()

Yes. The Application context is a singleton, as you note, one that lives for the duration of your process. In effect, it is "pre-leaked". You cannot leak it further by having another static field point to it.

2

Yes

On Android, a Context is used for many operations but mostly to load and access resources. This is why all the widgets receive a Context parameter in their constructor. In a regular Android application, you usually have two kinds of Context, Activity and Application. It's usually the first one that the developer passes to classes and methods that need a Context:

This means that views have a reference to the entire activity and therefore to anything your activity is holding onto; usually the entire View hierarchy and all its resources. Therefore, if you leak the Context ("leak" meaning you keep a reference to it thus preventing the GC from collecting it), you leak a lot of memory. Leaking an entire activity can be really easy if you're not careful.

Additional common android bad practices here

1

Yes i think this is good., I have used context globally like this

public class AppApplication extends Application {
    private static AppApplication instance;

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        instance = this;
    }

    public static AppApplication getInstance() {
        return instance;
    }

    public Context getContext() {
        return this;
    }
}

and whenever i have to use simply get context like this..

AppApplication.getInstance().getContext();

don't forget to Add this in your manifest file.

<application
    android:name="yourpackage_name.AppApplication">
    ...
    <activity/>
    ...
    ...
</application>

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