What would be the best approach - regex or something else?

I have following array:

[
"b1:number/1",
"b1:number/1/chest/85",
"b1:number/1/height/175",
"b1:number/1/hip/90",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_2/m",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_1/m",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_3/s",
]

I need to take brand b1 from the entry starting "b1:" This should be parsed like:

{
    "number": 1,
    "category": "bottoms",
    "height": "175",
    "chest": 85,
    "brand": "b1",
    "hip": 90,
    "size_1": "m",
    "size_2": "m",
    "size_3": "s"
}

Edit: I need to parse only the data starting with "b1:number/". Incase of data like

[
"b1:another/somethingElse", //SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED
"b1:number/1",
"b1:number/1/chest/85",
"b1:number/1/height/175",
"b1:number/1/hip/90",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_2/m",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_1/m",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_3/s",
]
  • 1
    I think you mean JavaScript objects rather than "JSON objects". Unless you are intending to parse this and place it in a .json file. – Spencer Wieczorek Jul 27 '16 at 4:15
  • Are chest, height, hip, and category the only possibilities at the third level? And will chest/height/hip always appear before the category information? Your sample array is quite small. How many elements in the real data? – nnnnnn Jul 27 '16 at 4:18
  • At a particular api response, I just need to parse this above array. It varies only in values for different api calls. Basically the structure is similar. @nnnnnn – Nisha Jul 27 '16 at 4:22
  • OK, so no need to worry about making a super efficient algorithm as long as the output is correct? – nnnnnn Jul 27 '16 at 4:23
  • @nnnnnn I've edited the question. Only one response from one parsing. – Nisha Jul 27 '16 at 4:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

My idea was to use .reduce() to process each element in the array and add its values to an object. I .split() each item on the / character, then test how many pieces that produced in order to decide exactly what to do with it.

function processItem(item) {
  return item.reduce(function(a, v) {
    var parts = v.split("/");
    var b = parts[0].split(":");
    if (b[1] === "number") {
      switch(parts.length) {
        case 2:
          a[b[1]] = parts[1];
          a.brand = b[0];
          break;
        case 4:
          a[parts[2]] = +parts[3]; // note unary plus to convert to number
          break;
        case 6:
          if (!a[parts[2]])
            a[parts[2]] = parts[3];
          a[parts[4]] = parts[5];
          break;
      }
    }
    return a;
  }, {});
}

console.log(processItem([
    "b1:another/somethingElse",
    "b1:number/1",
    "b1:number/1/chest/85",
    "b1:number/1/height/175",
    "b1:number/1/hip/90",
    "b1:another/blah",
    "b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_2/m",
    "b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_1/m",
    "b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_3/s",
]));

  • Nice! Note the addition of "brand" in the question, though. – smarx Jul 27 '16 at 4:38
  • @smarx - Thanks. And yes, there always seems to be some extra requirement that wasn't mentioned at first...I'll edit... – nnnnnn Jul 27 '16 at 4:39
  • @Nisha - I added an if test to check for "number". Any further changes will be left as an exercise for the reader... – nnnnnn Jul 27 '16 at 7:09

In general, without a good description of the input format, there are going to be lots of assumptions baked into the code. Here are some assumptions I made that are worth calling out:

  1. There's only one "category" in the array.
  2. Properties not under "category" (i.e. "chest", "height", and "hip") are meant to be integers.
  3. Properties under category (e.g. "size_1" etc.) are strings.
  4. Anything with five or more segments is of the form in the input (looks like /category///). Optionally, you could test for split[2] == 'category' and do something else with non-matching strings.
  5. Every string starts with a 2-character prefix that is the "brand". Optionally, you grab everything up to the first colon or only look for that on certain lines.

Here's the code:

data = [
    "b1:number/1",
    "b1:number/1/chest/85",
    "b1:number/1/height/175",
    "b1:number/1/hip/90",
    "b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_2/m",
    "b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_1/m",
    "b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_3/s",
];

var properties = {};
properties.brand = data[0].substr(0, 2);

for (var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
    var split = data[i].split('/');
    var category = null;
    // Skip entries that don't have any real data
    if (split.length > 2) {
        if (split.length < 6) {
            // e.g. b1:number/1/chest/85
            properties[split[2]] = parseInt(split[3]);
        } else {
            // e.g. b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_1/m
            properties.category = split[3]; // e.g. bottoms
            properties[split[4]] = split[5]; // e.g. size_1, m
        }
    } else if (split[0].split(':')[1] === 'number') {
        properties.number = split[1];
    }
}

console.log(properties);

// Output:
// { brand: 'b1',
//   number: '1',
//   chest: 85,
//   height: 175,
//   hip: 90,
//   category: 'bottoms',
//   size_2: 'm',
//   size_1: 'm',
//   size_3: 's' }
  • The property "number" ? – Nisha Jul 27 '16 at 4:35
  • Very close to the requirement..but the number comes wrong if an extra data like "b1:somethingElse/abc" comes. Can we use a regex there for "number" and discard all others not starting with "b1:number/"? – Nisha Jul 27 '16 at 5:01

Without any regex i might do it as follows;

var data = [
"b1:number/1",
"b1:number/1/chest/85",
"b1:number/1/height/175",
"b1:number/1/hip/90",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_2/m",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_1/m",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_3/s",
"b1:notnumber/1/category/bottoms/size_4/xs"
],
 dataObj = data.map(e => e.split(":"))
               .map(e => ["brand",e[0]].concat(e[1].indexOf("number") === 0 ? e[1].split("/") :[]))
               .map(e => e.reduce((p,c,i,a) => i%2 === 0 ? (p[c] = a[i+1],p) : p,{}))
               .reduce((p,c) => Object.assign(p,c));
console.log(dataObj);

Explanation of the code:

.map(e => e.split(":"))

This will handle each element of the data array one by one, split the string items from ":" character and place each sub-string into a new array. So the input array will be converted into a 2D array like [["b1","number/1"],["b1","number/1/chest/85"],..., ["b1",notnumber/1/category/bottoms/size_4/xs"]]

.map(e => ["brand",e[0]].concat(e[1].indexOf("number") === 0 ? e[1].split("/") :[]))

This is sligtly complicated part. Each data array item is an array of two elements which are designated by e[0] and e[1] within the map functor. We will construct an array in which the items at even indices will be used for the target object's properties and items at odd indices will be used as the values. So we start with an array ["brand",e[0]] where e[0] is "b1" in this particular case. Then if the string at e[1] starts with "number" (e[1].indexOf("number") === 0) then we split the string by using the "/" character into an array. (e[1].split("/")) and get "number/1/category/bottoms/size_2/m" --> ["number", "1", "category", "bottoms", "size_2", "m"] but if it does not start with "number" then we use an empty array []. Finally we concatanate the two arrays obtained from e[0] and e[1]

.map(e => e.reduce((p,c,i,a) => i%2 === 0 ? (p[c] = a[i+1],p) : p,{}))

This is standard reduce operation on the array obtained at the above stage. We are reducing with a initial value (empty object) of {}. Every item at even index position (i%2 === 0) is added as a property to our initial object and the following property is added as a value for this property p[c] = a[i+1]. Then we return p to feed the next stage of the reduce iteration. ,p) : p

.reduce((p,c) => Object.assign(p,c));

Now that we have the objects per each item of the data array. We are left with consolidating them into one. Object.assign() is an ideal tool for this job.

And finally we have the result returned at the end of the chain.

  • Modified the code to handle the "notnumber condition" too. I hope it's fine. @Nisha – Redu Jul 27 '16 at 5:52
  • I got { brand: 'b1' } as the response of your code. Is something missed? – Nisha Jul 27 '16 at 6:19
  • Strange should work fine... It seems working fine both on Chrome, Opera and FF. What browser are you using..? @Nisha – Redu Jul 27 '16 at 6:27
  • Am checking the console. – Nisha Jul 27 '16 at 6:48
  • It is working @redu. Only thing is that the code is not self explanatory. Hence going with the other answer. – Nisha Jul 27 '16 at 9:26

This is pure PHP approach:

<?php

$arr_ = [
"number/1",
"number/1/chest/85",
"number/1/height/175",
"number/1/hip/90",
"number/1/category/bottoms/size_2/m",
"number/1/category/bottoms/size_1/m",
"number/1/category/bottoms/size_3/s",
];
$arr_values = array();

for($i=0; $i <count($arr_);  $i++){

    $arr_data = explode("/", $arr_[$i]);

    for($j=0; $j<count($arr_data); $j++){
        if(!is_null($arr_data[($j + 1)])){
            if(!in_array(array($arr_data[$j] => $arr_data[$j + 1]), $arr_values)){
                array_push($arr_values, array($arr_data[$j] => $arr_data[($j + 1)]));
            }
        }
        $j++;
    }
}
echo json_encode($arr_values);

OUTPUT:

[{"number":"1"},{"chest":"85"},{"height":"175"},{"hip":"90"},{"category":"bottoms"},{"size_2":"m"},{"size_1":"m"},{"size_3":"s"}]
  • I wanted JS. Sorry not php. – Nisha Jul 27 '16 at 5:04

Your input data and outcome have a pattern, so this is a transform operation. As the input is pretty simple, you can simply use split function to cut into pieces and then build the output.

Note that you need to do type convert and necessary validation as well. For instance, the height is number, so don't forget to call Number.

function numOrStr(s) {
  return isNaN(s) ? s : Number(s)
}
  
function convert(input) {
  try {
    var arr = input[0].split(':')
    var brand = arr[0]
    arr = arr[1].split('/')

    var result = {
        brand: brand,
        number: Number(arr[1])
    }
    
    input.slice(1).forEach(function(item) {
      item = item.substr((input[0] + '/').length)
      var arr = item.split('/')
      if (arr[0] === 'category') {
        result['category'] = arr[1]
        result[arr[2]] = numOrStr(arr[3])
      } else {
        result[arr[0]] = numOrStr(arr[1])
      }
    })
    
    return result
  } catch (ex) {
    console.error({msg: 'invalid input object', data: input})
  }
}

var input = [
"b1:number/1",
"b1:number/1/chest/85",
"b1:number/1/height/175",
"b1:number/1/hip/90",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_2/m",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_1/m",
"b1:number/1/category/bottoms/size_3/s",
]
var output = convert(input)
console.log(output)

It's look like a good job for regex. Converting your array into js object can be done with this:

Find each array element starting with b1:number and ignore others

\"(((?=b1:number).*[:,/](.*)\/(.*))|(?!>b1:number).*)\"

Then use last 2 groups - before and after last slash - for replace

"$3":"$4"

It will produce js object - just still wrapped in array braces and with empty "properties"

[ "":"", "number":"1", "chest":"85", "height":"175", "hip":"90", "size_2":"m", "size_1":"m", "size_3":"s", ]

Then replace array braces with curly:

"[test]".replace("[", "{").replace("]","}").replace(/"":"",/g, "");;

And finaly you need your custom logic to handle proper data types if even needed in js.

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