How do I find processes that listens to/uses my tcp ports? I'm on mac os x.

Sometimes, after a crash or some bug, my rails app is locking port 3000. I can't find it using ps -ef... How do I find the stupid thing and kill it, brutally... ?

When doing

rails server

I get

Address already in use - bind(2) (Errno::EADDRINUSE)

2014 update:

To complete some of the answers below: After executing the kill commands, deleting the pid file might be necessary rm ~/mypath/myrailsapp/tmp/pids/server.pid

  • 6
    Port 3000 is highly Rails development specific, wouldn't you agree? It's likely that less people will find the answer to this common Rails development issue and that it'll be re-asked if moved. I object. My 2 cents. – oma Sep 21 '13 at 10:20
  • 46
    eh, who cares if 3000 is rails specific....another +1 since I am trying to unlock port 8000....(I don't see why they close such useful questions). – Dean Hiller Dec 30 '13 at 20:52
  • 13
    A very neat solution to kill a process on ANY user-specified port can be found in @Kevin Suttle's answer below. Reproduced here for posterity: function killport() { lsof -i TCP:$1 | grep LISTEN | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9 } – user456584 Jan 17 '14 at 18:39
  • 21
    Putting a reopen vote on this. Developers typically need to manage resources on their own computers. Server Fault is for professional server administrators, not end-user developer machines. – jmort253 Mar 18 '14 at 14:58
  • 16
    I voted to re-open. Bash scripting can be considered programming. – trusktr Nov 17 '14 at 18:54

28 Answers 28

up vote 1991 down vote accepted
  1. You can try netstat

    netstat -vanp tcp | grep 3000
    
  2. For macOS El Capitan and newer (or if your netstat doesn't support -p), use lsof

    sudo lsof -i tcp:3000 
    
  3. For Centos 7 use

    netstat -vanp --tcp | grep 3000
    
  • 4
    netstat -anp fails. netstat: option requires an argument -- p – oma Oct 4 '10 at 12:52
  • 23
    netstat -anp tcp | grep 3000 shows tcp4 1062 0 127.0.0.1.3000 127.0.0.1.51255 ESTABLISHED what next? 1062 is not a pid... – oma Oct 4 '10 at 13:03
  • 12
    oh yes! you're update is correct. lsof -i tcp:3000 nice :) – oma Oct 4 '10 at 14:16
  • 10
    Thank you! Your answer gave birth to my "death_to 'port'" script. (#!/usr/bin/ruby lsof -t -i tcp:#{ARGV.first} | xargs kill) – Sv1 Oct 2 '13 at 18:40
  • 131
    The "terse" flag to lsof produces output suitable for piping to a subsequent kill: lsof -t -i tcp:1234 | xargs kill – Manav Jan 7 '14 at 4:58

Find:

[sudo] lsof -i :3000

Kill:

kill -9 <PID>
  • 22
    Found this most helpful. I like how lsof -i has table headers so I know what all the nonsense means – netpoetica Sep 17 '13 at 5:21
  • 7
    Upvote for simplicity and completeness – BradGreens Oct 9 '13 at 18:59
  • 50
    Sometimes lsof -i :port will show nothing. try sudo lsof -i :port. – kilik52 Jan 30 '14 at 12:05
  • 12
    Recommend trying kill -15 <PID> before resorting to -9 for safety. – Jamon Holmgren Aug 16 '15 at 23:55
  • 7
    @Jamon Holmgren why? what do both do? and why is a kill <PID> not sufficient / dangerous / incomplete? – Michael Trouw Nov 24 '15 at 12:45

Nothing above worked for me. Anyone else with my experience could try the following (worked for me):

Run:

lsof -i :3000 (where 3000 is your current port in use)

then check status of the reported PID :

ps ax | grep <PID>

finally, "begone with it":

kill -QUIT <PID>
  • 5
    This actually seems a better answer than the one give much later by Filip Spiridonov, which has 277 upvotes against your 9. Yours was 6 months earlier, and has the same information with a bit more explanation. There is no justice... – Floris Dec 30 '15 at 22:15

A one-liner to extract the PID of the process using port 3000 and kill it.

lsof -ti:3000 | xargs kill

The -t flag removes everything but the PID from the lsof output, making it easy to kill it.

  • Will also kill browser with localhost:3000 open – rlovtang May 22 at 9:45
  • 4
    You can filter out "listening" ports with: lsof -ti:3000 -sTCP:LISTEN – Zlemini May 22 at 21:58

You can use lsof -i:3000.

That is "List Open Files". This gives you a list of the processes and which files and ports they use.

  • I'm on 10.5 lepard (updated Q). I don't know if that matters here, but lsof doesn't display ports. lsof -h (lsof 4.78) is too cryptic too me... – oma Oct 4 '10 at 12:58
  • 1
    Hmm. Don't know for sure on Leopard, but try (as root -- that's important, I think) lsof -i:3000. – Matt Gibson Oct 4 '10 at 13:19
  • root wasn't necessary. lsof -i:3000 works too... edit your answer and put it in there. More visible. I gave you an upvote, but the answer to user#. Thanks for helping! – oma Oct 4 '10 at 14:24
  • thanks for the naming explanation. Now I can remember the command because lsof = List Open Files :) – gion_13 Oct 17 at 10:01

In your .bash_profile, create a shortcut for terminate the 3000 process:

terminate(){
  lsof -P | grep ':3000' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9 
}

Then, call $terminate if it's blocked.

To forcefully kill a process like that, use the following command

lsof -n -i4TCP:3000 

Where 3000 is the port number the process is running at

this returns the process id(PID) and run

kill -9 "PID"

Replace PID with the number you get after running the first command

For Instance, if I want kill the process running on port 8080

lsof -P | grep ':3000' | awk '{print $2}'

This will give you just the pid, tested on MacOS.

  • 8
    on MAC kill all pids on port 3000: lsof -P | grep ':3000' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9 – mike clagg May 13 '13 at 21:18
  • 1
    can more than one process listen to the same port? – Kris May 15 '13 at 16:16
  • Our rails app spawns workers which are child processes, and I have to use this to kill orphaned workers – mike clagg May 15 '13 at 18:19
  • 1
    this also kills webbrowsers connecting to port – fjsj Apr 27 '15 at 15:06
  • 4
    Here is working one: lsof -n -iTCP:3407 -sTCP:LISTEN -n -l -P | grep 'LISTEN' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9 – bob May 23 '16 at 11:19

This single command line is easy to remember:

npx kill-port 3000

For a more powerful tool with search:

npx fkill-cli


PS: They use third party javascript packages

Sources: tweet | github

  • Can you share details on installing npx using brew? I tried installing it on my Mac High Sierra, 10.13.3 and it won't work. – realPK Oct 11 at 22:44
  • @realPK npx comes with npm which comes with node.js, so it's not a separated package. Just upgrade your node.js and your npm versions. – Bruno Lemos Oct 12 at 8:40
  • I do Java mostly, haven't exposed myself to Node yet. I found a different way of killing service running on port. TY for responding. – realPK Oct 13 at 22:58

One of the ways to kill a process on a port is to use the python library: freeport (https://pypi.python.org/pypi/freeport/0.1.9) . Once installed, simply:

# install freeport
pip install freeport

# Once freeport is installed, use it as follows
$ freeport 3000
Port 3000 is free. Process 16130 killed successfully
  • 7
    That's, by far, NOT the simplest way. The upvoted replies don't require you to download and install anything. – Greg Pasquariello May 25 '16 at 19:20
  • 4
    When the prerequisites are met this is so simple and easy to remember. We have a different definition of "simplest" and this answer is perfectly valid and appropriate. Maybe it's just missing the instructions to install freeport with pip. – Cyril Duchon-Doris Jul 19 '17 at 15:18
  • under the hood, freeport is just a wrapper that calls lsof -t -i:3000.. seems unnecessary. – Corey Goldberg Nov 16 at 17:01
  • This solution is not the easiest, but it complies 100% with what the OP asked... So it is in deed valid AF – danielrvt Nov 21 at 15:11

Execute in command line on OS-X El Captain:

kill -kill `lsof -t -i tcp:3000`

Terse option of lsof returns just the PID.

Find the open connection

lsof -i -P | grep -i "listen"

Kill by process ID

kill -9 'PID'

To view the processes blocking the port:

netstat -vanp tcp | grep 3000

To Kill the processes blocking the port:

kill $(lsof -t -i :3000)

  • This won't work on a Mac machine, returns the following: kill: usage: kill [-s sigspec | -n signum | -sigspec] pid | jobspec ... or kill -l [sigspec] It will, however, work in most linux distros – Milan Velebit Sep 19 at 12:08
  • @MilanVelebit Actually it works perfectly in my Mac machine (Sierra). It works fine if your port 3000 is occupied. However if no processes is blocking the port, then you will get kill: not enough arguments error. – Henry Sep 19 at 14:24
  • That's just weird, I've two Macs (both High Sierra tho), I remember running those commands on both of them (old habits) and I know for certain that they don't run. I've just tried it again on my machine, knowing that the port is occupied, same error. :/ – Milan Velebit Sep 19 at 14:33
  • Did you get a valid PID on running netstat -vanp tcp | grep 3000, for your port that's occupied? – Henry Sep 19 at 14:46
  • 1
    I tried it in both bash and zsh shell. Works fine for me. Not sure why it's not working for you. May be some thing to with High Sierra? I have no idea :/ – Henry Sep 19 at 15:27

Possible ways to achieve this:

top

The top command is the traditional way to view your system’s resource usage and see the processes that are taking up the most system resources. Top displays a list of processes, with the ones using the most CPU at the top.

ps

The ps command lists running processes. The following command lists all processes running on your system:

ps -A

You could also pipe the output through grep to search for a specific process without using any other commands. The following command would search for the Firefox process:

ps -A | grep firefox

The most common way of passing signals to a program is with the kill command.

kill PID_of_target_process

lsof

List of all open files and the processes that opened them.

lsof -i -P | grep -i "listen"
kill -9 PID

or

 lsof -i tcp:3000 

Find and kill:

This single command line is easy and works correctly.

kill -9 $(lsof -ti tcp:3000)

Add to ~/.bash_profile:

function killTcpListen () {
  kill -QUIT $(sudo lsof -sTCP:LISTEN -i tcp:$1 -t)
}

Then source ~/.bash_profile and run

killTcpListen 8080

Using sindresorhus's fkill tool, you can do this:

$ fkill :3000

TL;DR:

lsof -ti tcp:3000 -sTCP:LISTEN | xargs kill

If you're in a situation where there are both clients and servers using the port, e.g.:

$ lsof -i tcp:3000
COMMAND     PID         USER   FD   TYPE             DEVICE SIZE/OFF NODE NAME
node       2043 benjiegillam   21u  IPv4 0xb1b4330c68e5ad61      0t0  TCP localhost:3000->localhost:52557 (ESTABLISHED)
node       2043 benjiegillam   22u  IPv4 0xb1b4330c8d393021      0t0  TCP localhost:3000->localhost:52344 (ESTABLISHED)
node       2043 benjiegillam   25u  IPv4 0xb1b4330c8eaf16c1      0t0  TCP localhost:3000 (LISTEN)
Google    99004 benjiegillam  125u  IPv4 0xb1b4330c8bb05021      0t0  TCP localhost:52557->localhost:3000 (ESTABLISHED)
Google    99004 benjiegillam  216u  IPv4 0xb1b4330c8e5ea6c1      0t0  TCP localhost:52344->localhost:3000 (ESTABLISHED)

then you probably don't want to kill both.

In this situation you can use -sTCP:LISTEN to only show the pid of processes that are listening. Combining this with the -t terse format you can automatically kill the process:

lsof -ti tcp:3000 -sTCP:LISTEN | xargs kill

I made a little function for this, add it to your rc file (.bashrc, .zshrc or whatever)

function kill-by-port {
  if [ "$1" != "" ]
  then
    kill -9 $(lsof -ni tcp:"$1" | awk 'FNR==2{print $2}')
  else
    echo "Missing argument! Usage: kill-by-port $PORT"
  fi
}

then you can just type kill-by-port 3000 to kill your rails server (substituting 3000 for whatever port it's running on)

failing that, you could always just type kill -9 $(cat tmp/pids/server.pid) from the rails root directory

You should try this, This technique is OS Independent.

In side your application there is a folder called tmp, inside that there is an another folder called pids. That file contains the server pid file. Simply delete that file. port automatically kill itself.

I think this is the easy way.

Here's a helper bash function to kill multiple processes by name or port

fkill() {
  for i in $@;do export q=$i;if [[ $i == :* ]];then lsof -i$i|sed -n '1!p';
  else ps aux|grep -i $i|grep -v grep;fi|awk '{print $2}'|\
  xargs -I@ sh -c 'kill -9 @&&printf "X %s->%s\n" $q @';done
}

Usage:

$ fkill [process name] [process port]

Example:

$ fkill someapp :8080 node :3333 :9000

Try using Ctrl+C instead of Ctrl+Z to terminate previously running app.

Else you can find the process running on port 3000 by running [sudo] lsof -i :3000

Then kill the process kill -9 <PID>

Find PID and kill the process.

lsof -ti:3000 | xargs kill

you can use command

lsof -h

usage of this command to find port is

-i i   select by IPv[46] address: [46][proto][@host|addr][:svc_list|port_list]

In your case enter

lsof -i :3000
  • This brings nothing new to the thread. – Emile Bergeron Jun 21 at 14:16

If nothing of the above works try:

lsof -n -i4TCP:3000

Step 1: Find server which are running: ps aux | grep puma Step 2: Kill those server Kill -9 [server number]

you can also change the config on the server port (config/puma.rb) line 12.

$ port ENV.fetch("PORT") { 3000 }

to

$ port ENV.fetch("PORT") { 3001 }

or any specific port you deem appropriate. this avoids the need to go on a scavenger hunt for the processes. you can always reboot your computer. also when you initiate the server on another port, it will normally kill the first server you had open.

  • this does not solve the problem though? it just defers it till later. and you cant expect people to restart there computer every time a port get locks when you can just get the PID and kill it – Joe Warner Oct 11 at 16:44

You should try this code using the terminal:

$ killall -9 ruby

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