57

For some reason I convert a time format like: 03:30 to seconds 3*3600 + 30*60, now. I wanna convert it back to its first (same) format up there. How could that be?

My attempt:

3*3600 + 30*60 = 12600 

12600 / 60 = 210 / 60 = 3.5, floor(3.5) = 3 = hour

Now, what about the minutes?

Considering the value can be like 19:00 or 02:51. I think you got the picture.

And by the way, how to convert 2:0 for example to 02:00 using RegEx?

15 Answers 15

125
$hours = floor($seconds / 3600);
$mins = floor($seconds / 60 % 60);
$secs = floor($seconds % 60);

If you want to get time format:

$timeFormat = sprintf('%02d:%02d:%02d', $hours, $mins, $secs);
  • 11
    And for remaining seconds: $secs = floor(($seconds - ($hours*3600( - ($mins*60)) ); – Attila Fulop Nov 20 '12 at 14:32
  • floor means round down. @Dewan159 – Cullub Feb 1 '16 at 15:27
  • 1
    $days = floor($seconds / 86400); $hours = floor($seconds % 86400 / 3600); for version with days – Jacek Słoma Oct 17 '17 at 5:24
  • instead of floor, you can use (int) ($seconds % 60) and so on, instead of floor(). Converting to an int simply removes decimal places, so -1.1 becomes -1. With floor(), -1.1 would become -2. – William Randokun May 18 '19 at 14:07
  • Note: if uses %02d, floor isn't necessary – Guilherme Nascimento Aug 1 '19 at 22:17
166

This might be simpler

gmdate("H:i:s", $seconds)

PHP gmdate

  • 28
    this works only for up to 24 hours, then it resets to 00:00:00 – gadelat Dec 11 '12 at 9:52
  • 9
    Then make it wrap: gmdate("H:i:s", $seconds%86400) – Synchro Jun 13 '13 at 8:37
  • @Synchro still its not working – Nadeem0035 Jul 27 '16 at 18:38
  • 1
    I love the simplicity in this for calculating video times from seconds! – Jeff Thomas Jun 26 '17 at 18:40
16

If the you know the times will be less than an hour, you could just use the date() or $date->format() functions.

$minsandsecs = date('i:s',$numberofsecs);

This works because the system epoch time begins at midnight (on 1 Jan 1970, but that's not important for you).

If it's an hour or more but less than a day, you could output it in hours:mins:secs format with `

$hoursminsandsecs = date('H:i:s',$numberofsecs);

For more than a day, you'll need to use modulus to calculate the number of days, as this is where the start date of the epoch would become relevant.

Hope that helps.

  • How would you 'use modulus to calculate the number of days'? – Tilman Köster Oct 6 '10 at 10:55
  • @tilman: In PHP, use the % sign for modulus. Other answers showed how to do modulus which is why I didn't. – Spudley Oct 6 '10 at 11:11
  • If you only show days and not years, cant you just subtract one day (in seconds) from your $numberofsecs? if ($numberofsecs > 86400) $numberofsec -= 86400; effectively starting on Jan 0th 1970. – Tilman Köster Oct 6 '10 at 17:04
  • 3
    Never ever do this!!! It is source of mysterious bugs. To understand why, try setting time zone to UTC+1 and print date(0). The result, will be 3:00. – Samuel Hapak Jul 20 '12 at 14:35
  • @SamuelHapak - heh. true. On the flip side, of course, I'd recommend everyone to always have their timezone set to UCT, due to the problems that arise with local timezones when your system clock respects daylight saving changes. (and why would you have it set to anything other than local time or UCT?) – Spudley Jul 20 '12 at 18:51
12

Maybe the simplest way is:

gmdate('H:i:s', $your_time_in_seconds);
  • won't work if timezone is not utc. – Evan Lee May 22 '16 at 4:59
10

Let $time be the time as number of seconds.

$seconds = $time % 60;
$time = ($time - $seconds) / 60;
$minutes = $time % 60;
$hours = ($time - $minutes) / 60;

Now the hours, minutes and seconds are in $hours, $minutes and $seconds respectively.

  • Thanks for this; how do you limit the result for $hours, $minutes, $seconds to only get whole numbers? – Jeff Solomon Jun 13 '14 at 21:32
8

Another solution that will give you the days, hours, minutes, and seconds for a passed-in seconds value:

function seconds_to_time($secs)
{
    $dt = new DateTime('@' . $secs, new DateTimeZone('UTC'));
    return array('days'    => $dt->format('z'),
                 'hours'   => $dt->format('G'),
                 'minutes' => $dt->format('i'),
                 'seconds' => $dt->format('s'));
}

print_r(seconds_to_time($seconds_value);

Extra logic will be needed for 'days' if the time is expected to be more than one year. Use str_pad() or ltrim() to add/remove leading zeros.

8

ITroubs answer doesn't deal with the left over seconds when you want to use this code to convert an amount of seconds to a time format like hours : minutes : seconds

Here is what I did to deal with this: (This also adds a leading zero to one-digit minutes and seconds)

$seconds = 3921; //example

$hours = floor($seconds / 3600);
$mins = floor(($seconds - $hours*3600) / 60);
$s = $seconds - ($hours*3600 + $mins*60);

$mins = ($mins<10?"0".$mins:"".$mins);
$s = ($s<10?"0".$s:"".$s); 

$time = ($hours>0?$hours.":":"").$mins.":".$s;

$time will contain "1:05:21" in this example.

7

If you were to hardcode it you would use modulus to extract the time as others suggested.

If you are returning the seconds from MySQL database, assuming you don't need the data in seconds format in your app, there is a much cleaner way to do it, you can use MySQL's SEC_TO_TIME and it will return time in hh:mm:ss format.

Eg.

SELECT SEC_TO_TIME(my_seconds_field) AS my_timestring;
3

something like this?

 if(is_numeric($time)){
$value = array(
  "years" => 0, "days" => 0, "hours" => 0,
  "minutes" => 0, "seconds" => 0,
);
if($time >= 31556926){
  $value["years"] = floor($time/31556926);
  $time = ($time%31556926);
}
if($time >= 86400){
  $value["days"] = floor($time/86400);
  $time = ($time%86400);
}
if($time >= 3600){
  $value["hours"] = floor($time/3600);
  $time = ($time%3600);
}
if($time >= 60){
  $value["minutes"] = floor($time/60);
  $time = ($time%60);
}
$value["seconds"] = floor($time);
return (array) $value;

}else{ return (bool) FALSE; }

grabbed from: http://www.ckorp.net/sec2time.php

  • The days portion ignores daylight saving, and the years portion ignores that and leap years. – Spudley Oct 4 '10 at 14:57
3

Sorry this is too late but maybe useful

function mediaTimeDeFormater($seconds)
{
    if (!is_numeric($seconds))
        throw new Exception("Invalid Parameter Type!");


    $ret = "";

    $hours = (string )floor($seconds / 3600);
    $secs = (string )$seconds % 60;
    $mins = (string )floor(($seconds - ($hours * 3600)) / 60);

    if (strlen($hours) == 1)
        $hours = "0" . $hours;
    if (strlen($secs) == 1)
        $secs = "0" . $secs;
    if (strlen($mins) == 1)
        $mins = "0" . $mins;

    if ($hours == 0)
        $ret = "$mins:$secs";
    else
        $ret = "$hours:$mins:$secs";

    return $ret;
}

echo mediaTimeDeFormater(216.064000);//3:36
2

Use modulo:

$hours = $time_in_seconds / 3600;
$minutes = ($time_in_seconds / 60) % 60;
  • i don't know .. it gives me this : 2 = h, 5.30 = m , when seconds are 9000 (2 hours+ 30 mins) – Dewan159 Oct 4 '10 at 15:31
2

just one small additional example

requested time in miliseconds

    // ms2time( (microtime(true) - ( time() - rand(0,1000000) ) ) );
    // return array
    function ms2time($ms){
        $return = array();
        // ms
        $return['ms'] = (int) number_format( ($ms - (int) $ms), 2, '', '');
        $seconds = (int) $ms;
        unset($ms);

        if ($seconds%60 > 0){
            $return['s'] = $seconds%60;
        } else {
            $return['s'] = 0;
        }

        if ( ($minutes = intval($seconds/60))){
            $return['m'] = $minutes;
        }

        if (isset($return['m'])){
            $return['h'] = intval($return['m'] / 60);
            $return['m']  = $return['m'] % 60; 
        }


        if (isset($return['h'])){
            $return['d'] = intval($return['h'] / 24);
            $return['h']  = $return['h'] % 24; 
        }

        if (isset($return['d']))
            $return['mo'] = intval($return['d'] / 30);

        foreach($return as $k=>$v){
            if ($v == 0)
                unset($return[$k]);
        }

        return $return;
    }

    // ms2time2string( (microtime(true) - ( time() - rand(0,1000000) ) ) );
    // return array     
    function ms2time2string($ms){
        $array = array(
            'ms' => 'ms',
            's'  => 'seconds',
            'm'  => 'minutes',
            'h'  => 'hours',
            'd'  => 'days',
            'mo' => 'month',
        );


        if ( ( $return = ms2time($ms) )  && count($ms) > 0){

            foreach($return as $key=>$data){
                $return[$key] = $data .' '.$array[$key];
            }

        }
        return implode(" ", array_reverse($return));
    }
2

Here is another way with leading '0' for all of them.

$secCount = 10000;
$hours = str_pad(floor($secCount / (60*60)), 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);
$minutes = str_pad(floor(($secCount - $hours*60*60)/60), 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);
$seconds = str_pad(floor($secCount - ($hours*60*60 + $minutes*60)), 2, '0', STR_PAD_LEFT);

It is an adaptation from the answer of Flaxious.

-2

If You want nice format like: 0:00:00 use str_pad() as @Gardner.

-6

1 day = 86400000 milliseconds.

DecodeTime(milliseconds/86400000,hr,min,sec,msec)

Ups! I was thinking in delphi, there must be something similar in all languages.

  • In many parts of the world, there are at least two days that do not have 86400 seconds. – Álvaro González Apr 5 '17 at 11:56

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