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I'm learning GCC inline assembler under under ARM on a 64-bit Aarch64 device. I'm seeing an error message I don't quite understand. The error message in from GCC's inline assembler:

$ gcc -DNDEBUG -g3 -O1 -march=armv8-a+crc+crypto test.cc -o test.exe
/tmp/ccCHOWrn.s: Assembler messages:
/tmp/ccCHOWrn.s:19: Error: invalid use of vector register at operand 1 -- `pmull v0,v0,v0'

The sample program simply tries to exercise the polynomial multiply:

$ cat test.cc 
#include <arm_neon.h>
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    uint64x2_t r = {0,0}, a = {2,4};
    __asm__ __volatile__
    (
        "pmull %0, %1, %1;"
        : "=w" (r)
        : "w" (a), "w" (a)
        : "cc"
    );

    return (int)r[0];
}

The "w" is an Aarch64 machine constraint. In this case, its described as "Floating point or SIMD vector register", which seems to be what I want.

The uint64x2_t type is typically used with ARM intrinsics. But its a 128-bit type and aligned for SIMD coprocessor, so it seemed like a good choice for the sample.

The device is a LeMaker HiKey with a Linaro image and GCC 4.9.2 compiler. It looks like this bug was fixed a couple of years ago, but I'm not sure if its related: fbb ftbfs on arm64.

I have two questions:

  • What does the error mean, and how can I fix it?
  • Is there an intrinsic for pmull and pmull2?

I tried adding the arrangement specifiers, but I'm not surprised it did not work since I don't know the syntax:

$ gcc -DNDEBUG -g3 -O1 -march=armv8-a+crc+crypto test.cc -o test.exe
test.cc: In function ‘int main(int, char**)’:
test.cc:8:15: error: expected ‘)’ before numeric constant
      : "=w" (r.1q)
               ^
test.cc:8:15: error: expected ‘)’ before numeric constant
test.cc:9:6: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘:’ token
      : "w" (a.1d), "w" (a.1d)
      ^
test.cc:9:6: error: expected primary-expression before ‘:’ token

I also tried adding double percent signs (i.e., %%0 and %%1) since the assembler was having trouble with .att_stntax and .intel_syntax:

$ gcc -DNDEBUG -g3 -O1 -march=armv8-a+crc+crypto test.cc -o test.exe
/tmp/ccPpnvUP.s: Assembler messages:
/tmp/ccPpnvUP.s:19: Error: operand 1 should be a SIMD vector register -- `pmull %0,%1,%1'

1 Answer 1

2

What does the error mean, and how can I fix it?

I guess the error means a constraint violation occurred. It looks like the following does the trick:

$ cat test.cc
#include <arm_neon.h>
#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  uint64x2_t r = {0,0}, a = {2,4};
  __asm__ __volatile__
    (
     "pmull %0.1q, %1.1d, %1.1d;"
     : "=w" (r)
     : "w" (a[0]), "w" (a[1])
     : "cc"
     );

  fprintf(stdout, "%d, %d\n", r[0], r[1]);
  return 0;
}

And:

$ gcc -march=armv8-a+crc+crypto test.cc -o test.exe 
$ ./test.exe 
4, 0

And:

$ gdb -batch -ex 'disassemble main' ./test.exe 
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00000000004005f0 <+0>: stp x29, x30, [sp,#-64]!
   0x00000000004005f4 <+4>: mov x29, sp
   0x00000000004005f8 <+8>: str w0, [x29,#28]
   0x00000000004005fc <+12>:    str x1, [x29,#16]
   0x0000000000400600 <+16>:    movi    v0.4s, #0x0
   0x0000000000400604 <+20>:    mov x0, v0.d[0]
   0x0000000000400608 <+24>:    mov x1, v0.d[1]
   0x000000000040060c <+28>:    fmov    d0, x0
   0x0000000000400610 <+32>:    mov v0.d[1], x1
   0x0000000000400614 <+36>:    str q0, [x29,#48]
   0x0000000000400618 <+40>:    ldr q0, 0x4006a0
   0x000000000040061c <+44>:    mov x0, v0.d[0]
   0x0000000000400620 <+48>:    mov x1, v0.d[1]
   0x0000000000400624 <+52>:    fmov    d0, x0
   0x0000000000400628 <+56>:    mov v0.d[1], x1
   0x000000000040062c <+60>:    str q0, [x29,#32]
   0x0000000000400630 <+64>:    ldr x0, [x29,#32]
   0x0000000000400634 <+68>:    ldr x1, [x29,#40]
   0x0000000000400638 <+72>:    fmov    d0, x0
   0x000000000040063c <+76>:    fmov    d1, x1
   0x0000000000400640 <+80>:    pmull   v0.1q, v0.1d, v0.1d
   0x0000000000400644 <+84>:    mov x0, v0.d[0]
   0x0000000000400648 <+88>:    mov x1, v0.d[1]
   0x000000000040064c <+92>:    fmov    d0, x0
   0x0000000000400650 <+96>:    mov v0.d[1], x1
   0x0000000000400654 <+100>:   str q0, [x29,#48]
   0x0000000000400658 <+104>:   adrp    x0, 0x410000
   0x000000000040065c <+108>:   add x0, x0, #0x9f0
   0x0000000000400660 <+112>:   ldr x4, [x0]
   0x0000000000400664 <+116>:   ldr x1, [x29,#48]
   0x0000000000400668 <+120>:   ldr x2, [x29,#56]
   0x000000000040066c <+124>:   adrp    x0, 0x400000
   0x0000000000400670 <+128>:   add x0, x0, #0x748
   0x0000000000400674 <+132>:   mov x3, x2
   0x0000000000400678 <+136>:   mov x2, x1
   0x000000000040067c <+140>:   mov x1, x0
   0x0000000000400680 <+144>:   mov x0, x4
   0x0000000000400684 <+148>:   bl  0x4004a0 <fprintf@plt>
   0x0000000000400688 <+152>:   mov w0, #0x0                    // #0
   0x000000000040068c <+156>:   ldp x29, x30, [sp],#64
   0x0000000000400690 <+160>:   ret
End of assembler dump.

Is there an intrinsic for pmull and pmull2?

It looks like there are some intrinsics:

$ gcc -march=armv8-a+crc+crypto -E test.cc | grep -B 4 pmull
__extension__ static __inline poly16x8_t __attribute__ ((__always_inline__))
vmull_high_p8 (poly8x16_t a, poly8x16_t b)
{
  poly16x8_t result;
  __asm__ ("pmull2 %0.8h,%1.16b,%2.16b"
--
__extension__ static __inline poly16x8_t __attribute__ ((__always_inline__))
vmull_p8 (poly8x8_t a, poly8x8_t b)
{
  poly16x8_t result;
  __asm__ ("pmull %0.8h, %1.8b, %2.8b"
--
static __inline poly128_t
vmull_p64 (poly64_t a, poly64_t b)
{
  return
    __builtin_aarch64_crypto_pmulldi_ppp (a, b);
--

static __inline poly128_t
vmull_high_p64 (poly64x2_t a, poly64x2_t b)
{
  return __builtin_aarch64_crypto_pmullv2di_ppp (a, b);
1
  • In other words, if you ask the compiler for a SIMD register, it'll give you a SIMD register; it's still up to you to to specify the rest of the instruction appropriately - the syntax certainly isn't the most obvious, with the datatype being an inherent part of the instruction that you're forced to specify on all the operands, rather than on the mnemonic as you might imagine (I remember early Apple assemblers implemented their own syntax which did use the latter form, to much confusion). Jul 25, 2016 at 23:37

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