-7

I am implementing both async and normal versions of a function. I've already implemented async version. For the normal version I can copy-paste and replace usage of async function calls with their normal counter-parts. Or I can call the async version with Result as in follows.

First approach:

public int SomeTask(int param) 
{
   //Something going on
   return SomeOtherTask();
} 

public async Task<int> SomeTaskAsync(int param) 
{
   //Something going on (copy pasted)
   return await SomeOtherTaskAsync();    
} 

Second approach:

public int SomeTask(int param) 
{
   return SomeTaskAsync(param).Result;
} 

public async Task<int> SomeTaskAsync(int param) 
{
   //some function calls with await
} 

Is there a possible problem with second approach?

2

Performance will be impacted. How much is impossible to tell - you're the one with the code, you can do the profiling for your exact use case.

However, there's no point in making a sync version of the method that only calls Result - the user of your method can do the same thing. The problem is, it can be quite dangerous to do that anyway, especially when synchronization contexts are involved. Consider the sample code:

async void btnTest_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  await DoSomethingAsync();
}

async Task DoSomethingAsync()
{
  await Task.Delay(1000);
}

This works fine. Now, let's try your "sync" version:

async void btnTest_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  DoSomethingAsync().Result;
}

async Task DoSomethingAsync()
{
  await Task.Delay(1000);
}

Oops, you have a deadlock. The UI thread is waiting for DoSomethingAsync to finish, but DoSomethingAsync needs to finish executing on the UI thread. You can never assume that an async method will run if you wait for it synchronously.

Also, by using Result instead of await, you lose a lot of the exception handling capabilities. For example, the exception stack trace is going to be all messed up, and you'll need to handle exceptions thrown by both the method that creates the task and the Result call itself - the first will throw exceptions up to the point of the first await that actually has to wait, and the second for all the continuations. You never know which is which.

0

First, if you have a naturally-asynchronous operation, you should expose an asynchronous API. As Damien pointed out, the answer to "Should I expose synchronous wrappers for my asynchronous methods?" is "No".

One problem with these kinds of wrappers is that there is no pattern that works in all scenaros! I describe a variety of sync-over-async hacks in my article on Brownfield Async. Every one of them has drawbacks; as Luaan pointed out, the blocking hack has the possibility of deadlocks.

However, if you have a really good reason for doing this (i.e., your library historically has had synchronous methods, and you're adding asynchronous methods but want to keep the synchronous methods for backwards compatibility, at least for a version or two), then you can use the "boolean flag hack" as described in my article.

Stephen Toub showed me this trick a while ago. The idea is that the (private) implementation function takes a bool sync parameter, and if that is true, then the task it returns is guaranteed to be already completed. This avoids the deadlock problems with regular blocking:

private async Task<int> SomeTaskAsync(int param, bool sync)
{
  // Every `await` in your code needs to honor `sync`
  if (sync)
    return SomeOtherTask();
  else
    return await SomeOtherTaskAsync();
}

public int SomeTask(int param) 
{
  return SomeTaskAsync(param, sync: true).GetAwaiter().GetResult();
} 

public Task<int> SomeTaskAsync(int param) 
{
  return SomeTaskAsync(param, sync: false);
} 

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