15

I have a function where the statement foo should be executed under lock_guard but only when a pointer to a mutex object has been provided to the function as a parameter. Otherwise foo does not have to be protected by lock_guard.

I cannot use the lock_guard within an if because the lock will be released immediately when the if block ends.

so, this code is nonsense:

bar( std::mutex * optionalMutex = nullptr )
{
   ...
   if ( nullptr != optionalMutex ) {
      std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lockScope( *optionalMutex );
   }          <- Here the lock ends

   foo...     <- foo is not protected when optionalMutex was provided
}

I tried something like this:

bar( std::mutex * optionalMutex = nullptr )
{
   ...
   nullptr == optionalMutex ? 0 : std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lockScope( *optionalMutex );

   // this scope should be protected by lock_guard when optionalMutex was provided

   foo...
}

More or less, the only one possible solution for me is to repeat foo:

bar( std::mutex * optionalMutex = nullptr )
{
   ...
   if ( nullptr != optionalMutex ) {
      std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lockScope( *optionalMutex );
      foo...
   }  else {
      foo...
   }
}

The compiler gcc 4.9.3 does not compile the 2nd example and complains: error: expected primary-expression before 'lockScope'. Update: Superlokkus explained in his answer why.

But I do want to avoid any code duplicates and therefore also the duplicate foo.

My question:

Is there an elegant way how to implement this problem and not to use duplicate foo. I know, I could use a lambda function to group foo but I am curious if there is an another solution.

  • This looks a bit scary tbh :) – Galik Jul 27 '16 at 11:42
  • Are you trying to use functionality foo with different mutexes or just in a thread safe or a non threadsafe manner ? – Harald Scheirich Jul 27 '16 at 11:52
  • I guess people are concerned that this is a XY Question ( meta.stackexchange.com/a/66378 ): Does bar something where data races can occur? Why is the mutex optional? Because it could already be held? Or do you have reader/writer? – Superlokkus Jul 27 '16 at 12:30
  • @Superlokkus Why is mutex optional: foo() is a) running with a thread member variable [provided as parameter] and b) with a variable which is controlling all other threads and therefore it must be protected by mutex. But how ever, your answer solved it and is already accepted. – Al Bundy Jul 27 '16 at 12:35
11

How about this one?

void bar(std::mutex * optionalMutex = nullptr)
{
        auto lockScope = (optionalMutex == nullptr) ? 
                           std::unique_lock<std::mutex>() 
                         : std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(*optionalMutex);
}

Explanation: Your compiler had trouble with your prior statement because, you can not suddenly change the type of the ternary ? expression; i.e. the literal 0 is not a std::lock_guard and vice versa. So I changed the two branches to the same type, here std::unique_lock<std::mutex> because lock_guard isn't designed be used without a valid mutex. But still prefer std::lock_guard over std::unique_lock in the simpler cases, because it will make your code more readable.

Also your statement wasn't viable for the compiler, i.e. even syntactical correct, because the variable lockScope would only have existed in one branch.

  • Yes, this was what I was looking for! No dummy mutex and very elegant! Accepted and upvoted! – Al Bundy Jul 27 '16 at 12:10
  • To increase the elegance for your code, have a look at boost optional library - this will let you get rid of ugly nullptr checks – Dmitry Jul 28 '16 at 23:30
  • 1
    Of course one could also write !optionalMutex instead of optionalMutex == nullptr, or even better, inverse the whole conditional. – Superlokkus Jul 29 '16 at 8:06
  • Or alternatively if you have more complex conditions that would look bad with ternary ?: std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock; if (optionalMutex) lock = std::unique_lock<std::mutex>{*optionalMutex); – ipapadop Aug 1 '16 at 16:13
  • @ipapadop While I can relate to your intention, ;-) , I have 2 problems with your explicit if approach: A) You have two statements which means A1) It's prone that some college, or even you and me, will eventually displace it in a rush (see Apple goto Bug) or even "optimize" it out A2) You don't have that sweet RAII semantics anymore, i.e. less readable B) You first create a empty unique lock and then, in most cases, you create another one and forget the old one -> Performance, so even more prone to A1) – Superlokkus Aug 2 '16 at 15:30
9

What you really have is two functions, one that locks, and one that doesn't. The first one can call the second:

void bar() {
    // whatever
}

void bar(std::mutex* mtx) {
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lockScope(*mtx);
    bar();
}
  • What's auto going to resolve to? Wouldn't it be an std::mutex (and what you really want is a std::lock_guard)? And shouldn't the second bar really take the std::mutex by reference (stylistic, I suppose, but enforces that you don't get a nullptr passed to you)? If the caller didn't have a mutex handy, it should be calling bar() anyway. – Andre Kostur Jul 27 '16 at 13:57
  • @AndreKostur - yes, of course, auto was silly. Thanks. – Pete Becker Jul 27 '16 at 15:20
  • 1
    @AndreKostur - yes, it probably should take a reference, not a pointer. The point of the example, though, is to show the connection with the original code, not to advise on style. – Pete Becker Jul 27 '16 at 15:21
  • 2
    Unfortunately this is not a solution for me at all. I did not mentioned foo is a function. I wanted to use it as a synonym for code. In this code there are used local variables defined above the mutex lock which cannot be used in your suggestion. Sorry for the misunderstanding! – Al Bundy Jul 31 '16 at 0:22
2

I have only this solution. Using a dummy mutex object:

The code is:

bar( std::mutex * optionalMutex = nullptr )
{
   ...
   std::mutex dummyMutex;
   std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lockScope( optionalMutex ? *optionalMutex, dummyMutex );

   foo...     <- NOW foo is protected when optionalMutex was provided
}
1

It's a minor gripe but you can avoid passing the the raw pointer by letting the caller pass a std::unique_lock instead:

bar( std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lockScope )
{
    if(lockScope.mutex())
    {
        lockScope.lock();
        //do things
    }
}

This seems like a more clear expression of the interface and reduces potential for abuse.

0

The answer from Superlockus is good enough, but I am wondering why you did not simply write it like that:

bar( std::mutex * optionalMutex = nullptr )
{
   if (optionalMutex)
      optionalMutex->lock():

   foo...

   if (optionalMutex)
      optionalMutex->unlock():
}

lock_guard and unique_lock are convenient but not the only way.

  • 9
    Exceptions and several returns, my dear.... – Al Bundy Jul 28 '16 at 21:33
  • 1
    We don't know foo, it might be good enough :-) – Adrien Hamelin Jul 30 '16 at 6:25

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