9

In an embedded system with two separate RAM memory areas, I have two distinct heaps (one is a custom implementation from FreeRTOS in the lower memory area, another is the heap generated by GCC in the upper memory area) and I would like to be able to choose which heap new uses.

13

You could provide an operator new overload that accepts a second argument telling it which memory area to allocate memory from. You can give arguments to operator new by putting them in parenthesis before the type in your new-expression. This is usually used to new an object into already-allocated storage (since that's the overload provided by the standard library), but anything can be passed there and it will be passed on to operator new.

enum MemoryArea {
    LOWER,
    UPPER
};

void* operator new(std::size_t sz, MemoryArea seg) {
    if (seg == LOWER) {
        return allocateMemoryInLowerMemoryArea(sz);
    } else {
        return allocateMemoryInUpperMemoryArea(sz);
    }
}

void operator delete(void* p) {
    if (pointerIsInLowerMemoryArea(p)) {
        freeMemoryFromLowerMemoryArea(p);
    } else {
        freeMemoryFromUpperMemoryArea(p);
    }
}

int main() {
    Foo* p = new (LOWER) Foo;
    Foo* b = new (UPPER) Foo;
    delete p;
    delete b;
}
  • 1
    That's not placement new. Placement new instantiates an object in-place and does not allocate memory. – Captain Obvlious Jul 26 '16 at 19:28
  • @CaptainObvlious It's the same syntax as placement new, and uses the same mechanisms, but I suppose you're right. I'll re-word that bit. – Miles Budnek Jul 26 '16 at 19:30
  • 2
    "It's the same syntax " but not the same semantics which is more important. – Captain Obvlious Jul 26 '16 at 19:30
  • 2
    It looks like the standard does actually refer to this as a placement new-expression, regardless of what the operator new overload actually does with the parameters. See §[expr.new]/13. – Miles Budnek Jul 26 '16 at 19:51
  • 2
    The standard defines placement new-expression to be any new-expression for which a new-placement clause is provided. The new-placment clause is the parenthesized expression list before the type name in the new-expression. It's probably still true that this shouldn't be colloquially referred to as placement new, but it is technically correct. – Miles Budnek Jul 26 '16 at 20:13
-4

Edit: See accepted answer, this is incorrect - UseUpperMemoryNew would affect allocations of MyClass, not allocations within functions in MyClass. Leaving this around for learning / posterity / comments.

For the lower memory area, in global namespace

#include <new>
#undef new

void* operator new (std::size_t size) throw (std::bad_alloc) { ... }
void* operator new (std::size_t size, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) { ... }
void* operator new[] (std::size_t size) throw (std::bad_alloc) { ... }
void* operator new[] (std::size_t size, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) throw() { ... }
void operator delete (void* ptr) throw () { ... }
void operator delete (void* ptr, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) throw() { ... }
void operator delete[] (void* ptr) throw () { ... }
void operator delete[] (void* ptr, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) throw() { ... }

For the upper memory area,

void* new2 (std::size_t size) throw (std::bad_alloc) { ... }
void* new2 (std::size_t size, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) { ... }
void delete2 (void* ptr) throw () { ... }
void delete2 (void* ptr, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) throw() { ... }

#define UseUpperMemoryNew \
void* operator new (std::size_t size) throw (std::bad_alloc) { return new2(size); }\
void* operator new (std::size_t size, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) { return new2(size, nothrow_constant); }\
void* operator new[] (std::size_t size) throw (std::bad_alloc) { return new2(size); }\
void* operator new[] (std::size_t size, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) throw() { return new2(size, nothrow_constant); }\
void operator delete (void* ptr) throw () { delete2(ptr); }\
void operator delete (void* ptr, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) throw() { delete2(ptr, nothrow_constant); }\
void operator delete[] (void* ptr) throw () { delete2(ptr); }\
void operator delete[] (void* ptr, const std::nothrow_t& nothrow_constant) throw() { delete2(ptr, nothrow_constant); }

Then, lower memory is default, upper memory may be chosen at the class level:

class MyClass
{
public:
    UseUpperMemoryArea
    void someFunction(); // new operator use in this function uses upper memory area
};

I discovered that you may not redefine new outside of the global namespace - class-level overloading is the only option here.

  • 1
    FYI, the throw(...) exception specification is deprecated. – jaggedSpire Jul 26 '16 at 19:03
  • 1
    That's not how class-specific operator new overloads work. Your UseUpperMemoryNew overloads won't be used in MyClass, they will be used to allocate new MyClass objects. – Miles Budnek Jul 26 '16 at 19:07
  • 2
    If you're gonna do a self-answered post you're gonna need to do a bit better than this. – Captain Obvlious Jul 26 '16 at 19:15
  • Posting an incorrect, unaccepted answer to my own question revealed it's flaws, improved my code, and taught me a few new things. I'd call that doing pretty well. – Jacob Jennings Jul 26 '16 at 22:30
  • 1
    It might be an idea to move this to an "appendix" in the question body. – Bathsheba Jul 27 '16 at 7:05

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