19

Been having a play about with ef core and been having an issue with the include statement. For this code I get 2 companies which is what i expected.

public IEnumerable<Company> GetAllCompanies(HsDbContext db)
{
    var c = db.Company;
    return c;
}

This returns

[
    {
        "id":1,
        "companyName":"new",
        "admins":null,
        "employees":null,
        "courses":null
    },
    {
        "id":2,
        "companyName":"Test Company",
        "admins":null,
        "employees":null,
        "courses":null
    }
]

As you can see there are 2 companies and all related properties are null as i havnt used any includes, which is what i expected. Now when I update the method to this:

public IEnumerable<Company> GetAllCompanies(HsDbContext db)
{
    var c = db.Company
        .Include(t => t.Employees)
        .Include(t => t.Admins)
        .ToList();

    return c;
}

this is what it returns:

[
    {
        "id":1,
        "companyName":"new",
        "admins":[
            {
                "id":2,
                "forename":"User",
                "surname":"1",
                "companyId":1
            }
        ]
    }
]

It only returns one company and only includes the admins. Why did it not include the 2 companies and their employees?

public class Company
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string CompanyName { get; set; }
    public List<Admin> Admins { get; set; }
    public List<Employee> Employees { get; set; }
    public List<Course> Courses { get; set; }

    public string GetFullName()
    {
        return CompanyName;
    }
}

public class Employee
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Forename { get; set; }
    public string Surname { get; set; }
    public int CompanyId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("CompanyId")]
    public Company company { get; set; }

    public ICollection<EmployeeCourse> Employeecourses { get; set; }
}

public class Admin
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Forename { get; set; }
    public string Surname { get; set; }
    public int CompanyId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("CompanyId")]
    public Company Company { get; set; }
}
11
  • Have you tried the same code with EF 6 or lower?
    – Roman
    Jul 24, 2016 at 10:47
  • Whats your EF version?
    – Mafii
    Jul 24, 2016 at 10:51
  • 1
    @Mafii, it is EF Core - EF 7, see the title
    – Roman
    Jul 24, 2016 at 10:52
  • could you include your class definition and the mapping? what was expected? Jul 24, 2016 at 11:37
  • 1
    I have the same problem as @JohnMorrison and whilst the accepted answer by @MohammadAkbari below does work around the problem it means I lose any kind of strong typing to my models. The MS docs (docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/querying/related-data) show that include should work, and also how to achieve it with the Entry API although for various reasons I'd rather not expose the context in my API. I am injecting my DbContext into my repositories. Any further ideas on what causes this problem and how to fix it so that Include() operates as expected?
    – Ashley Bye
    Dec 30, 2016 at 8:54

5 Answers 5

30

I'm not sure if you've seen the accepted answer to this question, but the problem is to do with how the JSON Serializer deals with circular references. Full details and links to more references can be found at the above link, and I'd suggest digging into those, but in short, adding the following to startup.cs will configure the serializer to ignore circular references:

services.AddMvc()
    .AddJsonOptions(options => {
        options.SerializerSettings.ReferenceLoopHandling = ReferenceLoopHandling.Ignore;
    });
6
  • 9
    I don't believe this problem has anything to do with JSON.
    – Langdon
    Jan 3, 2017 at 13:47
  • I disagree, although it's entirely possible that @JohnMorrison only used JSON as a convenient way to express the output. It certainly looks like a serializer reference loop handling issue, but it could very well look that way due to the use of JSON to show output. Why not let the OP state whether that's the case before downvoting?
    – Ashley Bye
    Jan 3, 2017 at 18:30
  • Accutaly this is the way to fix it. Thanks a lot!
    – iamnicoj
    Jan 30, 2017 at 4:09
  • +1 for a very good hint that really helped me. Now, I've tried setting the handling to Error instead of Ignore just to see what happens but there's no exception being thrown. The postman gets nothing in return (no list with unpopulated subfields even). But there's no 500-status or anything reported back. And VS doesn't pops anything neither, when I try to execute the code locally and breakpoint it. Thought on that? (Using Core 2/EF 7 for COre 2.) May 5, 2018 at 22:55
  • I concur with @Langdon. This was clearly a bug in an early EF core version. Later commenters didn't have the same version. Dec 15, 2020 at 8:42
3

Lazy loading is not yet possible with EF Core. Refer here.

Alternatively you can use eager loading.

Read this article

Below is the extension method i have created to achieve the eager loading.

Extension Method:

public static IQueryable<TEntity> IncludeMultiple<TEntity, TProperty>(
    this IQueryable<TEntity> source,
    List<Expression<Func<TEntity, TProperty>>> navigationPropertyPath) where TEntity : class
{
    foreach (var navExpression in navigationPropertyPath)
    {
        source= source.Include(navExpression);
    }
    return source.AsQueryable();
}

Repository Call:

public async Task<TEntity> FindOne(ISpecification<TEntity> spec)
{
    return await Task.Run(() => Context.Set<TEntity>().AsQueryable().IncludeMultiple(spec.IncludeExpression()).Where(spec.IsSatisfiedBy).FirstOrDefault());
}

Usage:

List<object> nestedObjects = new List<object> {new Rules()};

ISpecification<Blog> blogSpec = new BlogSpec(blogId, nestedObjects); 

var challenge = await this._blogRepository.FindOne(blogSpec);

Dependencies:

public class BlogSpec : SpecificationBase<Blog>
{
    readonly int _blogId;
    private readonly List<object> _nestedObjects;

    public ChallengeSpec(int blogid, List<object> nestedObjects)
    {
        this._blogId = blogid;
        _nestedObjects = nestedObjects;
    }

    public override Expression<Func<Challenge, bool>> SpecExpression
    {
        get { return blogSpec => blogSpec.Id == this._blogId; }
    }

    public override List<Expression<Func<Blog, object>>> IncludeExpression()
    {
        List<Expression<Func<Blog, object>>> tobeIncluded = new List<Expression<Func<Blog, object>>>();
        if (_nestedObjects != null)
            foreach (var nestedObject in _nestedObjects)
            {
                if (nestedObject is Rules)
                {
                    Expression<Func<Blog, object>> expr = blog => blog.Rules;
                    tobeIncluded.Add(expr);
                }
                
            }

        return tobeIncluded;
    }
}

Will be glad if it helps. Please note this is not a production ready code.

2

I test your code, this problem exist in my test. in this post LINK Proposed that use data projection. for your problem Something like the following, is work.

[HttpGet]
public dynamic Get()
{
    var dbContext = new ApplicationContext();

    var result = dbContext.Companies
        .Select(e => new { e.CompanyName, e.Id, e.Employees, e.Admins })
        .ToList();

    return result;
}
2
  • Yeah this way works. Thanks. So do you think its an issue with the lazy loading on entity framework? Jul 26, 2016 at 8:31
  • When use include loading method is eagerloading,and data is load in first query Jul 26, 2016 at 9:11
2

Make sure you are using Include from "Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore" And Not from "System.Data.Entity"

0
-1

I know this is an old issue, but its the top result in google, so im putting my solution i I found here. For a Core 3.1 web project there is a quick fix. Add nuget package Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Proxies. Then you simply just need to specify in your options builder when configuring your services. Docs: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/querying/related-data

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) {    
    services.AddDbContextPool<YourDbContext>(options => {
        options.UseLazyLoadingProxies();
        options.UseSqlServer(this.Configuration.GetConnectionString("MyCon"));
    });
}

Now your lazy loading should work as it did in previous EF versions. If you not using it for a web project, you can do it right inside of the OnConfiguringMethod inside of your DbContext itself.

protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder) {
    optionsBuilder.UseLazyLoadingProxies();
}

My EF stuff is kept in a separate class library so i can re-use it through multiple company applications. So having the ability to not lazy load when not needed for a particular application is useful. So i prefer passing in the build options, for reuse-ability purposes. But both will work.

1
  • This was clearly a bug in an earlier version of EF core. It just didn't return all companies, so how would lazy loading change anything? Also, when serializing entities, lazy loading is the last thing you want to happen. Dec 15, 2020 at 8:40

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