Also how do LEFT JOIN, RIGHT JOIN and FULL JOIN fit in?

  • 42
    Of the answers & comments & their references below only one actually explains how Venn diagrams represent the operators: The circle intersection area represents the set of rows in A JOIN B. The area unique to each circle represents the set of rows you get by taking its table's rows that don't participate in A JOIN B and adding the columns unique to the other table all set to NULL. (And most give a vague bogus correspondence of the circles to A and B.) – philipxy Oct 18 '14 at 20:24
  • A lot of answers are already provided but I have not seen this tutorial mentioned. If you know Venn diagrams, this is a GREAT tutorial: blog.codinghorror.com/a-visual-explanation-of-sql-joins For me, it's concise enough to be a quick read but still grasps the entire concept and works all the cases very well. If you don't know what Venn diagrams are - learn them.Takes 5-10 minutes to do so and will help whenever you need to visualize working with sets and managing operations on sets. – DanteTheSmith May 9 '17 at 9:04
  • 8
    @DanteTheSmith No, that suffers from the same problems as the diagrams here. See my comment above re the question & below re that very blog post: "Jeff repudiates his blog a few pages down in the comments". Venn diagrams show elements in sets. Just try to identify exactly what the sets are and what the elements are in these diagrams. The sets aren't the tables and the elements aren't their rows. Also any two tables can be joined, so PKs & FKs are irrelvant. All bogus. You are doing just what thousands of others have done--got a vague impression you (wrongly) assume makes sense. – philipxy May 18 '17 at 5:57
  • Could someone answer this in reference to Time Series indexed data - Inner and Outer joins do often not work in a human/Venn sense when it comes to time-stamps which are different by mere milliseconds. – yeliabsalohcin Sep 5 '17 at 9:26
  • @yeliabsalohcin Read my comments on this page (and my answer). If there are no duplicate rows then Venn diagrams illustrate the difference between outer & innter joins, so they illustrate outer joins in terms of inner joins & vice versa if you know what they do. But Venn diagrams don't illustrate what either outer join or inner join return in terms of their inputs except when the inputs have no duplicate rows and have the same columns. (If you have a different question, post it as a question. Applications don't matter. "Matching" matters, which depend on data types & modes.) – philipxy Sep 7 '17 at 9:02

31 Answers 31

up vote 5518 down vote accepted

Assuming you're joining on columns with no duplicates, which is a very common case:

  • An inner join of A and B gives the result of A intersect B, i.e. the inner part of a Venn diagram intersection.

  • An outer join of A and B gives the results of A union B, i.e. the outer parts of a Venn diagram union.

Examples

Suppose you have two tables, with a single column each, and data as follows:

A    B
-    -
1    3
2    4
3    5
4    6

Note that (1,2) are unique to A, (3,4) are common, and (5,6) are unique to B.

Inner join

An inner join using either of the equivalent queries gives the intersection of the two tables, i.e. the two rows they have in common.

select * from a INNER JOIN b on a.a = b.b;
select a.*, b.*  from a,b where a.a = b.b;

a | b
--+--
3 | 3
4 | 4

Left outer join

A left outer join will give all rows in A, plus any common rows in B.

select * from a LEFT OUTER JOIN b on a.a = b.b;
select a.*, b.*  from a,b where a.a = b.b(+);

a |  b
--+-----
1 | null
2 | null
3 |    3
4 |    4

Right outer join

A right outer join will give all rows in B, plus any common rows in A.

select * from a RIGHT OUTER JOIN b on a.a = b.b;
select a.*, b.*  from a,b where a.a(+) = b.b;

a    |  b
-----+----
3    |  3
4    |  4
null |  5
null |  6

Full outer join

A full outer join will give you the union of A and B, i.e. all the rows in A and all the rows in B. If something in A doesn't have a corresponding datum in B, then the B portion is null, and vice versa.

select * from a FULL OUTER JOIN b on a.a = b.b;

 a   |  b
-----+-----
   1 | null
   2 | null
   3 |    3
   4 |    4
null |    6
null |    5
  • 29
    It would be good to augment the example by adding another row in table B with value 4. This will show that inner joins need not be on equal no of rows. – softveda Aug 30 '09 at 12:59
  • 425
    An excellent explanation, however this statement: An outer join of A and B gives the results of A union B, i.e. the outer parts of a venn diagram union. isn't phrased accurately. An outer join will give the results of A intersect B in addition to one of the following: all of A (left join), all of B (right join) or all of A and all of B (full join). Only this last scenario is really A union B. Still, a well written explanation. – Thomas May 3 '11 at 19:57
  • 5
    Pro answer! Liked it. Btw: I still can't find the difference betweek LEFT JOIN and LEFT OUTER JOIN, etc. . If this is not part of the question I can post a new one :) – YvesR Apr 17 '12 at 18:53
  • 5
    Am I right that FULL JOIN is an alias of FULL OUTER JOIN and LEFT JOIN is an alias of LEFT OUTER JOIN ? – Damian Jan 1 '13 at 20:29
  • 5
    @Ameer, Thanks. Join does not guarantee an order, you would need to add an ORDER BY clause. – Mark Harrison Mar 5 '13 at 0:28

Also you can consider the following schema for different join types;

visual explanation of joins

Source: Visual-Representation-of-SQL-Joins explained in detail by C.L. Moffatt

  • 66
    Note: There's no FULL OUTER JOIN in MySQL. stackoverflow.com/questions/12473210/… – Michael Ozeryansky Mar 25 '14 at 2:25
  • 7
    I think this diagram assumes that there are no duplicate Key, meaning Key is unique. If Key wasn't unique, I think the result would have been a cross and the return count would be much higher than the size of A. – AlikElzin-kilaka Dec 30 '14 at 9:21
  • In the FULL OUTER JOIN example with the intersection portion excluded, won't using 'A.Key IS NULL' exclude all rows from A because if the Key is NULL then by definition the row doesn't exist? I'm not seeing how that mechanism achieves the results for the VENN diagram shown. – Kelly S. French Jun 28 '16 at 19:27
  • 2
    @KellyS.French See my comments on the question & other answers explaining how to read the Venn diagrams. The zones do not enclose rows from tables A & B. They enclose certain rows made from pairing a row from A and a row from B. Which also aren't even rows of the output of the SELECT statement. The Venn diagram answers are all poor. – philipxy Aug 20 '16 at 15:04
  • A represents all potential rows coming from tableA, B represents all potential rows coming from tableB. The red zones in the diagram mark which of these rows will actually be included in the result set. Note that there could be (and often are) many, many more potential rows coming from a table than there are actually rows in that table. That's because any row in tableA will be potentially occuring once for each row in tableB that references it. This is called the cartesian product. – Stijn de Witt Jul 28 '17 at 18:54

I recommend Jeff's blog article. The best description I've ever seen, plus there is a visualization, e.g.:

Inner Join:

enter image description here

Full Outer Join:

enter image description here

  • 39
    This diagram is a bit misleading for the concept. Read the comments in the post as well. – softveda Aug 30 '09 at 12:56
  • 1
    @ya23: what does you mean by full outer join? – ursitesion Feb 12 '14 at 9:20
  • 11
    Except that Jeff repudiates his blog a few pages down in the comments: "The commenters pointing out that the diagrams break down in case of multiple and or duplicate results, are absolutely right. I was actually thinking of joins along the primary key, which tends to be unique by definition, although the examples are not expressed that way. Like the cartesian or cross product, anything that results in more rows than you originally started with does absolutely breaks the whole venn diagram concept. So keep that in mind." – philipxy Nov 13 '15 at 1:22
  • @philipxy yes the Venn diagram analogy only works for the primary key after ignoring NULLs- this is often not stated. The Venn diagrams don't help to explain how the other columns in the resulting set are filled with NULLs. – Galax Jan 19 '16 at 16:18
  • 1
    @Galax Unfortunately, whether the joins are on keys (let alone primary keys) doesn't help the diagrams to make sense. (Even though I quoted Jeff saying that he thinks it does.) (I don't understand your "works for the primary key after ignoring NULLs" or "the other columns in the resulting set are filled with NULLs". I know more or less the sort of thing you are trying to say but any correspondence but the one in my comment to the question is complex and so is a clear explanation. Although I would welcome one. Exactly what are being grouped how by the circles? – philipxy Jan 20 '16 at 6:27
up vote 545 down vote
+500

The Venn diagrams don't really do it for me.

They don't show any distinction between a cross join and an inner join, for example, or more generally show any distinction between different types of join predicate or provide a framework for reasoning about how they will operate.

There is no substitute for understanding the logical processing and it is relatively straightforward to grasp anyway.

  1. Imagine a cross join.
  2. Evaluate the on clause against all rows from step 1 keeping those where the predicate evaluates to true
  3. (For outer joins only) add back in any outer rows that were lost in step 2.

(NB: In practice the query optimiser may find more efficient ways of executing the query than the purely logical description above but the final result must be the same)

I'll start off with an animated version of a full outer join. Further explanation follows.

enter image description here


Explanation

Source Tables

enter link description here

First start with a CROSS JOIN (AKA Cartesian Product). This does not have an ON clause and simply returns every combination of rows from the two tables.

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A CROSS JOIN B

enter link description here

Inner and Outer joins have an "ON" clause predicate.

  • Inner Join. Evaluate the condition in the "ON" clause for all rows in the cross join result. If true return the joined row. Otherwise discard it.
  • Left Outer Join. Same as inner join then for any rows in the left table that did not match anything output these with NULL values for the right table columns.
  • Right Outer Join. Same as inner join then for any rows in the right table that did not match anything output these with NULL values for the left table columns.
  • Full Outer Join. Same as inner join then preserve left non matched rows as in left outer join and right non matching rows as per right outer join.

Some examples

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A INNER JOIN B ON A.Colour = B.Colour

The above is the classic equi join.

Inner Join

Animated Version

enter image description here

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A INNER JOIN B ON A.Colour NOT IN ('Green','Blue')

The inner join condition need not necessarily be an equality condition and it need not reference columns from both (or even either) of the tables. Evaluating A.Colour NOT IN ('Green','Blue') on each row of the cross join returns.

inner 2

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A INNER JOIN B ON 1 =1

The join condition evaluates to true for all rows in the cross join result so this is just the same as a cross join. I won't repeat the picture of the 16 rows again.

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A LEFT OUTER JOIN B ON A.Colour = B.Colour

Outer Joins are logically evaluated in the same way as inner joins except that if a row from the left table (for a left join) does not join with any rows from the right hand table at all it is preserved in the result with NULL values for the right hand columns.

LOJ

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A LEFT OUTER JOIN B ON A.Colour = B.Colour WHERE B.Colour IS NULL

This simply restricts the previous result to only return the rows where B.Colour IS NULL. In this particular case these will be the rows that were preserved as they had no match in the right hand table and the query returns the single red row not matched in table B. This is known as an anti semi join.

It is important to select a column for the IS NULL test that is either not nullable or for which the join condition ensures that any NULL values will be excluded in order for this pattern to work correctly and avoid just bringing back rows which happen to have a NULL value for that column in addition to the un matched rows.

loj is null

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A RIGHT OUTER JOIN B ON A.Colour = B.Colour

Right outer joins act similarly to left outer joins except they preserve non matching rows from the right table and null extend the left hand columns.

ROJ

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A FULL OUTER JOIN B ON A.Colour = B.Colour

Full outer joins combine the behaviour of left and right joins and preserve the non matching rows from both the left and the right tables.

FOJ

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A FULL OUTER JOIN B ON 1 = 0

No rows in the cross join match the 1=0 predicate. All rows from both sides are preserved using normal outer join rules with NULL in the columns from the table on the other side.

FOJ 2

SELECT COALESCE(A.Colour, B.Colour) AS Colour FROM A FULL OUTER JOIN B ON 1 = 0

With a minor amend to the preceding query one could simulate a UNION ALL of the two tables.

UNION ALL

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A LEFT OUTER JOIN B ON A.Colour = B.Colour WHERE B.Colour = 'Green'

Note that the WHERE clause (if present) logically runs after the join. One common error is to perform a left outer join and then include a WHERE clause with a condition on the right table that ends up excluding the non matching rows. The above ends up performing the outer join...

LOJ

... And then the "Where" clause runs. NULL= 'Green' does not evaluate to true so the row preserved by the outer join ends up discarded (along with the blue one) effectively converting the join back to an inner one.

LOJtoInner

If the intention was to include only rows from B where Colour is Green and all rows from A regardless the correct syntax would be

SELECT A.Colour, B.Colour FROM A LEFT OUTER JOIN B ON A.Colour = B.Colour AND B.Colour = 'Green'

enter image description here

SQL Fiddle

See these examples run live at SQLFiddle.com.

  • 36
    I will say that while this doesn't work for me nearly as well as the Venn diagrams, I appreciate that people vary and learn differently and this is a very well presented explanation unlike any I've seen before, so I support @ypercube in awarding the bonus points. Also good work explaining the difference of putting additional conditions in the JOIN clause vs the WHERE clause. Kudos to you, Martin Smith. – Old Pro Dec 20 '14 at 4:48
  • 16
    @OldPro The Venn diagrams are OK as far as they go I suppose but they are silent on how to represent a cross join, or to differentiate one kind of join predicate such as equi join from another. The mental model of evaluating the join predicate on each row of the cross join result then adding back in unmatched rows if an outer join and finally evaluating the where works better for me. – Martin Smith Dec 20 '14 at 11:05
  • 10
    The Venn diagrams are good for representing Unions and Intersections and Differences but not joins. They have some minor educational value for very simple joins, i.e. joins where the joining condition is on unique columns. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Dec 20 '14 at 22:28
  • 9
    @Arth - Nope you're wrong. SQL Fiddle sqlfiddle.com/#!3/9eecb7db59d16c80417c72d1/5155 this is something the Venn diagrams can't illustrate. – Martin Smith Jan 28 '16 at 15:54
  • 6
    @MartinSmith Wow, I agree, I'm totally wrong! Too used to working with one-to-manys.. thanks for the correction. – Arth Jan 28 '16 at 15:57

The following was taken from the article "MySQL - LEFT JOIN and RIGHT JOIN, INNER JOIN and OUTER JOIN" by Graham Ellis on his blog Horse's Mouth.

In a database such as MySQL, data is divided into a number of tables which are then connected (Joined) together by JOIN in SELECT commands to read records from multiple tables. Read this example to see how it works.

First, some sample data:

people
    mysql> select * from people;
    +------------+--------------+------+
    | name       | phone        | pid  |
    +------------+--------------+------+
    | Mr Brown   | 01225 708225 |    1 |
    | Miss Smith | 01225 899360 |    2 |
    | Mr Pullen  | 01380 724040 |    3 |
    +------------+--------------+------+
    3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

property
    mysql> select * from property;
    +------+------+----------------------+
    | pid  | spid | selling              |
    +------+------+----------------------+
    |    1 |    1 | Old House Farm       |
    |    3 |    2 | The Willows          |
    |    3 |    3 | Tall Trees           |
    |    3 |    4 | The Melksham Florist |
    |    4 |    5 | Dun Roamin           |
    +------+------+----------------------+
    5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

REGULAR JOIN

If we do a regular JOIN (with none of the keywords INNER, OUTER, LEFT or RIGHT), then we get all records that match in the appropriate way in the two tables, and records in both incoming tables that do not match are not reported:

mysql> select name, phone, selling 
from people join property 
on people.pid = property.pid;
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
| name      | phone        | selling              |
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
| Mr Brown  | 01225 708225 | Old House Farm       |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | The Willows          |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | Tall Trees           |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | The Melksham Florist |
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
4 rows in set (0.01 sec)

LEFT JOIN

If we do a LEFT JOIN, we get all records that match in the same way and IN ADDITION we get an extra record for each unmatched record in the left table of the join - thus ensuring (in this example) that every PERSON gets a mention:

   mysql> select name, phone, selling 
    from people left join property 
    on people.pid = property.pid; 
    +------------+--------------+----------------------+
    | name       | phone        | selling              |
    +------------+--------------+----------------------+
    | Mr Brown   | 01225 708225 | Old House Farm       |
    | Miss Smith | 01225 899360 | NULL <<-- unmatch    |
    | Mr Pullen  | 01380 724040 | The Willows          |
    | Mr Pullen  | 01380 724040 | Tall Trees           |
    | Mr Pullen  | 01380 724040 | The Melksham Florist |
    +------------+--------------+----------------------+
    5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

RIGHT JOIN

If we do a RIGHT JOIN, we get all the records that match and IN ADDITION an extra record for each unmatched record in the right table of the join - in my example, that means that each property gets a mention even if we don't have seller details:

mysql> select name, phone, selling 
from people right join property 
on people.pid = property.pid;
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
| name      | phone        | selling              |
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
| Mr Brown  | 01225 708225 | Old House Farm       |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | The Willows          |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | Tall Trees           |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | The Melksham Florist |
| NULL      | NULL         | Dun Roamin           |
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

An INNER JOIN does a full join, just like the first example, and the word OUTER may be added after the word LEFT or RIGHT in the last two examples - it's provided for ODBC compatibility and doesn't add an extra capabilities.

  • 11
    REGULAR JOIN and INNER JOIN are the same thing. What Graham Ellis wanted to say whit REGULAR is that INNER JOIN is the "default" JOIN, when none of LEFT or RIGHT keywords were specified. If you read the whole post, in the end He says "An INNER JOIN does a full join, just like the first example, and the word OUTER may be added after the word LEFT or RIGHT in the last two examples - it's provided for ODBC compatibility and doesn't add an extra capabilities." – vegatripy Aug 19 '13 at 11:04
  • 2
    For those who are confused by pid and spid, pid stands for "person id", and spid stands for "sale property id". – Andrew Grimm Sep 14 '15 at 3:47
  • What if we only want to select Mr.BROWN,Miss SMITH AND Mr Pullen ? – Fortune Jun 21 '16 at 8:11
  • @Fortune Select (rows having name equal to one of) them from what? How is this related to the difference between inner & outer joins? – philipxy Aug 20 '16 at 15:27
  • many answer don't think about one--multiplicity situation,and this will mislead someone ,your answer is better! – rocket1037 May 25 '17 at 10:10

Joins are used to combine the data from two tables, with the result being a new, temporary table. Joins are performed based on something called a predicate, which specifies the condition to use in order to perform a join. The difference between an inner join and an outer join is that an inner join will return only the rows that actually match based on the join predicate. Lets consider Employee and Location table:

enter image description here

Inner Join:- Inner join creates a new result table by combining column values of two tables (Employee and Location) based upon the join-predicate. The query compares each row of Employee with each row of Location to find all pairs of rows which satisfy the join-predicate. When the join-predicate is satisfied by matching non-NULL values, column values for each matched pair of rows of Employee and Location are combined into a result row. Here’s what the SQL for an inner join will look like:

select  * from employee inner join location on employee.empID = location.empID
OR
select  * from employee, location where employee.empID = location.empID

Now, here is what the result of running that SQL would look like: enter image description here enter image description here

Outer Join:- An outer join does not require each record in the two joined tables to have a matching record. The joined table retains each record—even if no other matching record exists. Outer joins subdivide further into left outer joins and right outer joins, depending on which table's rows are retained (left or right).

Left Outer Join:- The result of a left outer join (or simply left join) for tables Employee and Location always contains all records of the "left" table (Employee), even if the join-condition does not find any matching record in the "right" table (Location). Here is what the SQL for a left outer join would look like, using the tables above:

select  * from employee left outer join location on employee.empID = location.empID;
//Use of outer keyword is optional

Now, here is what the result of running this SQL would look like: enter image description here enter image description here

Right Outer Join:- A right outer join (or right join) closely resembles a left outer join, except with the treatment of the tables reversed. Every row from the "right" table (Location) will appear in the joined table at least once. If no matching row from the "left" table (Employee) exists, NULL will appear in columns from Employee for those records that have no match in Location. This is what the SQL looks like:

select * from employee right outer join location  on employee.empID = location.empID;
//Use of outer keyword is optional

Using the tables above, we can show what the result set of a right outer join would look like:

enter image description hereenter image description here

Full Outer Joins:- Full Outer Join or Full Join is to retain the nonmatching information by including nonmatching rows in the results of a join, use a full outer join. It includes all rows from both tables, regardless of whether or not the other table has a matching value. enter image description here

Image Source

MySQL 8.0 Reference Manual - Join Syntax

Oracle Join operations

Inner Join

Retrieve the matched rows only, that is, A intersect B.

Enter image description here

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Students S
INNER JOIN dbo.Advisors A
    ON S.Advisor_ID = A.Advisor_ID

Left Outer Join

Select all records from the first table, and any records in the second table that match the joined keys.

Enter image description here

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Students S
LEFT JOIN dbo.Advisors A
    ON S.Advisor_ID = A.Advisor_ID

Full Outer Join

Select all records from the second table, and any records in the first table that match the joined keys.

Enter image description here

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Students S
FULL JOIN dbo.Advisors A
    ON S.Advisor_ID = A.Advisor_ID

References

  • 13
    What is the name of tool? I find it is interesting as it shows number of rows and venn-diagrams – Grijesh Chauhan Jan 27 '14 at 12:23
  • 7
    @GrijeshChauhan Datamartist :) – Tushar Gupta Jan 27 '14 at 12:25
  • 2
    @Trushar :( it is not for Linux system.. – Grijesh Chauhan Jan 27 '14 at 12:27
  • 2
    @GrijeshChauhan Yeah But you can Try to run it using wine . – Tushar Gupta Jan 27 '14 at 12:30
  • 2
    Ohh! yes I ..I used SQLyog using wine.. there is also PlayOnLinux – Grijesh Chauhan Jan 27 '14 at 12:32

In simple words:

An inner join retrieve the matched rows only.

Whereas an outer join retrieve the matched rows from one table and all rows in other table ....the result depends on which one you are using:

  • Left: Matched rows in the right table and all rows in the left table

  • Right: Matched rows in the left table and all rows in the right table or

  • Full: All rows in all tables. It doesn't matter if there is a match or not

  • @nomen Not that this answer addresses it, but INNER JOIN is an intersection and FULL OUTER JOIN is the corresponding UNION if the left & right sets/circles contain the rows of (respectively) LEFT & RIGHT join. PS This answer is unclear about rows in input vs output. It confuses "in the left/right table" with "has a left/right part in the left/right" and it uses "matched row" vs "all" to mean row extended by row from other table vs by nulls. – philipxy Nov 29 '15 at 1:17

A inner join only shows rows if there is a matching record on the other (right) side of the join.

A (left) outer join shows rows for each record on the left hand side, even if there are no matching rows on the other (right) side of the join. If there is no matching row, the columns for the other (right) side would show NULLs.

Inner joins require that a record with a related ID exist in the joined table.

Outer joins will return records for the left side even if nothing exists for the right side.

For instance, you have an Orders and an OrderDetails table. They are related by an "OrderID".

Orders

  • OrderID
  • CustomerName

OrderDetails

  • OrderDetailID
  • OrderID
  • ProductName
  • Qty
  • Price

The request

SELECT Orders.OrderID, Orders.CustomerName
  FROM Orders 
 INNER JOIN OrderDetails
    ON Orders.OrderID = OrderDetails.OrderID

will only return Orders that also have something in the OrderDetails table.

If you change it to OUTER LEFT JOIN

SELECT Orders.OrderID, Orders.CustomerName
  FROM Orders 
  LEFT JOIN OrderDetails
    ON Orders.OrderID = OrderDetails.OrderID

then it will return records from the Orders table even if they have no OrderDetails records.

You can use this to find Orders that do not have any OrderDetails indicating a possible orphaned order by adding a where clause like WHERE OrderDetails.OrderID IS NULL.

  • 1
    I appreciate the simple yet realistic example. I changed a request like SELECT c.id, c.status, cd.name, c.parent_id, cd.description, c.image FROM categories c, categories_description cd WHERE c.id = cd.categories_id AND c.status = 1 AND cd.language_id = 2 ORDER BY c.parent_id ASC to SELECT c.id, c.status, cd.name, c.parent_id, cd.description, c.image FROM categories c INNER JOIN categories_description cd ON c.id = cd.categories_id WHERE c.status = 1 AND cd.language_id = 2 ORDER BY c.parent_id ASC (MySQL) with success. I wasn't sure about the additional conditions, they mix well... – PhiLho Jan 5 '13 at 11:11

In simple words :

Inner join -> Take ONLY common records from parent and child tables WHERE primary key of Parent table matches Foreign key in Child table.

Left join ->

pseudo code

1.Take All records from left Table
2.for(each record in right table,) {
    if(Records from left & right table matching on primary & foreign key){
       use their values as it is as result of join at the right side for 2nd table.
    } else {
       put value NULL values in that particular record as result of join at the right side for 2nd table.
    }
  }

Right join : Exactly opposite of left join . Put name of table in LEFT JOIN at right side in Right join , you get same output as LEFT JOIN.

Outer join : Show all records in Both tables No matter what. If records in Left table are not matching to right table based on Primary , Forieign key , use NULL value as result of join .

Example :

Example

Lets assume now for 2 tables

1.employees , 2.phone_numbers_employees

employees : id , name 

phone_numbers_employees : id , phone_num , emp_id   

Here , employees table is Master table , phone_numbers_employees is child table(it contains emp_id as foreign key which connects employee.id so its child table.)

Inner joins

Take the records of 2 tables ONLY IF Primary key of employees table(its id) matches Foreign key of Child table phone_numbers_employees(emp_id).

So query would be :

SELECT e.id , e.name , p.phone_num FROM employees AS e INNER JOIN phone_numbers_employees AS p ON e.id = p.emp_id;

Here take only matching rows on primary key = foreign key as explained above.Here non matching rows on primary key = foreign key are skipped as result of join.

Left joins :

Left join retains all rows of the left table, regardless of whether there is a row that matches on the right table.

SELECT e.id , e.name , p.phone_num FROM employees AS e LEFT JOIN phone_numbers_employees AS p ON e.id = p.emp_id;

Outer joins :

SELECT e.id , e.name , p.phone_num FROM employees AS e OUTER JOIN phone_numbers_employees AS p ON e.id = p.emp_id;

Diagramatically it looks like :

Diagram

  • 1
    The result has nothing to (do per se) with primary/unique/candidate keys & foreign keys. The baviour can and should be described without reference to them. A cross join is calculated, then rows not matching the ON condition are filtered out; additionally for outer joins rows filtered/unmatched rows are extended by NULLs (per LEFT/RIGHT/FULL and included. – philipxy Aug 10 '15 at 4:27

You use INNER JOIN to return all rows from both tables where there is a match. i.e. In the resulting table all the rows and columns will have values.

In OUTER JOIN the resulting table may have empty columns. Outer join may be either LEFT or RIGHT.

LEFT OUTER JOIN returns all the rows from the first table, even if there are no matches in the second table.

RIGHT OUTER JOIN returns all the rows from the second table, even if there are no matches in the first table.

This is a good explanation for joins

This is a good diagrammatic explanation for all kind of joins

source: http://ssiddique.info/understanding-sql-joins-in-easy-way.html

INNER JOIN requires there is at least a match in comparing the two tables. For example, table A and table B which implies A ٨ B (A intersection B).

LEFT OUTER JOIN and LEFT JOIN are the same. It gives all the records matching in both tables and all possibilities of the left table.

Similarly, RIGHT OUTER JOIN and RIGHT JOIN are the same. It gives all the records matching in both tables and all possibilities of the right table.

FULL JOIN is the combination of LEFT OUTER JOIN and RIGHT OUTER JOIN without duplication.

The answer is in the meaning of each one, so in the results.

Note :
In SQLite there is no RIGHT OUTER JOIN or FULL OUTER JOIN.
And also in MySQL there is no FULL OUTER JOIN.

My answer is based on above Note.

When you have two tables like these:

--[table1]               --[table2]
id | name                id | name
---+-------              ---+-------
1  | a1                  1  | a2
2  | b1                  3  | b2

CROSS JOIN / OUTER JOIN :
You can have all of those tables data with CROSS JOIN or just with , like this:

SELECT * FROM table1, table2
--[OR]
SELECT * FROM table1 CROSS JOIN table2

--[Results:]
id | name | id | name 
---+------+----+------
1  | a1   | 1  | a2
1  | a1   | 3  | b2
2  | b1   | 1  | a2
2  | b1   | 3  | b2

INNER JOIN :
When you want to add a filter to above results based on a relation like table1.id = table2.id you can use INNER JOIN:

SELECT * FROM table1, table2 WHERE table1.id = table2.id
--[OR]
SELECT * FROM table1 INNER JOIN table2 ON table1.id = table2.id

--[Results:]
id | name | id | name 
---+------+----+------
1  | a1   | 1  | a2

LEFT [OUTER] JOIN :
When you want to have all rows of one of tables in the above result -with same relation- you can use LEFT JOIN:
(For RIGHT JOIN just change place of tables)

SELECT * FROM table1, table2 WHERE table1.id = table2.id 
UNION ALL
SELECT *, Null, Null FROM table1 WHERE Not table1.id In (SELECT id FROM table2)
--[OR]
SELECT * FROM table1 LEFT JOIN table2 ON table1.id = table2.id

--[Results:]
id | name | id   | name 
---+------+------+------
1  | a1   | 1    | a2
2  | b1   | Null | Null

FULL OUTER JOIN :
When you also want to have all rows of the other table in your results you can use FULL OUTER JOIN:

SELECT * FROM table1, table2 WHERE table1.id = table2.id
UNION ALL
SELECT *, Null, Null FROM table1 WHERE Not table1.id In (SELECT id FROM table2)
UNION ALL
SELECT Null, Null, * FROM table2 WHERE Not table2.id In (SELECT id FROM table1)
--[OR] (recommended for SQLite)
SELECT * FROM table1 LEFT JOIN table2 ON table1.id = table2.id
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM table2 LEFT JOIN table1 ON table2.id = table1.id
WHERE table1.id IS NULL
--[OR]
SELECT * FROM table1 FULL OUTER JOIN table2 On table1.id = table2.id

--[Results:]
id   | name | id   | name 
-----+------+------+------
1    | a1   | 1    | a2
2    | b1   | Null | Null
Null | Null | 3    | b2

Well, as your need you choose each one that covers your need ;).

  • You can add to your note, that there is no full outer join in MySQL either. – potashin Jun 14 '15 at 13:34

The difference is in the way tables are joined if there are no common records.

  • JOIN is same as INNER JOIN and means to only show records common to both tables. Whether the records are common is determined by the fields in join clause. For example:

    FROM t1
    JOIN t2 on t1.ID = t2.ID
    

    means show only records where the same ID value exists in both tables.

  • LEFT JOIN is same as LEFT OUTER JOIN and means to show all records from left table (i.e. the one that precedes in SQL statement) regardless of the existance of matching records in the right table.

  • RIGHT JOIN is same as RIGHT OUTER JOIN and means opposite of LEFT JOIN, i.e. shows all records from the second (right) table and only matching records from first (left) table.

Source: What's the difference between LEFT, RIGHT, INNER, OUTER, JOIN?

Inner join.

A join is combining the rows from two tables. An inner join attempts to match up the two tables based on the criteria you specify in the query, and only returns the rows that match. If a row from the first table in the join matches two rows in the second table, then two rows will be returned in the results. If there’s a row in the first table that doesn’t match a row in the second, it’s not returned; likewise, if there’s a row in the second table that doesn’t match a row in the first, it’s not returned.

Outer Join.

A left join attempts to find match up the rows from the first table to rows in the second table. If it can’t find a match, it will return the columns from the first table and leave the columns from the second table blank (null).

I don't see much details about performance and optimizer in the other answers.

Sometimes it is good to know that only INNER JOIN is associative which means the optimizer has the most option to play with it. It can reorder the join order to make it faster keeping the same result. The optimizer can use the most join modes.

Generally it is a good practice to try to use INNER JOIN instead of the different kind of joins. (Of course if it is possible considering the expected result set.)

There are a couple of good examples and explanation here about this strange associative behavior:

  • 3
    It can't possibly be "good practice" to use one type of join over another. Which join you use determines the data that you want. If you use a different one you're incorrect. Plus, in Oracle at least this answer is completely wrong. It sounds completely wrong for everything and you have no proof. Do you have proof? – Ben Dec 26 '14 at 8:51
  • 1. I mean try to use. I saw lots of people using LEFT OUTER joins everywhere without any good reason. (The joined columns were 'not null'.) In those cases it would be definitely better to use INNER joins. 2. I have added a link explaining the non-associative behaviour better than I could. – Lajos Veres Dec 26 '14 at 11:01
  • As I know INNER JOIN is slower than LEFT JOIN in most of the times, And people can use LEFT JOIN instead of INNER JOIN by adding a WHERE for removing unexpected NULL results ;). – shA.t May 13 '15 at 3:01
  • These comments made me a bit uncertain. Why do you think INNER is slower? – Lajos Veres May 13 '15 at 8:04

The difference is in the way tables are joined if there are no common records.

JOIN is same as INNER JOIN and means to only show records common to both tables. Whether the records are common is determined by the fields in join clause.

For example:

SELECT * 
FROM t1
JOIN t2 on t1.ID = t2.ID

It means show only records where the same ID value exists in both tables.

LEFT JOIN is same as LEFT OUTER JOIN and means to show all records from left table (i.e. the one that precedes in SQL statement) regardless of the existence of matching records in the right table.

RIGHT JOIN is same as RIGHT OUTER JOIN and means opposite of LEFT JOIN, i.e. shows all records from the second (right) table and only matching records from first (left) table.

  • I'm not agree with RIGHT OUTER JOIN and means opposite of LEFT JOIN, I think opposite of LEFT JOIN is show each records from left table regardless of the not existence of matching in the right table is you said in LEFT JOIN ;). – shA.t Jun 15 '15 at 4:43
  • The most precise and concise definitions of LEFT JOIN and RIGHT JOIN. – bad_keypoints Jan 1 '16 at 9:09

Having criticized the much-loved red-shaded Venn diagram, I thought it only fair to post my own attempt.

Although @Martin Smith's answer is the best of this bunch by a long way, his only shows the key column from each table, whereas I think ideally non-key columns should also be shown.

The best I could do in the half hour allowed, I still don't think it adequately shows that the nulls are there due to absence of key values in TableB or that OUTER JOIN is actually a union rather than a join:

enter image description here

  • 2
    Question is asking for Difference between INNER and OUTER joins though, not necessarily left outer join lol – LearnByReading Jan 22 '16 at 19:32

The precise algorithm for INNER JOIN, LEFT/RIGHT OUTER JOIN are as following:

  1. Take each row from the first table: a
  2. Consider all rows from second table beside it: (a, b[i])
  3. Evaluate the ON ... clause against each pair: ON( a, b[i] ) = true/false?
    • When the condition evaluates to true, return that combined row (a, b[i]).
    • When reach end of second table without any match, and this is an Outer Join then return a (virtual) pair using Null for all columns of other table: (a, Null) for LEFT outer join or (Null, b) for RIGHT outer join. This is to ensure all rows of first table exists in final results.

Note: the condition specified in ON clause could be anything, it is not required to use Primary Keys (and you don't need to always refer to Columns from both tables)! For example:

Inner Join vs. Left Outer Join


enter image description here

Note: Left Join = Left Outer Join, Right Join = Right Outer Join.

Inner Join An inner join focuses on the commonality between two tables. When using an inner join, there must be at least some matching data between two (or more) tables that are being compared. An inner join searches tables for matching or overlapping data. Upon finding it, the inner join combines and returns the information into one new table.

Outer Join An outer join returns a set of records (or rows) that include what an inner join would return but also includes other rows for which no corresponding match is found in the other table.

There are three types of outer joins:

Left Outer Join (or Left Join) Right Outer Join (or Right Join) Full Outer Join (or Full Join) Each of these outer joins refers to the part of the data that is being compared, combined, and returned. Sometimes nulls will be produced in this process as some data is shared while other data is not.

Simplest Definitions

Inner Join: Returns matched records from both tables.

Full Outer Join: Returns matched and unmatched records from both tables with null for unmatched records from Both Tables.

Left Outer Join: Returns matched and unmatched records only from table on Left Side.

Right Outer Join: Returns matched and unmatched records only from table on Right Side.

In-Short

Matched + Left Unmatched + Right Unmatched = Full Outer Join

Matched + Left Unmatched = Left Outer Join

Matched + Right Unmatched = Right Outer Join

Matched = Inner Join

  • 1
    This is brilliant and explains why join doesn't work as expected for Time Series index's. Time stamps one second apart are unmatched. – yeliabsalohcin Sep 5 '17 at 9:22
  • @yeliabsalohcin You don't explain "as expected" here or "works" in your comment on the question. It's just some unexplained personal misconception you strangely expect others to have. If you treat words as sloppily when you are reading--misinterpreting clear writing and/or accepting unclear writing--as when you are writing here then you can expect to have misconceptions. In fact this answer like most here is unclear & wrong. "Inner Join: Returns matched records from both tables" is wrong when input column sets differ. It's trying to say a certain something, but it isn't. (See my answer.) – philipxy Nov 22 '17 at 2:52

INNER JOIN

An inner join produces a result set that is limited to the rows where there is a match in both tables for what we're looking for. If you don't know which kind of join you need, this will usually be your best bet.

LEFT OUTER JOIN

A left outer join, or left join, results in a set where all of the rows from the first, or left hand side, table are preserved. The rows from the second, or right hand side table only show up if they have a match with the rows from the first table. Where there are values from the left table but not from the right, the table will read null, which means that the value has not been set.

RIGHT OUTER JOIN

A right outer join, or right join, is the same as a left join, except the roles are reversed. All of the rows from the right hand side table show up in the result, but the rows from the table on the left are only there if they match the table on the right. Empty spaces are null, just like with the the left join.

FULL OUTER JOIN

A full outer join, or just outer join, produces a result set with all of the rows of both tables, regardless of whether there are any matches. Similarly to the left and right joins, we call the empty spaces null.

For More Reference

enter image description here

  • INNER JOIN most typical join for two or more tables. It returns data match on both table ON primarykey and forignkey relation.
  • OUTER JOIN is same as INNER JOIN, but it also include NULL data on ResultSet.
    • LEFT JOIN = INNER JOIN + Unmatched data of left table with Null match on right table.
    • RIGHT JOIN = INNER JOIN + Unmatched data of right table with Null match on left table.
    • FULL JOIN = INNER JOIN + Unmatched data on both right and left tables with null matches.
  • Self join is not a keyword in SQL, when a table references data in itself knows as self join. Using INNER JOIN and OUTER JOIN we can write self join queries.

For example:

SELECT * 
FROM   tablea a 
       INNER JOIN tableb b 
               ON a.primary_key = b.foreign_key 
       INNER JOIN tablec c 
               ON b.primary_key = c.foreign_key 
  • good and simpler to understand. – ArifMustafa Apr 19 at 13:25

What is the difference between “INNER JOIN” and “OUTER JOIN”?

They are the most commonly used existential operators in SQL, where INNER JOIN is used for 'exists' and LEFT OUTER JOIN is used for 'does not exist'.

Consider these queries:

users who have posted and have votes
users who have posted but have no badges

People who look for set-based solutions (an industry term) would recognise the respective queries as:

users who have posted INTERSECT users who have votes
users who have posted MINUS users who have badges

Translating these into standard SQL:

SELECT UserId FROM Posts
INTERSECT 
SELECT UserId FROM Votes;

SELECT UserId FROM Posts
EXCEPT 
SELECT UserId FROM Badges;

Others will think along similar lines of set inclusion:

users who have posted and IN the set of users who have votes
users who have posted and NOT IN the set of users who have badges

Translating these into standard SQL:

SELECT UserId 
  FROM Posts
 WHERE UserId IN ( SELECT UserId FROM Votes );

SELECT UserId 
  FROM Posts
 WHERE UserId NOT IN ( SELECT UserId FROM Badges );

Some will think in terms of 'existance' within sets e.g.

users who have posted and EXIST in the set of users who have votes
users who have posted and do NOT EXIST in the set of users who have badges

Translating these into standard SQL (note we now need to use range variables i.e. p, v, b):

SELECT p.UserId 
  FROM Posts p
 WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT *
                  FROM Votes v
                 WHERE v.UserId = p.UserId );

SELECT p.UserId 
  FROM Posts p
 WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT *
                      FROM Badges b
                     WHERE b.UserId = p.UserId );

However, I've found that the "industry standard" approach is to exclusively use joins. I don't know what the thinking is here (Law of the Instrument? Premature optimization?), so I'll go straight to the syntax:

SELECT p.UserId 
  FROM Posts p
       INNER JOIN Votes v ON v.UserId = p.UserId;

SELECT p.UserId 
  FROM Posts p
       LEFT JOIN Badges b ON b.UserId = p.UserId
 WHERE b.UserId IS NULL;

Things to note:

  • The only projection is from Users but we still need all those range variables (p, v, b) for search conditions.
  • The UserId IS NULL search condition 'belongs' to the the OUTER JOIN but is disconnected in the query.
  • LEFT is the industry standard: professionals will rewrite a query to avoid using RIGHT!
  • The OUTER keyword from LEFT OUTER JOIN is omitted.

Closing remarks:

Sometimes joins are used in queries solely to determine whether values exist or do not exists in another set. Learn to look carefully at the attributes being projected (the columns in the SELECT clause): if there are none from the joined table then they are simply being used as existential operators. Additionally for outer join, look for instances of <key_column> IS NULL in the WHERE clause.

  • Inner join - An inner join using either of the equivalent queries gives the intersection of the two tables, i.e. the two rows they have in common.

  • Left outer join - A left outer join will give all rows in A, plus any common rows in B.

  • Full outer join - A full outer join will give you the union of A and B, i.e. All the rows in A and all the rows in B. If something in A doesn't have a corresponding datum in B, then the B portion is null, and vice versay

  • This is both wrong and unclear. Join is not an intersection unless the tables have the same columns. Outer joins don't have rows from A or B unless they have the same columns, in which case there are not nulls added. You are trying to say something, but you are not saying it. You are not explaining correctly or clearly. – philipxy Feb 3 '17 at 11:15
  • @philipxy: Disagreed on your statement Join is not an intersection unless the tables have the same columns No. You can join any columns that you want and if the value match, they will join together. – Isaac Lem Apr 11 '17 at 9:23
  • That comment is as unclear as your answer. (I suppose you might be thinking something like, the set of subrow values for the common columns of the result is the intersection of the sets of subrow values for the common columns of each of the inputs; but that's not what you have written. You are not clear.) – philipxy Apr 11 '17 at 14:24

In Simple Terms,

1.INNER JOIN OR EQUI JOIN : Returns the resultset that matches only the condition in both the tables.

2.OUTER JOIN : Returns the resultset of all the values from both the tables even if there is condition match or not.

3.LEFT JOIN : Returns the resultset of all the values from left table and only rows that match the condition in right table.

4.RIGHT JOIN : Returns the resultset of all the values from right table and only rows that match the condition in left table.

5.FULL JOIN : Full Join and Full outer Join are same.

1.Inner Join: Also called as Join. It returns the rows present in both the Left table, and right table only if there is a match. Otherwise, it returns zero records.

Example:

SELECT
  e1.emp_name,
  e2.emp_salary    
FROM emp1 e1
INNER JOIN emp2 e2
  ON e1.emp_id = e2.emp_id

output1

2.Full Outer Join: Also called as Full Join. It returns all the rows present in both the Left table, and right table.

Example:

SELECT
  e1.emp_name,
  e2.emp_salary    
FROM emp1 e1
FULL OUTER JOIN emp2 e2
  ON e1.emp_id = e2.emp_id

output2

3.Left Outer join: Or simply called as Left Join. It returns all the rows present in the Left table and matching rows from the right table (if any).

4.Right Outer Join: Also called as Right Join. It returns matching rows from the left table (if any), and all the rows present in the Right table.

joins

Advantages of Joins

  1. Executes faster.
  • This is only correct when the tables have the same column set. (It confuses inner join with intersection & full join with union.) Also "match" is undefined. Read my other comments. – philipxy Jul 24 '17 at 13:02

The difference between inner join and outer join is as follow:

  1. Inner join is a join that combined tables based on matching tuples, whereas outer join is a join that combined table based on both matched and unmatched tuple.
  2. Inner join merges matched row from two table in where unmatched row are omitted, whereas outer join merges rows from two tables and unmatched rows fill with null value.
  3. Inner join is like an intersection operation, whereas outer join is like an union operation.
  4. Inner join is two types, whereas outer join are three types.
  5. Inner join is slower, whereas outer join is faster than inner join.

protected by Kev Jul 21 '12 at 21:51

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.