53

I want to inspect the assembly output of applying boost::variant in my code in order to see which intermediate calls are optimized away.

When I compile the following example (with GCC 5.3 using g++ -O3 -std=c++14 -S), it seems as if the compiler optimizes away everything and directly returns 100:

(...)
main:
.LFB9320:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    $100, %eax
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
(...)

#include <boost/variant.hpp>

struct Foo
{
    int get() { return 100; }
};

struct Bar
{
    int get() { return 999; }
};

using Variant = boost::variant<Foo, Bar>;


int run(Variant v)
{
    return boost::apply_visitor([](auto& x){return x.get();}, v);
}
int main()
{
    Foo f;
    return run(f);
}

However, the full assembly output contains much more than the above excerpt, which to me looks like it is never called. Is there a way to tell GCC/clang to remove all that "noise" and just output what is actually called when the program is ran?


full assembly output:

    .file   "main1.cpp"
    .section    .rodata.str1.8,"aMS",@progbits,1
    .align 8
.LC0:
    .string "/opt/boost/include/boost/variant/detail/forced_return.hpp"
    .section    .rodata.str1.1,"aMS",@progbits,1
.LC1:
    .string "false"
    .section    .text.unlikely._ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v,"axG",@progbits,_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v,comdat
.LCOLDB2:
    .section    .text._ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v,"axG",@progbits,_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v,comdat
.LHOTB2:
    .p2align 4,,15
    .weak   _ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v
    .type   _ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v, @function
_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v:
.LFB1197:
    .cfi_startproc
    subq    $8, %rsp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    movl    $_ZZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_vE19__PRETTY_FUNCTION__, %ecx
    movl    $49, %edx
    movl    $.LC0, %esi
    movl    $.LC1, %edi
    call    __assert_fail
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE1197:
    .size   _ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v, .-_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v
    .section    .text.unlikely._ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v,"axG",@progbits,_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v,comdat
.LCOLDE2:
    .section    .text._ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v,"axG",@progbits,_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_v,comdat
.LHOTE2:
    .section    .text.unlikely._ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v,"axG",@progbits,_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v,comdat
.LCOLDB3:
    .section    .text._ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v,"axG",@progbits,_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v,comdat
.LHOTB3:
    .p2align 4,,15
    .weak   _ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v
    .type   _ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v, @function
_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v:
.LFB9757:
    .cfi_startproc
    subq    $8, %rsp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    movl    $_ZZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_vE19__PRETTY_FUNCTION__, %ecx
    movl    $39, %edx
    movl    $.LC0, %esi
    movl    $.LC1, %edi
    call    __assert_fail
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE9757:
    .size   _ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v, .-_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v
    .section    .text.unlikely._ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v,"axG",@progbits,_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v,comdat
.LCOLDE3:
    .section    .text._ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v,"axG",@progbits,_ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v,comdat
.LHOTE3:
    .section    .text.unlikely,"ax",@progbits
.LCOLDB4:
    .text
.LHOTB4:
    .p2align 4,,15
    .globl  _Z3runN5boost7variantI3FooJ3BarEEE
    .type   _Z3runN5boost7variantI3FooJ3BarEEE, @function
_Z3runN5boost7variantI3FooJ3BarEEE:
.LFB9310:
    .cfi_startproc
    subq    $8, %rsp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    movl    (%rdi), %eax
    cltd
    xorl    %edx, %eax
    cmpl    $19, %eax
    ja  .L7
    jmp *.L9(,%rax,8)
    .section    .rodata
    .align 8
    .align 4
.L9:
    .quad   .L30
    .quad   .L10
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .quad   .L7
    .text
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L7:
    call    _ZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_v
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L30:
    movl    $100, %eax
.L8:
    addq    $8, %rsp
    .cfi_remember_state
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
    ret
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L10:
    .cfi_restore_state
    movl    $999, %eax
    jmp .L8
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE9310:
    .size   _Z3runN5boost7variantI3FooJ3BarEEE, .-_Z3runN5boost7variantI3FooJ3BarEEE
    .section    .text.unlikely
.LCOLDE4:
    .text
.LHOTE4:
    .globl  _Z3runN5boost7variantI3FooI3BarEEE
    .set    _Z3runN5boost7variantI3FooI3BarEEE,_Z3runN5boost7variantI3FooJ3BarEEE
    .section    .text.unlikely
.LCOLDB5:
    .section    .text.startup,"ax",@progbits
.LHOTB5:
    .p2align 4,,15
    .globl  main
    .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB9320:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    $100, %eax
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE9320:
    .size   main, .-main
    .section    .text.unlikely
.LCOLDE5:
    .section    .text.startup
.LHOTE5:
    .section    .rodata
    .align 32
    .type   _ZZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_vE19__PRETTY_FUNCTION__, @object
    .size   _ZZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_vE19__PRETTY_FUNCTION__, 58
_ZZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIvEET_vE19__PRETTY_FUNCTION__:
    .string "T boost::detail::variant::forced_return() [with T = void]"
    .align 32
    .type   _ZZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_vE19__PRETTY_FUNCTION__, @object
    .size   _ZZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_vE19__PRETTY_FUNCTION__, 57
_ZZN5boost6detail7variant13forced_returnIiEET_vE19__PRETTY_FUNCTION__:
    .string "T boost::detail::variant::forced_return() [with T = int]"
    .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu 5.3.0-3ubuntu1~14.04) 5.3.0 20151204"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits
  • 2
    gcc does not generate useless code just because it has nothing better to do. All of that "noise" is needed in order to properly build and link C++ source: all of the boost's baggage's RTTI, etc... If you want to get rid of all that noise, don't use boost. – Sam Varshavchik Jul 24 '16 at 12:45
  • 2
    I believe you can have a look at how Godbolt calls gcc and cleans the remaining noise – phuclv Jul 24 '16 at 12:46
  • 2
    So, write a simple Perl script to strip out the unwanted fluff. – Sam Varshavchik Jul 24 '16 at 13:12
  • 4
    @Sam: A lot of the labels, like .LCOLDE3: / .LHOTE3: are pretty much pure noise. I don't think they affect the object file, not even the symbol table or other metadata. (And yes, stripping it out is a solved problem: the scripts behind godbolt.org are open source on github). I'd also second the recommendation for gcc.godbolt.org (with -O3 -Wall -Wextra -march=...) for looking at code. But remember, when you want to just look at the asm, leave out the main() and calling it with compile-time constants, so you can just look at the code for dealing with a function arg. – Peter Cordes Jul 24 '16 at 13:12
  • 2
    g++ -g -O3 -std=c++14 -c test.cc -o test.o && objdump -dS test.o – Leandros Jul 24 '16 at 13:42
70

Stripping out the .cfi directives, unused labels, and comment lines is a solved problem: the scripts behind Matt Godbolt's compiler explorer are open source on its github project. It can even do colour highlighting to match source lines to asm lines (using the debug info).

You can set it up locally so you can feed it files that are part of your project with all the #include paths and so on (using -I/...). And so you can use it on private source code that you don't want to send out over the Internet.

Matt Godbolt's CppCon2017 talk “What Has My Compiler Done for Me Lately? Unbolting the Compiler's Lid” shows how to use it (it's pretty self-explanatory but has some neat features if you read the docs on github), and also how to read x86 asm, with a gentle introduction to x86 asm itself for total beginners, and to looking at compiler output. He goes on to show some neat compiler optimizations (e.g. for dividing by a constant), and what kind of functions give useful asm output for looking at optimized compiler output (function args, not int a = 123;).


With plain gcc/clang (not g++), -fno-asynchronous-unwind-tables avoids .cfi directives. Possibly also useful: -fno-exceptions -fno-rtti -masm=intel. Make sure to omit -g.

Copy/paste this for local use:

g++ -fno-asynchronous-unwind-tables -fno-exceptions -fno-rtti -fverbose-asm \
    -Wall -Wextra  foo.cpp   -O3 -masm=intel -S -o- | less

But really, I'd recommend just using Godbolt directly (online or set it up locally)! You can quickly flip between versions of gcc and clang to see if old or new compilers do something dumb. (Or what ICC does, or even what MSVC does.) There's even ARM / ARM64 gcc 6.3, and various gcc for PowerPC, MIPS, AVR, MSP430. (It can be interesting to see what happens on a machine where int is wider than a register, or isn't 32-bit. Or on a RISC vs. x86).

For C instead of C++, use -xc -std=gnu11 or something; the compiler explorer site only provides g++ / clang++, not gcc / clang. (Or you can use C mode in the language dropdown, but that has a different selection of compilers that's mostly more limited. And it resets your source pane so it's more of an ordeal to flip between C and C++.)


Useful compiler options for making asm for human consumption:

  • Remember, your code only has to compile, not link: passing a pointer to an external function like void ext(int*p) is a good way to stop something from optimizing away. You only need a prototype for it, with no definition so the compiler can't inline it or make any assumptions about what it does.

  • I'd recommend using -O3 -Wall -Wextra -fverbose-asm -march=haswell) for looking at code. (-fverbose-asm can just make the source look noisy, though, when all you get are numbered temporaries as names for the operands.) When you're fiddling with the source to see how it changes the asm, you definitely want compiler warnings enabled. You don't want to waste time scratching your head over the asm when the explanation is that you did something that deserves a warning in the source.

  • To see how the calling convention works, you often want to look at caller and callee without inlining.

    You can use __attribute__((noinline,noclone)) foo_t foo(bar_t x) { ... } on a definition, or compile with gcc -O3 -fno-inline-functions -fno-inline-functions-called-once -fno-inline-small-functions to disable inlining. (But those command line options don't disable cloning a function for constant-propagation.) See From compiler perspective, how is reference for array dealt with, and, why passing by value(not decay) is not allowed? for an example.

    Or if you just want to see how functions pass / receive args of different types, you could use different names but the same prototype so the compiler doesn't have a definition to inline. This works with any compiler.

  • -ffast-math will get many libm functions to inline, some to a single instruction (esp. with SSE4 available for roundsd). Some will inline with just -fno-math-errno, or other "safer" parts of -ffast-math, without the parts that allow the compiler to round differently. If you have FP code, definitely look at it with/without -ffast-math. If you can't safely enable any of -ffast-math in your regular build, maybe you'll get an idea for a safe change you can make in the source to allow the same optimization without -ffast-math.

  • -O3 -fno-tree-vectorize will optimize without auto-vectorizing, so you can get full optimization without if you want to compare with -O2 (which doesn't enable autovectorization on gcc, but does on clang).
  • clang unrolls loops by default, so -funroll-loops can be useful in complex functions. You can get a sense of "what the compiler did" without having to wade through the unrolled loops. (gcc enables -funroll-loops with -fprofile-use, but not with -O3). (This is a suggestion for human-readable code, not for code that would run faster.)
  • Definitely enable some level of optimization, unless you specifically want to know what -O0 did. Its "predictable debug behaviour" requirement makes the compiler store/reload everything between every C statement, so you can modify C variables with a debugger and even "jump" to a different source line within the same function, and have execution continue as if you did that in the C source. -O0 output is so noisy with stores/reloads (and so slow) not just from lack of optimization, but forced de-optimization to support debugging.

To get a mix of source and asm, use gcc -Wa,-adhln -c -g foo.c | less to pass extra options to as. (More discussion of this in a blog post, and another blog.). Note that the output of this isn't valid assembler input, because the C source is there directly, not as an assembler comment. So don't call it a .s. A .lst might make sense if you want to save it to a file.

Godbolt's color highlighting serves a similar purpose, and is great at helping you see when multiple non-contiguous asm instructions come from the same source line. I haven't used that gcc listing command at all, so IDK how well it does, and how easy it is for the eye to see, in that case.

I like the high code density of godbolt's asm pane, so I don't think I'd like having source lines mixed in. At least not for simple functions. Maybe with a function that was too complex to get a handle on the overall structure of what the asm does...


And remember, when you want to just look at the asm, leave out the main() and the compile-time constants. You want to see the code for dealing with a function arg in a register, not for the code after constant-propagation turns it into return 42, or at least optimizes away some stuff.

Removing static and/or inline from functions will produce a stand-alone definition for them, as well as a definition for any callers, so you can just look at that.

Don't put your code in a function called main(). gcc knows that main is special and assumes it will only be called once, so it marks it as "cold" and optimizes it less.


The other thing you can do: If you did make a main(), you can run it and use a debugger. stepi (si) steps by instruction. See the bottom of the tag wiki for instructions. But remember that code might optimize away after inlining into main with compile-time-constant args.

__attribute__((noinline)) may help, on a function that you want to not be inlined. gcc will also make constant-propagation clones of functions, i.e. a special version with one of the args as a constant, for call-sites that know they're passing a constant. The symbol name will be .clone.foo.constprop_1234 or something in the asm output. You can use __attribute__((noclone)) to disable that, too.).


For example

If you want to see how the compiler multiplies two integers: I put the following code on the Godbolt compiler explorer to get the asm (from gcc -O3 -march=haswell -fverbose-asm) for the wrong way and the right way to test this.

// the wrong way, which people often write when they're used to creating a runnable test-case with a main() and a printf
// or worse, people will actually look at the asm for such a main()
int constants() { int a = 10, b = 20; return a * b; }
    mov     eax, 200  #,
    ret                     # compiles the same as  return 200;  not interesting

// the right way: compiler doesn't know anything about the inputs
// so we get asm like what would happen when this inlines into a bigger function.
int variables(int a, int b) { return a * b; }
    mov     eax, edi  # D.2345, a
    imul    eax, esi        # D.2345, b
    ret

(This mix of asm and C was hand-crafted by copy-pasting the asm output from godbolt into the right place. I find it's a good way to show how a short function compiles in SO answers / compiler bug reports / emails.)

  • 3
    You can disable CFI directives through -fno-asynchronous-unwind-tables. – edmz Jul 24 '16 at 19:03
11

You can always look at the generated assembly from the object file, instead of using the compilers assembly output. objdump comes to mind.

You can even tell objdump to intermix source with assembly, making it easier to figure out what source line corresponds to what instructions. Example session:

$ cat test.cc
int foo(int arg)
{
    return arg * 42;
}

$ g++ -g -O3 -std=c++14 -c test.cc -o test.o && objdump -dS -M intel test.o

test.o:     file format elf64-x86-64


Disassembly of section .text:

0000000000000000 <_Z3fooi>:
int foo(int arg)
{
    return arg + 1;
   0:   8d 47 01                lea    eax,[rdi+0x1]
}
   3:   c3                      ret    

Explanation of objdump flags:

  • -d disassembles all executable sections
  • -S intermixes assembly with source (-g required while compiling with g++)
  • -M intel choses intel syntax over ugly AT&T syntax (optional)
  • 3
    I like objdump -Mintel -drw when disassembling .o files, to show symbol names for relocations (-r) and not line-wrap the machine code for many-byte instructions. This is more readable sometimes, but can be much less readable because you lose the labels on branch targets, and some other info. (Agner Fog's objconv disassembler will make up labels for branch targets in disassembly). It also means you can't benefit from gcc -fverbose-asm. – Peter Cordes Jul 24 '16 at 13:57
  • Is there not an option to intermix assembly with source when having GCC generate an assembly listing? MSVC has this option (and several others, very handy). And the generated code is actually very clean and readable, once you scroll past the template and standard library goo at the top. – Cody Gray Jul 24 '16 at 18:10
  • @CodyGray: turns out it's possible with options to GNU as. See the update to my answer. I usually just look at godbolt with color highlighting enabled when I want to know that, though. The asm instructions associated with a source line aren't always contiguous... – Peter Cordes Jul 25 '16 at 0:54
  • 1
    Script for converting GNU -Mintel syntax to more exact NASM syntax, i.e. replace byte ptr with byte, and maybe a couple other minor things. – Peter Cordes Jul 26 '16 at 4:34
  • @PeterCordes that script is actively harmful, since it not only is incomplete, but also strips important information from disassembly, see my comment to that post. – Ruslan Oct 7 '17 at 22:04
8

I like to insert labels that I can easily grep out of the objdump output.

int main() {
    asm volatile ("interesting_part_begin%=:":);
    do_something();
    asm volatile ("interesting_part_end%=:":);
}

I haven't had a problem with this yet, but asm volatile can be very hard on a compiler's optimizer because it tends to leave such code untouched.

  • Are you sure you need volatile here? Have you noticed that the compiler optimizes away these labels without it? – Cody Gray Jul 24 '16 at 18:13
  • @CodyGray I haven't tried it. I would assume you would need the volatile since the optimizer will throw it away during DCE. – Tim Jul 24 '16 at 21:25
  • 1
    You don't actually need the volatile because GCC will assume it because the asm statement doesn't have an output operand. – Ross Ridge Jul 25 '16 at 2:57
  • @RossRidge Interesting. Is that documented behavior? – Tim Jul 25 '16 at 4:25
  • 4
    "asm statements that have no output operands, including asm goto statements, are implicitly volatile." gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Extended-Asm.html#Volatile – Ross Ridge Jul 25 '16 at 4:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.