56

If I run a process with ShellExecute (or in .net with System.Diagnostics.Process.Start()) the filename process to start doesn't need to be a full path.

If I want to start notepad, I can use

Process.Start("notepad.exe");

instead of

Process.Start(@"c:\windows\system32\notepad.exe");

because the direcotry c:\windows\system32 is part of the PATH environment variable.

how can I check if a file exists on the PATH without executing the process and without parsing the PATH variable?

System.IO.File.Exists("notepad.exe"); // returns false
(new System.IO.FileInfo("notepad.exe")).Exists; // returns false

but I need something like this:

System.IO.File.ExistsOnPath("notepad.exe"); // should return true

and

System.IO.File.GetFullPath("notepad.exe"); // (like unix which cmd) should return
                                           // c:\windows\system32\notepad.exe

Is there a predefined class to do this task available in the BCL?

  • While such a predefined class would be convenient (or is convenient, if it exists) isn't it only one more line to get the path then check exists()? You could have written it more quickly than asking the question. Special reason/need? Just wondering. – mickeyf Oct 4 '10 at 14:10
  • 3
    Yepp, should be very easy. But my conviction is that, if a task can be done with the existing library of a probramming language, I favor this way over reinventing the weel again and again. If there isn't smth available, I do it my own. – Jürgen Steinblock Oct 4 '10 at 16:10
54

I think there's nothing built-in, but you could do something like this with System.IO.File.Exists:

public static bool ExistsOnPath(string fileName)
{
    return GetFullPath(fileName) != null;
}

public static string GetFullPath(string fileName)
{
    if (File.Exists(fileName))
        return Path.GetFullPath(fileName);

    var values = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("PATH");
    foreach (var path in values.Split(Path.PathSeparator))
    {
        var fullPath = Path.Combine(path, fileName);
        if (File.Exists(fullPath))
            return fullPath;
    }
    return null;
}
  • 3
    If you are going to do this, I suggest turning these into Extension Methods...msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx – Aaron McIver Oct 4 '10 at 14:42
  • 6
    @Aaron: Are you sure you would see GetFullPath as extension method for string ? It would sound odd to me... Maybe could have sense for FileInfo... – digEmAll Oct 4 '10 at 14:57
  • Yes it would be strange when using a string. However I think it would make sense to wrap the above functionality from both methods into a single extension method titled ExistsOnPath which hangs off FileInfo as you mentioned. – Aaron McIver Oct 4 '10 at 15:04
  • 5
    @Aaron: For several reasons (e.g. why I have to pass through FileInfo if I only need a string...), I still prefer them as static methods, perhaps wrapped in Utilities static class, but I understand that could be arguable... Anyway, for the questioner, is easy to trasform the above code in Extension method ;) – digEmAll Oct 4 '10 at 15:28
  • 4
    This code is not portable to other platforms, on Unix you need to use Path.PathSeparator instead of hardcoding the semi colon. – Grzegorz Adam Hankiewicz Jul 3 '16 at 8:50
27

This is risky, there's a lot more to it than just searching the directories in the PATH. Try this:

 Process.Start("wordpad.exe");

The executable is stored in c:\Program Files\Windows NT\Accessories on my machine, that directory is not on the path.

The HKCR\Applications and HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths keys also play a role in finding executables. I'm fairly sure there are additional land-mines like this around, directory virtualization in 64-bit versions of Windows could trip you up for example.

To make this more reliable I think you need to pinvoke AssocQueryString(). Not sure, never had the need. The better approach is certainly to not have to ask the question.

  • the application that I want to query registers itself to the path (mysqldump.exe). If not, or if not installed, I want to disable the option to use mysqlbackup from a windows forms application. I just don't want to hard code the path to the file. – Jürgen Steinblock Oct 4 '10 at 17:07
  • It is very rare these days for installers to modify the PATH. Especially for a utility, check that first. I would just use a setting with Application scope and default to "" here. – Hans Passant Oct 4 '10 at 17:11
  • 4
    This was the subject of a recent Raymond Chen post. Hard to beat his blogging skills, other than I was first. Enjoy: blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2011/07/25/10189298.aspx – Hans Passant Aug 1 '11 at 0:52
15

Ok, a better way I think...

This uses the where command, which is available at least on Windows 7/Server 2003:

public static bool ExistsOnPath(string exeName)
{
    try
    {
        using (Process p = new Process())
        {
            p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
            p.StartInfo.FileName = "where";
            p.StartInfo.Arguments = exeName;
            p.Start();
            p.WaitForExit();
            return p.ExitCode == 0;
        }
    }
    catch(Win32Exception)
    {
        throw new Exception("'where' command is not on path");
    }
}

public static string GetFullPath(string exeName)
{
    try
    {
        using (Process p = new Process())
        {
            p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
            p.StartInfo.FileName = "where";
            p.StartInfo.Arguments = exeName;
            p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
            p.Start();
            string output = p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
            p.WaitForExit();

            if (p.ExitCode != 0)
                return null;

            // just return first match
            return output.Substring(0, output.IndexOf(Environment.NewLine));
        }
    }
    catch(Win32Exception)
    {
        throw new Exception("'where' command is not on path");
    }
}
6

Accepted answer states that there is nothing build-in, but this is not true. There is a standard WinAPI PathFindOnPath for doing this, it is available since Windows 2000.

  • Thanks for the update. Will keep it in mind. – Jürgen Steinblock Jun 21 '18 at 11:44
5

I tried out Dunc's "where" process and it works, but it's slow and resource-heavy and there's the slight danger of having an orphaned process.

I like Eugene Mala's tip about PathFindOnPath, so I fleshed that out as a complete answer. This is what I'm using for our custom in-house tool.

/// <summary>
/// Gets the full path of the given executable filename as if the user had entered this
/// executable in a shell. So, for example, the Windows PATH environment variable will
/// be examined. If the filename can't be found by Windows, null is returned.</summary>
/// <param name="exeName"></param>
/// <returns>The full path if successful, or null otherwise.</returns>
public static string GetFullPathFromWindows(string exeName)
{
    if (exeName.Length >= MAX_PATH)
        throw new ArgumentException($"The executable name '{exeName}' must have less than {MAX_PATH} characters.",
            nameof(exeName));

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(exeName, MAX_PATH);
    return PathFindOnPath(sb, null) ? sb.ToString() : null;
}

// https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/desktop/api/shlwapi/nf-shlwapi-pathfindonpathw
// https://www.pinvoke.net/default.aspx/shlwapi.PathFindOnPath
[DllImport("shlwapi.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError = false)]
static extern bool PathFindOnPath([In, Out] StringBuilder pszFile, [In] string[] ppszOtherDirs);

// from MAPIWIN.h :
private const int MAX_PATH = 260;
2

I'm after the same thing and I think the best option that I have right now is to use native call to CreateProcess to create a process suspended and watch for success; terminating the process immediately afterward. Terminating a suspended process should not incur any resource bleeding [citation needed :)]

I may not be able to figure out the path that actually got used but for a simple requirement as ExistsOnPath() it should do - till there's a better solution.

  • There could be some portions of code that will be executed even if you create suspended process. If you want to test if some malware or virus exists in system path - this method is very dangerous! – Eugene Mala Feb 7 at 5:38

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