6

I find myself quite often in the following situation:

I have a user control which is bound to some data. Whenever the control is updated, the underlying data is updated. Whenever the underlying data is updated, the control is updated. So it's quite easy to get stuck in a never ending loop of updates (control updates data, data updates control, control updates data, etc.).

Usually I get around this by having a bool (e.g. updatedByUser) so I know whether a control has been updated programmatically or by the user, then I can decide whether or not to fire off the event to update the underlying data. This doesn't seem very neat.

Are there some best practices for dealing with such scenarios?

EDIT: I've added the following code example, but I think I have answered my own question...?

public partial class View : UserControl
{
    private Model model = new Model();

    public View()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public event EventHandler<Model> DataUpdated;

    public Model Model
    {
        get
        {
            return model;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value != null)
            {
                model = value;
                UpdateTextBoxes();
            }
        }
    }

    private void UpdateTextBoxes()
    {
        if (InvokeRequired)
        {
            Invoke(new Action(() => UpdateTextBoxes()));
        }
        else
        {
            textBox1.Text = model.Text1;
            textBox2.Text = model.Text2;
        }
    }

    private void textBox1_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        model.Text1 = ((TextBox)sender).Text;
        OnModelUpdated();
    }

    private void textBox2_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        model.Text2 = ((TextBox)sender).Text;
        OnModelUpdated();
    }

    private void OnModelUpdated()
    {
        DataUpdated?.Invoke(this, model);
    }
}

public class Model
{
    public string Text1 { get; set; }
    public string Text2 { get; set; }
}

public class Presenter
{
    private Model model;
    private View view;

    public Presenter(Model model, View view)
    {
        this.model = model;
        this.view = view;

        view.DataUpdated += View_DataUpdated;
    }

    public Model Model
    {
        get
        {
            return model;
        }
        set
        {
            model = value;
            view.Model = model;
        }
    }

    private void View_DataUpdated(object sender, Model e)
    {
        //This is fine.
        model = e;

        //This causes the circular dependency.
        Model = e;
    }
}
3
  • what UI framework are you using? WPF? UWP? Winforms? each have their own prefered method - but generally it comes down to different types of the MVC design pattern
    – gilmishal
    Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:14
  • @gilmishal Sorry, I forgot to mention Winforms. Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:16
  • I think if you show some code which create circular updating - will be more easily to find more suitable solution
    – Fabio
    Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:39

3 Answers 3

2

One option would be to stop the update in case the data didn't change since the last time. For example if the data were in form of a class, you could check if the data is the same instance as the last time the event was triggered and if that is the case, stop the propagation.

This is what many MVVM frameworks do to prevent raising PropertyChanged event in case the property didn't actually change:

private string _someProperty = "";
public string SomeProperty
{
    get
    {
        return _someProperty;
    }
    set
    {
        if ( _someProperty != value )
        {
           _someProperty = value;
           RaisePropertyChanged();
        }
    }
}

You can implement this concept similarly for Windows Forms.

3
  • This seems nice and simple. What about when my Property is actually a more complex class, itself with many properties? I suppose I would need to override Equals() and == in order to compare the individual fields. Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:26
  • @digital_fate No, you need to do a simple comparison, since you want to prevent the property-changed-event from firing, and that has nothing to do with the contents of the sub-property.
    – Maarten
    Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:33
  • In case the instance itself is the same and only sub-properties change, then you would need to do the comparison property by property. Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:39
1

What you're looking for is called Data Binding. It allows you to connect two or more properties, so that when one property changes others will be updated auto-magically.

In WinForms it's a little bit ugly, but works like a charm in cases such as yours. First you need a class which represents your data and implements INotifyPropertyChanged to notify the controls when data changes.

public class ViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{

    private string _textFieldValue;
    public string TextFieldValue {
        get
        {
            return _textFieldValue;
        }

        set
        {
            _textFieldValue = value;
            NotifyChanged();
        }
    }

    public void NotifyChanged()
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null) PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(null));
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
}

Than in your Form/Control you bind the value of ViewModel.TextFieldValue to textBox.Text. This means whenever value of TextFieldValue changes the Text property will be updated and whenever Text property changes TextFieldValue will be updated. In other words the values of those two properties will be the same. That solves the circular loops issue you're encountering.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public ViewModel ViewModel = new ViewModel();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        // Connect:  textBox1.Text <-> viewModel.TextFieldValue
        textBox1.DataBindings.Add("Text", ViewModel , "TextFieldValue");
    }
}

If you need to modify the values from outside of the Form/Control, simply set values of the ViewModel

form.ViewModel.TextFieldValue = "new value";

The control will be updated automatically.

2
  • This looks like what I need. If I have a property a bit more complex than a string, such as another class with several properties, am I correct in thinking this will only work if the property as a whole is set? For example, if I do the following: form.ViewModel.ComplexProperty.FirstProperty = "new value"; then the NotifyChanged() will not be fired because ComplexProperty was accessed via the Get accessor and not the Set accessor? Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 22:12
  • 1
    The type of ComplexProperty should implement INotifyPropertyChanged as well. Commented Jul 26, 2016 at 6:18
1

You should look into MVP - it is the preferred design pattern for Winforms UI. http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/14660/WinForms-Model-View-Presenter

using that design pattern gives you a more readable code in addition to allowing you to avoid circular events.

in order to actually avoid circular events, your view should only export a property which once it is set it would make sure the txtChanged_Event would not be called.

something like this:

public string UserName
    {
        get
        {
            return txtUserName.Text;
        }
        set
        {
            txtUserName.TextChanged -= txtUserName_TextChanged;
            txtUserName.Text = value;
            txtUserName.TextChanged += txtUserName_TextChanged;
        }
    }

or you can use a MZetko's answer with a private property

4
  • Why does it avoid circular events?
    – Maarten
    Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:31
  • I can still see the following situation: User updates View -> Presenter updates Model -> Model Updated -> Presenter updates View -> etc. Either I'm misunderstanding this pattern, or there needs to be some way for the Presenter or the View to know whether or not to fire an event? Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:43
  • 1
    well it separates the view from the underlying data, if implemented correctly it only updates the underlying data once a dataChanged event is called, and only then. In general, you are subscribing to different methods for the two different cases, and responding accordingly, look at the project in the referenced link - he is not getting a circular event problem.
    – gilmishal
    Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:47
  • wait, my bad, I will give you a better example
    – gilmishal
    Commented Jul 25, 2016 at 10:54

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